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Network Bridging


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#1 Elendil

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Posted 05 September 2006 - 04:13 PM

I've googled this and similar entries to answer my little curiosity; however, it seems to me that there is no point to a network bridge. To help a busy, confused freshman, would anyone like to explain what is the importance of a network bridge and its benefits (also downfalls if you don't mind).
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#2 Klinkaroo

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Posted 06 September 2006 - 09:19 PM

Well not really sure what the question is but I am supposing you would like to know what a network bridge is?

#3 Elendil

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 05:28 PM

Yes, that is what I'm wondering.
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#4 boopme

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 06:58 PM

A network bridge connects multiple network segments (network domains) at the data link layer. It is sometimes called a network switch, and it works by using bridging. Traffic from one network is forwarded through it to another network. The bridge simply does what its name entails, by connecting two sides from adjacent networks.

A repeater is a similar device that connects network segments at the physical layer. An Ethernet hub is a type of repeater.

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#5 Elendil

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 05:35 PM

So, it doesn't speed up your internet connection if you bridge two networks?
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#6 Klinkaroo

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Posted 09 September 2006 - 09:58 AM

No, all it really does is connect the two networks together.




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