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Hacker on the wire


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#1 shazam123

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Posted 29 April 2017 - 04:30 AM

Hi, 

 

I have a nasty hacker on my network and he installed a virus on my computer which is able to reinstall after a complete reformat. When I did a reformat the infected files popped up on the scanner. I used maleware byte's rootkit scan. This virus challenges some of my assumptions of how computers work.

 

Is there a way to get an infected computer from just having the file on one of the hard drives in the computer? I always thought that the user must execute the malicious program for it to get into the system.

 

After a reformat, is there a way to remotely install viruses on that computer? 


Edited by hamluis, 29 April 2017 - 08:48 AM.
Moved from W10 Spt to Am I Infected - Hamluis.


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#2 iMacg3

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Posted 29 April 2017 - 09:17 AM

Yes, a virus or malware program can auto-run itself, exploiting a vulnerability in a system.

Please reset your router by pressing the Reset button (usually on the back).

Set your router to use WPA2 security with a different password than you used last time.

Change the SSID (network name) after you've changed the password.

If you have any devices on your network, please scan them now after making sure there is no hacker on your network by using the below steps.

Make sure all your computers are not infected by running Malwarebytes Anti-Malware on all of your computers and posting the logfiles into a post. . Run the rootkit scanner again on your computer and remove ALL threats.


Edited by iMacg3, 29 April 2017 - 09:18 AM.

Regards, iMacg3

"Do, or do not. There is no try." - Yoda

#3 shazam123

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 09:26 AM

My wifi is shared amongst untrusted computers and I cannot assure that they are virus free. I want to isolate all clients on the network to their own lan but I don't have professional equipment. Is there a way to go about this?

 

I was also thinking I could give each user a user account and password to authenticate with the network. Maybe windows domain login. I've seen this setup before where each user has a specific login. What's this tech called and can I implement it using consumer grade networking hardware?



#4 iMacg3

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 10:22 AM

For the malware infected computers, please run the MBAM tool.

When you "want to isolate all clients on the network to their own lan", do you mean something like a VLAN? You can read about a VLAN here.

You'll need to have WPA2-Enterprise and a RADIUS server for the "unique password" setup.

You'll need to also have a dedicated computer on your network and use a program such as FreeRADIUS.


Regards, iMacg3

"Do, or do not. There is no try." - Yoda




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