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Can't find VeraCrypt public key file


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#1 Achaemenid

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Posted 15 April 2017 - 04:35 PM

This file should be called Veracrypt_PGP_PUBLIC_KEY.asc

 

In the Instructions I have read these are the steps:

1. download veracrypt=1.19-setup.tar.bz2   ------ DONE

2, validate signature on the file using PGP. ----- DONE

3. Use NEMO file manager to go to /home/Downloads

4. Right-click VeraCrypt_PGP_public_key.asc and select "Open with import key"

 

source: https://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?t=231976

 

My problem may be twofold. I put my veracrypt files in another file on my desktop, the same directory where I keep my personal pgp files.

But I do not find any file anywere named

Veracrypt_PGP_PUBLIC_KEY.asc

 

But I do not see how you can get a file named that.

When you download the Veracrypt public key you are just copying the public key then pasting it into a text file.  You can name it anything you want.

 

Since I have completed some of the process, should I go back and re-do everything?

Will pgp allow me to very and import the same keys again?

Is the mistake here not downloading everything into Downloads? 

 

 

I just found a file on the veracrypt downloads site called:

 PGP Signature for VeraCrypt 1.19 user Guide

 

When I downloaded and tried to open it, Linux said I could not open it in the red banner at the top of the screen. But when I clicked "cancel" to get rid of it, the Veracrypt public key appeared.  

I then renamed this Veracrypt_PGP_PUBLIC_KEY.asc

 

Then according to instructions I right clicked this file, but there should have been a choice to "Open with Import Key"  But there was not.

https://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?t=23197

 

Any assistance in unraveling this would be appreciated so I can install Veracrypt.


Edited by Achaemenid, 15 April 2017 - 04:53 PM.


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#2 cat1092

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 03:31 AM

Achaemenid, here's a page from the link you provided with detailed instructions on how to generate PGP keys on Linux, to include use for any application that calls for one. :)

 

https://www.deepdotweb.com/2015/02/17/basic-guide-pgp-linux/

 

If you've already read this article, please take the time to review, as anyone of us can easily miss a step in the process. 

 

It's my hope that this is helpful, if not, please feel free to post any concerns. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#3 Achaemenid

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 01:11 PM

Achaemenid, here's a page from the link you provided with detailed instructions on how to generate PGP keys on Linux, to include use for any application that calls for one. :)

 

https://www.deepdotweb.com/2015/02/17/basic-guide-pgp-linux/

 

If you've already read this article, please take the time to review, as anyone of us can easily miss a step in the process. 

 

It's my hope that this is helpful, if not, please feel free to post any concerns. :)

 

Cat

Thanks for responding.

DeepDotWeeb was my guide for installing pgp. I followed it carefully or so I thought

My purpose was to verify my copy of Veracrypt, which I did,

But I must have become confused and retraced my steps.

In any case since I knew I had a good copy of VC I went ahead and installed.



#4 cat1092

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 02:04 AM

Good to hear! :thumbup2:

 

The devs simply of VeraCrypt simply took over the abandoned TrueCrypt project, kind of strange that those devs abandoned their project, had just been audited & all looked OK. While it's up for grabs as to 'why' they left, many feels the US government were knocking on their doors hard looking for possible leads to backdoors (forced out of business) or they simply after 10 years felt that it was time to move on. Which could also have to do with the first, becoming tired of the post-9/11 harassment over locked Flash drives that secret couriers were caught with & the passwords were uncrackable. It was not the TrueCrypt devs fault that these were used for secret missions, in that case, why didn't they go after the big OEM's? it was their mass-produced computers that made this possible.

 

Plus there was no real way to know if their venture was profitable, while many used TrueCrypt freely, one can guess that only a small percentage actually paid the first red cent for their services. :(

 

Hopefully VeraCrypt will be more profitable, as folks who are using it knows how lucky they are to have an alternative. While I've not used the software, if I were to, would at least have the courtesy to make a donation, as I have for several projects over the course of years. 

 

Good Luck with VeraCrypt! Any further questions, please feel free to ask. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 Achaemenid

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 01:14 PM

Good to hear! :thumbup2:

 

The devs simply of VeraCrypt simply took over the abandoned TrueCrypt project, kind of strange that those devs abandoned their project, had just been audited & all looked OK. While it's up for grabs as to 'why' they left, many feels the US government were knocking on their doors hard looking for possible leads to backdoors (forced out of business) or they simply after 10 years felt that it was time to move on. Which could also have to do with the first, becoming tired of the post-9/11 harassment over locked Flash drives that secret couriers were caught with & the passwords were uncrackable. It was not the TrueCrypt devs fault that these were used for secret missions, in that case, why didn't they go after the big OEM's? it was their mass-produced computers that made this possible.

 

Plus there was no real way to know if their venture was profitable, while many used TrueCrypt freely, one can guess that only a small percentage actually paid the first red cent for their services. :(

 

Hopefully VeraCrypt will be more profitable, as folks who are using it knows how lucky they are to have an alternative. While I've not used the software, if I were to, would at least have the courtesy to make a donation, as I have for several projects over the course of years. 

 

Good Luck with VeraCrypt! Any further questions, please feel free to ask. :)

 

Cat

Thanks for responding.

 

There are a lot of alternative encryption programs available.

Some private companies have their own programs.

 

Linux has LUKS. I tried encrypting my entire HDD with it, but there were so many problems I did a clean install with no encryption. I will try just encrypting a volume.



#6 cat1092

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 01:55 PM

Thanks for responding.

 

 

 

There are a lot of alternative encryption programs available.

Some private companies have their own programs.

 

Linux has LUKS. I tried encrypting my entire HDD with it, but there were so many problems I did a clean install with no encryption. I will try just encrypting a volume.

 

 

Yes it's best to try a volume first, maybe run a few tests with random data until you get the hang of VeraCrypt, and afterwards, encrypt only what you want to remain private. :)

 

I once tried the native encryption of the /home partition of Linux Mint, and there was a noticeable performance hit with going for it all. My /home is on HDD & root on SSD, so the encryption exposed the slowness between the two, don't know if things would had been different had /home been on SSD. 

 

Going back to the above post, I now recall trying TrueCrypt on a 4GiB USB stick, although found it to be tricky to work, so use USB sticks that requires a key to be entered for safe storage. While it may not be as secure as VeraCrypt, or the former TrueCrypt, there was something about swirling the mouse cursor in the container setup around in a certain area for a few minutes to make the encryption stronger, I believe a 2048 bit encryption. It's been many years back since I performed this one time, then got rid of it, so forget the exact details. :)

 

What I could never understand was, I generated random key, what was the swirling supposed to accomplish? Is VeraCrypt that way today? Just wondering, since they picked up the TrueCrypt project over. I may be interested in giving VeraCrypt a shot myself, as I know that my passphrase protected USB sticks aren't as secure as true encryption, it's just a padlock. If found by a determined thief, can be inserted in a mid-powered PC with the right software & left to run until the needed 'handshake' is found. May take a few hours to a few days, these are only as secure as the passphrase, which is far from the protection that VeraCrypt provides.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 Achaemenid

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 03:27 PM

Yes it's best to try a volume first, maybe run a few tests with random data until you get the hang of VeraCrypt, and afterwards, encrypt only what you want to remain private. :)
 
I once tried the native encryption of the /home partition of Linux Mint, and there was a noticeable performance hit with going for it all. My /home is on HDD & root on SSD, so the encryption exposed the slowness between the two, don't know if things would had been different had /home been on SSD. 
 
Going back to the above post, I now recall trying TrueCrypt on a 4GiB USB stick, although found it to be tricky to work, so use USB sticks that requires a key to be entered for safe storage. While it may not be as secure as VeraCrypt, or the former TrueCrypt, there was something about swirling the mouse cursor in the container setup around in a certain area for a few minutes to make the encryption stronger, I believe a 2048 bit encryption. It's been many years back since I performed this one time, then got rid of it, so forget the exact details. :)
 
What I could never understand was, I generated random key, what was the swirling supposed to accomplish? Is VeraCrypt that way today? Just wondering, since they picked up the TrueCrypt project over. I may be interested in giving VeraCrypt a shot myself, as I know that my passphrase protected USB sticks aren't as secure as true encryption, it's just a padlock. If found by a determined thief, can be inserted in a mid-powered PC with the right software & left to run until the needed 'handshake' is found. May take a few hours to a few days, these are only as secure as the passphrase, which is far from the protection that VeraCrypt provides.
 
Cat


I tried doing a small VC test volume on Windows and there were no problems.

Regarding the swirling, I think pgp also wants you do do something like that, generating random energy to create the key. 4096 is the strongest.

I used emtec (french company) password protected usb stick for a while. Sandisk had a protected usb stick that create a vault in your computer. Didn't work, and Sandisk has a bad reputation for that.

You can probably use any device for encryption, but Veracrypt gives several warnings, including not using wear-leveling devices.

#8 cat1092

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 02:06 AM

 

 

Sandisk had a protected usb stick that create a vault in your computer. Didn't work, and Sandisk has a bad reputation for that.

 

While I have two of their former 'U3' 4GiB USB sticks, don't recall anything being placed on my computer, although when I inserted the sticks (worked only on Windows 2000 through Vista when I purchased), don't recall anything going on my computer, just the U3 popup upon insertion of the USB stick. You've likely seen these also, if that password is forgotten, am out of luck. However, in the event it does need to be erased with the HP Format Tool, what I normally use for USB sticks, the U3 app can be reinstalled, if desired. One of mine was my Portable Apps drive. :)

 

Now I can't get either to popup on W10, or 8.1, haven't tried on Linux Mint. Maybe it'll work on W7, has been some time since last used either. If needed, have two XP installs left to open with, I don't want to lose anything important on the one, although the other with Portable Apps has to be old as far as the software goes, unless there's a special tool that's valuable & no replacement for. Really need to create a modern one, although on a much larger USB stick (at least 16 GiB). 

 

Due to their small size, today these would make perfect VeraCrypt drives. I could transfer all of the data on the one to other sticks, zap both with the HP Format Tool, and would be VeraCrypt ready. :thumbsup:

 

The cool thing about VeraCrypt (unlike U3), it's multi platform, so wouldn't matter which OS I'm on to open these. Am not sure if 4096 bit encryption was available when I tried TrueCrypt, that would be 2x harder to open than 2048 bit, yet still, the latter is considered enough protection for most, would have to be plugged into a powerful PC (with an 8 core CPU) & ran non-stop for many years to get the random generated key, if possible within our lifetime. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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