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New kernel for Ubuntu based distros do I need to upgrade?


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#1 SuperSapien64

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 08:35 PM

I just watched this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lKqZ1sv0DVc&feature=em-uploademail And it got wondering if I should upgrade my kernel on Linux Mint KDE 17.2?

I'm currently running LTS kernel 3.13.0-107 and I know there where some kernel exploits recently. So does my LTS kernel have me covered?



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#2 Al1000

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 12:41 PM

Hi, yes your LTS will receive security updates for the kernel.

I am also running kernel 3.13 on Kubuntu 14.04 on my main pc, and have no plans to change.

#3 The-Toolman

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 03:03 PM

Unless I'm having problems I'm staying with a working kernel or at least wait until the newer kernel is proven to be a successful upgrade.

 

Kernel upgrades can sometimes create problems if the new kernel no longer supports hardware that a previous kernel supported.


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#4 SuperSapien64

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 08:06 PM

Thanks Al1000 and The-Toolman.



#5 cat1092

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 04:28 AM

Unless I'm having problems I'm staying with a working kernel or at least wait until the newer kernel is proven to be a successful upgrade.

 

Kernel upgrades can sometimes create problems if the new kernel no longer supports hardware that a previous kernel supported.

 

+1! :thumbup2:

 

So can newer distros, which has newer kernels by default. This is why many are sticking with distros based on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, such as Linux Mint 17.3. When trying to apply a newer kernel, I broke the OS on the notebook my wife uses, so installed 18.1 & all is fine. This goes to show that not only the hardware may be broken by adding a newer kernel, the OS can be as well.  

 

Actually, it turned out for the best, as by default & w/out having to add a PPA, the discrete NVIDIA GPU drivers were there, when checking for Hardware Updates, as well as the Intel microcode one. So I performed half the work in installing Mint 18 versus 17. Of course, on an older computer, this may had been the reverse, although Linux Mint is one of the few distros that supports dated hardware out of the box, going back to the Pentium M days. :)

 

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#6 DeimosChaos

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 10:20 AM

As everyone else has already said, unless a new kernel has some new hardware type integration features you need (which a while back was required for when there was no integration with the intel/Nvidia graphics switching), there is no need to update. Just let your distro push out the required security updates or full kernel updates as it normally does. No need to speed up the process.


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#7 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 03:02 PM

'Cat:-

 

I know this is wayyyy off-topic here (and it's only an aside, anyway), but; does installing the occasional CPU microcode update really make a measurable, detectable real-world difference?

 

I've heard so much 'waffle' surrounding this subject in recent years.....

 

 

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#8 dna9

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Posted 27 April 2017 - 11:58 AM

yep.  always upgrade your kernel.



#9 cat1092

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Posted 28 April 2017 - 03:14 AM

'Cat:-

 

I know this is wayyyy off-topic here (and it's only an aside, anyway), but; does installing the occasional CPU microcode update really make a measurable, detectable real-world difference?

 

I've heard so much 'waffle' surrounding this subject in recent years.....

 

 

Mike.  :wink:

 

Mike, to be honest, I don't know the answer to that, only that Windows pushes a similar KB update to address the microcode patch. However, note that it mess up (permanently) the ability to overclock a certain unlocked Pentium 4th gen CPU, may have been their Anniversary Edition of the CPU. 

 

Although it certainly didn't mess up either of my Devil's Canyon CPU's, on either Linux or Windows. Will have to further research what the microcode update is supposed to accomplish, and from me, a huge Thanks for bringing this to my attention. :)

 

The last thing that I want to do is ruin expensive CPU's, although it's Intel whom releases this firmware, and ships to the OS's for distribution. May have to ask on the Intel site what's the deal here. 

 

For a different reason, I don't install the Intel ME (a wide open backdoor) software, and uninstall on any PC I work on for others, as well as disable Secure Boot, there's no security there, other than OEM's (on behalf of Microsoft) telling it's paying customers what we can & can't do with our paid for hardware. Sometimes a newly released piece of hardware (example, a GPU), may require an unsigned (usually Beta) driver to install the component. Plus it doesn't need to be enabled anyway, as it provides no active protection & if I install a SSD, Fast Boot also is a goner, a known battery killer, and being half powered on 24/7, cannot be good for the computer as a whole. :(

 

Will check out the Microcode updates for AMD & Intel, as these are released for both brands. :)

 

EDIT: Mike, here's an article, not from Microsoft, nor AMD/Intel, rather from Debian, a sweet, understandably written find. :)

 

https://wiki.debian.org/Microcode

 

I'm now convinced that am doing the right thing in applying these firmware updates, just as we would for new kernels, only when a new one is offered. :) 

 

 

 

Or you could experience one of those unexplainable and infrequent software issues (such as kernel oops, application segfaults) or hardware issues (including sudden reboots and hangs).

 

That's exactly what was going on with my XPS 8700 when running Windows 7, 8.1 & 10, although didn't with Linux Mint 17 (including point releases), am about to unpack & redeploy the PC, will be my main Linux one once complete, with a powerful i7-4770 CPU & 32GB of DDR3-1600 RAM. :guitar:

 

Note that the kernels for Ubuntu 16.04 likely won't apply to 14.04, as well as other distros based from it. Newer kernels for these older OS's are released as needed, applying one designed for a newer OS may break the install, nor is optimized for the older release. As posted above, I learned this lesson just a few days back, however when I clean installed 18.1, the new kernel was there for install & the computer runs as good as ever, if not better. :)

 

Plus the GPU drivers were shown w/out adding a PPA, as well as the microcode update. Please read the posted article above (which includes the quote) as to why these should be installed. :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 28 April 2017 - 04:04 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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