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Clone Disk that contains Users data, but not the OS


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#1 Other Foot

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Posted 15 April 2017 - 08:54 PM

I have a Windows 10 Pro system with 3 SSDs. The C: drive has the OS, but the Users portion of that OS has been moved to the E: drive and has worked quite well for 2+ years. However, the 500 GB E: drive is getting full fast, so I purchased a 5 TB HDD to take its place. (In case you are wondering about the D: SSD - I use that for the scratch disk/virtual memory/etc.)

 

I purchased Acronis True Image 2017 to help me clone the old drive and recreate it to the new HDD. There doesn't seem to be any instructions that I could find that addresses this situation. I thought I did the job right and the computer restarted after the cloning process and both drives, the existing and the new, had the identical files and folders.

 

When I shut the computer down and removed the old E: and connected the new HDD in its place (using the same SATA cable that the old drive used), the computer would not finish booting, giving this error:

 

The ProfSvc service failed the sign-in.
User profile cannot be loaded.

 

I shut down again and reconnected the old E: drive and I was back to normal (I had to log out, then back in again, but otherwise no prob).

 

Now I'm back to where I started. I s'pose I will have to reformat the new drive and clone it again, but there's a step or more that I ain't getting right. I need your help, please. It may just be the option presented to make the drive bootable or not. I chose not because it's not the OS drive I'm cloning. But that was prob'ly the wrong choice because the Users profile has to boot up with the OS drive.

 

Your guidance will be appreciated.

 



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#2 RolandJS

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 05:16 AM

In reReading your opening, I am not sure the following applies to you; please use disk manager to check...

 

I'm familiar with Acronis True Image.  A problem I have ran across, from time to time, not always, is the cloned target HD is not automatically flagged Primary, Active by the cloning operations nor by Windows.  Sometimes, I had to use Acronis Disk Director, you can use anything similar whether free or pay-for, to manually mark my OS-containing HD's boot-partition as Active.  My particular Windows has a System Reserved partition that must be marked Active.  My partition containing Windows and 3rd party programs should be marked Primary.  Once the proper Active and Primary markings are made, a couple of reColdBoots later, Windows usually finishes and fine-tunes the remainder markings.  If you want to see what they all are:  after you get this HD working, use Windows disk manager, full-screen its display, expand the fields, and see the normal markings and settings for all your HDs and partitions therein.


Edited by RolandJS, 17 April 2017 - 05:19 AM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#3 Scoop8

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 08:38 AM

"Diskpart" (included in Windows) can be used to mark a partition as Active (or Inactive).

 

Launch a CMD window. At the CMD prompt, type diskpart .

 

Here's a copy of my Diskpart commands where I marked one of my Flash Drive partitions as Active as an example.

 

The Diskpart system text is in green.  My entries are in blue.  The Flash Drive is Disk 3 .

 

Microsoft DiskPart version 6.1.7601
Copyright © 1999-2008 Microsoft Corporation.
On computer: JEFF-PC

DISKPART> list disk

  Disk ###  Status         Size     Free     Dyn  Gpt
  --------  -------------  -------  -------  ---  ---
  Disk 0    Online          465 GB      0 B
  Disk 1    Online          931 GB      0 B
  Disk 2    Online          465 GB   100 MB
  Disk 3    Online           15 GB      0 B

DISKPART> select disk 3

Disk 3 is now the selected disk.

DISKPART> list partition

  Partition ###  Type              Size     Offset
  -------------  ----------------  -------  -------
  Partition 1    Primary             15 GB  1024 KB

DISKPART> select partition 1

Partition 1 is now the selected partition.

DISKPART> active

DiskPart marked the current partition as active.

DISKPART>

 

When you're done, exit Diskpart.

 

You can verify by using the Disk Management console by using the Control Panel menu paths or directly via the Run dialog:

 

<win>r  (hold down the Win key while pressing the r key

 

In the Run dialog window, enter

 

diskmgmt.msc

 

Sometimes, the Disk Mgmt screen won't indicate the current change in status when a partition is marked Active (or Inactive) even after a Refresh or a Rescan of Disk Management.  If you exit Disk Management & re-enter it, the current partition status should be displayed correctly.



#4 Other Foot

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 09:15 PM

Thank you Roland and Scoop for your replies. I'm sorry I left you hangin'. My original problem was that I moved not just the user data files (Documents, Pictures, etc.), but the folders and files of C:\Users was redirected/moved to E:\Users et al. The only user left on C: was C:\Users\Administrator - I wasn't able to move that folder. That was all done several years ago on the Windows 8.1 system. When Windows 10 installed, it didn't complain. It prob'ly should have.

 

I've since learned that moving data folders is fine, but one should not move the Users profile folders. It's actually very easy to create a new folder/file system on a separate drive and just point each of the C:\Users\[username]\ data folders to its counterpart on the other drive. However, if you did what I did a long time ago, it becomes quite a chore to move those user profile folders back to C:.

 

Searching the Internet, I discovered I'm not the only foolish guy behind a keyboard. I found instructions to get the profile folders moved back and doing it with empty data folders (after all, there wasn't enough room on the C: drive either). Once I finally did that, and also fixed the problem with my Outlook 2016 PST files, I have my system running pretty smooth. Of course, this resulted in an already too small C: drive to get perilously close to being full, so I used the now unused 512 GB SSD, formerly known as E:, to do a clone of C: and use it to replace my 128 GB SSD, C:.

 

Sorry, I don't do well with making long stories short. ;) Thanks for your willingness to help me out. I'm happy to be back to normal now.



#5 Scoop8

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 07:08 AM

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