Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Software question but not a problem


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 JohnWJ

JohnWJ

  • Members
  • 209 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Mexico
  • Local time:04:09 AM

Posted 23 April 2017 - 01:44 PM

OK I was reading that if you are going to reinstall your operating system that you should deactivate you software IE microsoft office and your software. Now how do you do that ??

 

John


John

 

An Australian Living in the USA


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Chris Cosgrove

Chris Cosgrove

  • Moderator
  • 7,112 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:11:09 AM

Posted 23 April 2017 - 05:44 PM

I think you have misunderstood something. If you are planning on re-installing an OS - or installing a different one for that matter - the only thing you have to do is back up all your data before you even think about re-installing the OS. And I mean all your data - browser bookmarks, contact lists, authorisation codes for any downloaded software as well as the obvious work, music, photos and so on.

 

Then all you need to do is run the installer. If you choose the full install option it will format your hard drive and wipe everything off it and then install your new copy of the OS.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 JohnWJ

JohnWJ
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 209 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Mexico
  • Local time:04:09 AM

Posted 23 April 2017 - 06:51 PM

OK thanks


John

 

An Australian Living in the USA


#4 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:06:09 AM

Posted 23 April 2017 - 07:01 PM

I think you have misunderstood something. If you are planning on re-installing an OS - or installing a different one for that matter - the only thing you have to do is back up all your data before you even think about re-installing the OS. And I mean all your data - browser bookmarks, contact lists, authorisation codes for any downloaded software as well as the obvious work, music, photos and so on.
 
Then all you need to do is run the installer. If you choose the full install option it will format your hard drive and wipe everything off it and then install your new copy of the OS.
 
Chris Cosgrove


The original poster might have been talking about license activation and deactivating the license for that computer so that you don't accidentally get it activated more than once. While this should not happen if the software company designed their activation system well (i.e. so that it can tell you are activating the software again on the same computer), I suppose it is possible it could happen in some cases. It is something that DEFINITELY needs to be done with an old computer that is being sold, recycled, or trashed...assuming the old computer still functions.

#5 JohnWJ

JohnWJ
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 209 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Mexico
  • Local time:04:09 AM

Posted 23 April 2017 - 07:47 PM

 

I think you have misunderstood something. If you are planning on re-installing an OS - or installing a different one for that matter - the only thing you have to do is back up all your data before you even think about re-installing the OS. And I mean all your data - browser bookmarks, contact lists, authorisation codes for any downloaded software as well as the obvious work, music, photos and so on.
 
Then all you need to do is run the installer. If you choose the full install option it will format your hard drive and wipe everything off it and then install your new copy of the OS.
 
Chris Cosgrove


The original poster might have been talking about license activation and deactivating the license for that computer so that you don't accidentally get it activated more than once. While this should not happen if the software company designed their activation system well (i.e. so that it can tell you are activating the software again on the same computer), I suppose it is possible it could happen in some cases. It is something that DEFINITELY needs to be done with an old computer that is being sold, recycled, or trashed...assuming the old computer still functions.

 

Yes that is what I mean


John

 

An Australian Living in the USA


#6 techghost

techghost

  • Members
  • 191 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:09 PM

Posted 25 April 2017 - 12:19 PM

Doesn't the key works if you re-install the software?



#7 JohnWJ

JohnWJ
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 209 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Mexico
  • Local time:04:09 AM

Posted 25 April 2017 - 12:27 PM

Doesn't the key works if you re-install the software?

I have no idea that is why I'm asking read about this in an article and wanted to find out


John

 

An Australian Living in the USA


#8 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:06:09 AM

Posted 25 April 2017 - 07:22 PM

Doesn't the key works if you re-install the software?


Yes.

But how it works will depend on the activation system used by the software manufacturer. Most such activation systems would likely recognize that you are installing on the same computer that is already "recognized" by the system and not throw a fit. It is possible, however, that an activation system may not "recognize" the computer as the same computer that has already be authorized once and thus think you are trying to authorize a second computer. Presumably, the authorization system would have a good way to effectively "de-authorize" the "old computer" (which is the same computer) while then allowing you to "authorize" the "new computer", but it is possible it may not.

In the end, you should not have an issue probably 99+% of the time, but if you can de-activate the program before wiping and re-installing, then you are eliminating that maybe less than 1% chance of some issue.

As a case in point, at one time Adobe's activation system was kind of picky from what I recall. I want to say that I remember wiping a computer to re-install Windows and the programs for some reason and when I went to activate Photoshop again, it considered it as the second activation (Adobe Photoshop licenses have typically allow you to install the program on two computers as long as you did not use it simultaneously on both computers...the intent was so that you could have it on your primary desktop computer for use at home/office and then on a laptop for travel or at home if your desktop was an office computer) even though it was the same computer. It was quite a while ago, so I could be remembering incorrectly. And, of course, their system is different now.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users