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New system with Windows 10 - how to set it up?


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#1 giantatx

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 09:55 AM

Hi, I've just received my new system with Windows 10

 

Processor: AMD Ryzen 7 1700X CPU, 8 Cores, 3.4 - 3.8GHz
Graphics Card: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 6GB Graphics Card
Motherboard: Asus PRIME B350M-A Motherboard
 
Can anyone recommend any procedures for a new system so as to try and ensure stable future use?  I've heard Windows 10 has plenty of backdoors.  Is there any way to work around these backdoors?
 
In the past I'd always install AVG anti-virus but it has a habit of installing annoying software when it does an update which I then have to subsequently remove.


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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 10:17 AM

Windows 10 does not have any backdoors but it does have plenty of telemetry which you can adjust. 

 

You can alter your privacy settings all in one window in the Creators update. This update is currently being pushed out.

 

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/04/11/windows_10_creators_update_general_rollout_begins_complete_with_privacy_dialog/

 

These Privacy settings may have changed for your build.

 

Windows will automatically download your security updates on Windows 10. Other than that there is not much to can do other than disable automatic driver updates and also disable Fast Startup. As far as an AV it has been said that Windows Defender provides adequate protection in Windows 10. 

 

The most important thing you can do is create a complete disk image and regular intervals to an external USB drive using backup software such as Macrium Free or Aomei Backupper. I prefer 3rd party backup solutions to Windows native backup because images can easily be mounted to a virtual drive. Incremental, differential images can be created from the base image.

 

BC member britechguy may see this thread and add his thoughts. 



#3 giantatx

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 10:40 AM

Thanks, will look into your suggestions.   :cool:



#4 britechguy

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 11:12 AM

Windows 10 does not have any backdoors but it does have plenty of telemetry which you can adjust. 

 

You can alter your privacy settings all in one window in the Creators update. This update is currently being pushed out.

 

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/04/11/windows_10_creators_update_general_rollout_begins_complete_with_privacy_dialog/

 

         The statement "all in one window" is not accurate.  The only thing that shows up in that Window are privacy settings that might be/have been affected by the Creators Update.   One should definitely "cruise through" the Privacy Settings, all panes, after the update completes.  This is all the more true if you've not bothered to do so before Creators Update.

 

These Privacy settings may have changed for your build.

 

Windows will automatically download your security updates on Windows 10. Other than that there is not much to can do other than disable automatic driver updates and also disable Fast Startup. As far as an AV it has been said that Windows Defender provides adequate protection in Windows 10. 

 

        The article on automatic driver updates is grossly out of date.  I believe that dialog changed way back at Version 1511, but if it wasn't then it was at Version 1607 (the Anniversary update).  I have put together a set of instructions for my visually impaired clients about how they can at least attempt to disable automatic driver updates that makes note of the change, including in the verbiage of the dialog itself, which has become far more cryptic.  See:  

I personally despise Fast Startup and always disable it.  It is a partial hibernation when it's on where the system state, but not the user state (which is included in full hibernation), is written out to a hiberfile.  The problem being that over time the hiberfile can, and in my experience I would say does, become corrupted.  You can get some really, really inexplicable behaviors (like the keyboard no longer working) due to a corrupt hiberfile and since that is reloaded "without question" because it's presumed to be good the only way around it is a Restart.   Now, most sane people would presume that a Shut Down would power down the machine and reboot the OS entirely from scratch, but that's not what it does if Fast Startup is enabled, and that Restart would be "quick and dirty" but it's not - it forces a from scratch reload of the Windows 10 OS from disc.  Entirely backward in the default configuration in my opinion.  When I shut down I expect that I am shut down, completely, and will be restarting the OS anew when I power up again.   As long as you know you can get a fresh load of the OS from disc by using Restart you can work around Fast Startup issues when they occur, but I don't want to do that and I don't find my startup times are improved all that much using Fast Startup.

 

The most important thing you can do is create a complete disk image and regular intervals to an external USB drive using backup software such as Macrium Free or Aomei Backupper. I prefer 3rd party backup solutions to Windows native backup because images can easily be mounted to a virtual drive. Incremental, differential images can be created from the base image.

 

I'm using Macrium Reflect Free and it's either incremental or differential images (I can never keep straight which) that the free version doesn't do.  I believe it's differential.  One of the things I like about Macrium is that you can choose (and it is a choice) to have it installed in such a way that when the system is booted up it's recovery console will show up as one of the boot options along with Windows 10.  Were you to have need to restore from an image that makes things so much easier than having to dig out the bootable media for Macrium that is needed to do recovery.  I just always hit Enter when that screen comes up as Windows 10 is the default OS choice, not Macrium recovery.

 

BC member britechguy may see this thread and add his thoughts. 

 

Yup.  And there they are.

 

There are also some interesting changes to the Settings where Apps is now broken out into its own separate dialog (no longer under System) and a new one for Gaming is included as well.  The Apps settings, Apps & Features Pane, has a new item as the first one "Installing Apps" that will default to "Allow Apps from the Store Only" if your system settings (and it seems dependent on UAC settings from what I've been able to determine - if you have the default level [2] or the stricter yet level [3] you get "store only" while if you use levels 1 or 0 [off] you get "from anywhere") are at the default.  I don't use Apps (downloaded, that is) proper but I have lots of desktop apps (formerly known as installed programs) and I suspect that you will have trouble installing those if the "store only" setting is allowed to stand, but I have not yet tried to verify that.  I just put it back to "from anywhere."


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1703, Build 15063

       

    A man's worst difficulties begin when he is able to do as he likes.
              ~ Thomas H. Huxley (1876)

 


#5 giantatx

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 07:12 AM

Reading through these posts and links has convinced me I need to move away from Windows to Linux.  That Telemetry (euphemism for backdoors) is a joke.  I thought we had laws which forbid invasion of privacy - aren't I naive!

 

When I move to Linux, my only problem would be that I like to game occasionally for which I'd need a Windows OS.



#6 britechguy

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 09:42 AM

That Telemetry (euphemism for backdoors) is a joke.  I thought we had laws which forbid invasion of privacy - aren't I naive!

 

 

System health telemetry has been used by every contemporary operating system, including many distros of Linux, for quite some time now.  It's not a euphemism for anything but describes what the purpose of said telemetry is.

 

You can get some pretty fine grained control over what is reported back to Microsoft that is not system health telemetry and I've got pretty much anything that isn't in that category turned off.

 

The controls are there and easy to use.  It's no shock that Microsoft, or any other company these days, will try to collect as much information as they can in order to derive financial benefit from it.  At least with Windows 10 you have an awful lot of choice as to what you allow or disallow.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1703, Build 15063

       

    A man's worst difficulties begin when he is able to do as he likes.
              ~ Thomas H. Huxley (1876)

 


#7 JohnC_21

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 09:50 AM

As far as I know the only System Health telemetry that linux uses is throught Apport and that is disabled by default. This is for Ubuntu. I am not sure of other distros.

 

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Apport

 

Edit: I will have to revise my statement in that Ubuntu does send diagnostic info occasionally outside of Apport but it is optional.

Attached Files


Edited by JohnC_21, 20 April 2017 - 10:26 AM.


#8 giantatx

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 10:15 AM

I tried to disable the fast start up but of course many of the options in the guide aren't available on my system and so I'm unable to change it as it is.

 

I'm trying to add the sleep/hibernate mode to my system but of course many of the options in the guide aren't available on my system and so I'm unable to change it.

 

£1500 on a new computer and half a day of messing around with settings and nothing!  Well at least I get to see the youtube ads and other bloatware more quickly than on the old system.  2017 Tech, don't ya just love it!  The future is in safe hands.

 

Oh yea, do I get to buy an antivirus program which can catch the viruses created by the same antivirus company?  Money and time well spent, eh?



#9 medab1

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 10:39 AM

Fast startup should be easy to disable in BIOS.

 

or via this---

 

https://www.howtogeek.com/243901/the-pros-and-cons-of-windows-10s-fast-startup-mode/

 

Use Google.



#10 JohnC_21

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 10:47 AM

You can install the following addons to firefox to eliminate any youtube ads.

 

Adblock Plus

Ghostery

NoScript

 

For Chrome

 

Adguard

Ghostery

 

To turn off Fast Startup press the Windows key + X cmd > as admin. Type the following

powercfg /hibernate off


#11 britechguy

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 12:11 PM

Let's not even mention that adding hibernation to the power settings is located in the same place as it has been for decades: Choose what the power button does in Power settings.

These are the kind of complaints that spring from a combination of ignorance and out and out laziness. A two second web search or BC site search answers how to add or remove options from the power menu.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1703, Build 15063

       

    A man's worst difficulties begin when he is able to do as he likes.
              ~ Thomas H. Huxley (1876)

 


#12 giantatx

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 08:20 AM

OK, maybe this screenshot will demonstrate my point: 

 

11hrl8z.jpg

 

 

Anyway, I've solved none of my problems and now I have a visual migraine from reading lots of links with useless information. 


Edited by giantatx, 21 April 2017 - 08:30 AM.


#13 britechguy

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 09:01 AM

What point?  That's how you turn Fast Startup and the Hibernate features on and off (along with a couple of others).

 

None of this is rocket science and every blessed thing you've asked about has been asked and answered (and often by me, but plenty of others, too) on this very forum.

 

You have not given a single example of how what you're trying to do is not working when the usual instructions are followed.  Not one.  No one can assist if something is indeed broken in a complete absence of information about what's not working as it should.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1703, Build 15063

       

    A man's worst difficulties begin when he is able to do as he likes.
              ~ Thomas H. Huxley (1876)

 


#14 giantatx

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 09:05 AM

Well, doesn't the image posted demonstrate that the article linked to doesn't apply to my system?

 

Just to clarify:  I've clicked through to the relevant settings on my own computer and compared them to the page in the link.  My computer does NOT have the options suggested.  THEREFORE, I can't change anything.  NOW, I'm stuck.

 

This seems to be a major problem as there's lot of discussion all over the web with many other users having to deal with the same B$.


Edited by giantatx, 21 April 2017 - 09:34 AM.


#15 britechguy

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 09:34 AM

Well, doesn't the image posted demonstrate that the article linked to doesn't apply to my system?

 

No, it doesn't.   This is standard operating procedure for changing these settings under Windows 10.  Your system has Windows 10 and, unless you haven't mentioned it, is fully under your own control rather than being centrally administered in some organization.  You'd change your settings for Fast Startup precisely in the way illustrated.

 

There has also been more than one link.  If you're having issues then please be specific about what they are and what well-documented steps to fix them are not working.  You are being intentionally vague, which certainly doesn't help you nor anyone who'd be willing to offer assistance.

 

It would also help to know what version and build number of Windows 10 you're using.  From your screen shot it either appears that your machine is centrally administered, which can be set up to disallow access to certain settings, or there is some error in the installation of Windows 10 itself, in which case my first steps would be:

 


Edited by britechguy, 21 April 2017 - 09:38 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1703, Build 15063

       

    A man's worst difficulties begin when he is able to do as he likes.
              ~ Thomas H. Huxley (1876)

 





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