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will upgrading my graphics card stop i from overheating


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#1 Resilo

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 12:49 PM

Ok so from my own personal experience with the gtx 1060 i own i know that Final fantasy 14 on high graphics overheats GPU's as powerful as mine and less powerful then mine

 

i have a buddys "gaming computer"  is usually running two GTX 770s in SLI . I have also been tested running with only one GTX 770 and it overheats playing final fantasy 14

with graphics at absolute maximum. Yes i know the easy solution is just to turn down the graphics a little.

 

So what im wondering is from your own knowledge/experience if i recommended an upgrade to a more powerful graphics card would it stop the GPU from overheating?


Edited by hamluis, 27 April 2017 - 05:51 PM.
Moved from System Building to Internal Hardware - Hamluis.

A little information for anyone curious

I am a novice computer technician.

my education is a diploma level in Network Systems Administration.


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#2 jonuk76

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 02:06 PM

I don't think you are thinking about this in a logical way. Overheating happens when the cooling system is unable to transfer the heat from the GPU to the outside environment at a high enough rate. This could happen on a low end or high end GPU. This could be down to:

 

Marginal cooling system design - factory cooler is "just enough" and no more, may rely on loud high speed fans during high load situations.

Dust which collects on the air cooling fins, in fans etc will reduce the efficiency of the cooler. Eventually it can completely hamper it so much overheating becomes a constant problem.

Poor air flow through case.  As said above, the goal of a cooling system is to transfer the heat from hot components to the surrounding environment (the room the computer is in basically). If hot air is not able to escape from the case fast enough, temperatures will rise.
Over time thermal compound between the heatsink and chip can degrade. Renewing it can give significant improvements where this has happened.
 
Note these GPU's can run quite hot without damage, e.g. max temp on the GTX 770 is 98 degrees c. Some manufacturers have taken design decisions which cause the cards to run hotter, for example standard fan speed profiles that favour quietness over cooling.

 

Many 3rd party manufacturers offer different versions of the same card. E.g. they might do a basic "GTX 1060" model based on the reference design with a reference box cooler, and an upgraded one with fancy multi fan heatpipe cooler etc.

 

High end GPU's tend to be more complex, larger chips which consume more energy, which equates to more heat to deal with not less.  Obviously there are differences between generations, i.e. recent Nvidia 9 and 10 series chips are far more energy efficient than the older ones.  A standard GTX 770 uses up to 230 watts of energy.  A GTX 1070 brings this down to 150 watts.  Ultimately, this means less heat to deal with.

 

So in short the answer is no, a high end card may improve things, but won't necessarily overheat any less.  If you buy a card, consider models with upgraded coolers (check reviews etc. to see if worth paying the extra cost).  If you have an older system which has started overheating, there may be things you can do to improve it, e.g. thorough cleaning of heatsink, replacing thermal compound, improving air flow through case by tying down wires, making sure intakes clear of dust etc. etc.

 

Hope this helps


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#3 Resilo

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 02:15 PM

It helps a little at least basically what i was wondering is if you have all your bases covered, thermal paste, cleaned out dust GPU is brand name and has great fans, case has great air flow and great fans. Is this an issue that can be resolved by upgrading the video card because of the lower watt rating or putting in place some kind of cooling device. Or is it something to do with the programming of the game or a malfunctioning setting of the game and basically every GPU will over heat?


A little information for anyone curious

I am a novice computer technician.

my education is a diploma level in Network Systems Administration.


#4 jonuk76

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 03:27 PM

If everything else is working perfectly and the card is still overheating (what does it do by the way, throttle? shut the system down? at what temperature?) then it's likely the cooling is insufficient and needs to be upgraded.  Or you can just go and buy a new card with better cooling of course.

 

Something like Furmark http://www.ozone3d.net/benchmarks/fur/ will put more load on the GPU than normal games.  It's purpose designed to load the GPU to the maximum.  I can run it all day and the temperature eventually gets up to about 57 degrees on an R9-270 card with the fan inaudible.  I had to change the cooling on it (the original fans were rattling) so I replaced the cooler with a Arctic Cooling Mono Plus. On the original cooler (which was a Gigabyte "Windforce" cooler, an upgrade over the reference type) it would get to about 70-75 degrees on Furmark, with the fans whirring loudly...  Still fine, but the noise was the main reason for me changing, not overheating.  The only problem with this particular cooler is it's pretty wide (3 slots), which may be an issue with multiple GPU systems.  They also do dual and triple fan versions for higher TDP video cards.

 

I have a pic here showing it installed:

 

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