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Image Backup for Windows XP SP3


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#1 chembel

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 12:26 PM

I have a workstation that is operating an inspection camera on a manufacturing floor. The HD is a Seagate ST380011A. There have been a few occasions of this machine doing a BSOD.

 

The supervisor would like me to make a back up image of this machine. My concern is that Acronis 2017 does not include Windows XP SP3 in their system requirements list. The list only goes back as far as Windows 7. I did call Acronis Support and they "said" it would work. Just don't know if I believe it.

 

I know that Seagate offers a limited edition of Acronis to generate an image, but it is my understanding that it will only restore the information to the exact same computer. My concern is that what the supervisor is thinking is that they will be able to restore this image to a new computer if the old one dies.

 

Can anyone tell me if I will be able to move the image if I use the Seagate software or if Acronis 2017 will actually work with Windows XP SP3?


Edited by hamluis, 21 April 2017 - 06:46 PM.
Moved from XP to Backup/Imaging - Hamluis.


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#2 RolandJS

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 01:24 PM

I don't know about Acronis restoring to another company, however, I do know Macrium Reflect can restore to another company. I think a little jumping through the menu hoops will allow you to restore to another partition or another hard-drive on the same or different computer.   I think Windows A can only be used in one computer at a time. (I'm a classroom showing movies, such can be a little distracting, watching the students.)


Edited by RolandJS, 21 April 2017 - 01:25 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#3 smax013

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 02:39 PM

I have a workstation that is operating an inspection camera on a manufacturing floor. The HD is a Seagate ST380011A. There have been a few occasions of this machine doing a BSOD.
 
The supervisor would like me to make a back up image of this machine. My concern is that Acronis 2017 does not include Windows XP SP3 in their system requirements list. The list only goes back as far as Windows 7. I did call Acronis Support and they "said" it would work. Just don't know if I believe it.
 
I know that Seagate offers a limited edition of Acronis to generate an image, but it is my understanding that it will only restore the information to the exact same computer. My concern is that what the supervisor is thinking is that they will be able to restore this image to a new computer if the old one dies.
 
Can anyone tell me if I will be able to move the image if I use the Seagate software or if Acronis 2017 will actually work with Windows XP SP3?


If you use the bootable media (either created if you bought True Image online or the optical disc it came on if you bought a physical copy), boot into Acronis True Image 2017, and then either image or clone the drive that way it should not matter what the OS on the drive is. This is the way I always tend to use True Image.

#4 RolandJS

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 09:14 PM

4/23 addendum:

"...I don't know about Acronis restoring to another company,

however, I do know Macrium Reflect can restore to another company...."

 

I just now noticed my error in my earlier post, #2!  It should read:

"...I don't know about Acronis restoring to another company's computer,

however, I do know Macrium Reflect can restore to another company's computer...."


Edited by RolandJS, 23 April 2017 - 07:14 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#5 smax013

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 05:28 PM

"...however, I do know Macrium Reflect can restore to another company...."
I just now noticed my error in my earlier post, #2!  It should read:
however, I do know Macrium Reflect can restore to another computer


Just be careful about restoring an image that includes the OS (as well as installed applications) to another computer...no matter what backup/imaging program you use. When "moving" an OS to a new computer, there will always be two potentially hurdles/problems: 1) drivers from the old computer that do not match/work with the new computer; and 2) Windows activation issues due the license type of Windows.

For #1, best case scenario is that the drivers are just deactivated during the Windows boot up. Worst case, and more typical scenario I believe, is that Windows will crash/blue screen due to the wrong drivers.

For #2, if the Windows OS came with a "manufactured" computer, then it will likely not work at all as those type of OEM licenses are generally "tied" to the hardware. So, in this scenario, you likely will not even get to an activation screen. If you have a "builder's" (aka "individual" OEM) license, then that license is tied to the hardware for activation. While you will get to the activation screen, in theory you should not be able to activate it as the hardware has changed and even if you could trick Microsoft into activating by lying to them, you would be in violation of the license agreement. Technically, you can only move a "retail" license (which is the most expensive) from one computer to another (the other exception is if you have something like an enterprise site license).

In addition to moving the OS, there is the issue of moving applications. Generally, to my knowledge, restoring installed applications only works if you are also restoring the OS. There are some applications that this will not apply to, but many Window applications spew all kind of things into the Registry, which would be missing if you restore the application from the backup/image without also restoring the Registry somehow. As a result, if you are not also moving the OS, you would need to reinstall the applications rather than restore them from the image/backup.

#6 DragonHere

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 10:20 PM

You can restore the image to some virtual machine program ( e.g. Oracle VirtualBox ) to see if the image works. If Acronis TrueImage does not work, you can try Clonezilla ( it is free of charge ) and it should supports XP SP3. Though the driver compatibility problem after the image restore is always a headache.



#7 chembel

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Posted 27 April 2017 - 10:46 AM

Well, I just got back to this workstation and I now realize that this workstation is not up to SP3 it is at SP2. Any ideas about some software that would work with Windows XP SP2?



#8 smax013

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Posted 27 April 2017 - 11:01 AM

Again, if you use the bootable media to boot into Acronis True Image directly and NOT into Windows...and then clone or image the boot drive, it should not matter at all what version of the Windows OS is installed on the boot drive. It is all being done completely independent of Windows. This would also be true of restoring that backup image to the same computer if you do it from the bootable media.

The only way the Windows OS would become an issue if you use the bootable media (rather than booting into Windows and then backing up using True Image from within Windows) is if you then try to restore that image (or clone) to another computer. And then the issue(s) would be related to Windows issues, NOT True Image issues.

About the only thing that Windows XP SP2 might impact related to True Image is whether or not the computer can boot from a USB drive. And that is only related to Windows XP SP2 in the sense that a computer running that old of an OS does not likely support booting from a USB drive (i.e. it has nothing to do with Windows XP SP2 itself, but rather what Windows XP SP2 "says" about the age of the computer). If this is the case, then you just use a True Image bootable optical disc as even really old Windows computers can boot from optical discs.

#9 chembel

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Posted 27 April 2017 - 11:20 AM

Okay, now I am going to ask a really stupid question. If I use the bootable media of Acronis boot into Acronis, how do I create the image. Does Acronis use the same type of tools with the bootable media that are used on the desktop version that I use on my current computer? Can I put the image on a USB drive and still recover it from the USB drive if when I am restoring the image, I boot into the CD media? Or do I have to generate CDs to install with the Acronis bootable media?



#10 smax013

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Posted 27 April 2017 - 11:40 AM

Okay, now I am going to ask a really stupid question. If I use the bootable media of Acronis boot into Acronis, how do I create the image. Does Acronis use the same type of tools with the bootable media that are used on the desktop version that I use on my current computer? Can I put the image on a USB drive and still recover it from the USB drive if when I am restoring the image, I boot into the CD media? Or do I have to generate CDs to install with the Acronis bootable media?


It will effectively work the same way whether you are using the bootable media or the version installed in Windows. It is still the same underlying program being used. It will detect an attached USB drive fine, thus allowing you to either create a backup image file on the external USB drive or restore from a backup image file that is on the external USB drive. I just used this method (albeit with True Image 2016, not True Image 2017...but they will work the same way) to make backup image files of a couple internal drives on a friend's computer and the image files were saved to an external USB drive. This is the way I tend to use True Image all the time...I do not actually install it in Windows.

The only effective difference is that the interface will be a little different. At a minimum, the bootable media interface will be lower resolution. I honestly don't know if the actual program interface will be the same or not. As I mentioned above, I don't actually install True Image in Windows...just use the bootable media.




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