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How Do I Increase My Home Wifi Network's Speed?


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14 replies to this topic

#1 Hal06

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 04:39 PM

Hello. My home wifi network has a download of 44 mbs and an upload of 12 mbs. How do I increase the network speed, especially on the upload?

 

Thanks.

 



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#2 smax013

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 08:20 PM

Hello. My home wifi network has a download of 44 mbs and an upload of 12 mbs. How do I increase the network speed, especially on the upload?
 
Thanks.


What you are really asking? Do you want to increase your WiFi network speed independent of your Internet connection speed from your ISP? Or do you really want to increase your Internet connection speed?

If it is the former, then are those speeds you list when you are transferring files from one computer to another computer (or other device) on your network? Or are those your Internet connection speeds as tested at a site like Speedtest.net? If it is the later, then your are really likely asking about how to speed up your Internet connection as your WiFi network likely can handle faster speeds (for example, if you only had an 802.11g network, you almost definitely would not be getting 44 Mbps download speeds even though the maximum "speed" 802.11g can do is 54 Mbps...realistically, you can only max out at about 20 +/- Mbps with 802.11g to my knowledge...so that likely mean you have at least an 802.11n network, which is capable of better than 44 Mbps).

If it is the latter, then what level of service are you paying for? More than likely that is your limitation from what I am seeing, especially on the upload speed...but could also be your limitation on the download. If so, keep in mind that for most home broadband Internet connection, the upload speed will be DRAMATICALLY lower than the download speed. This typically means that you either need to pay a LOT of money for a very fast home level broadband connection that will likely get download speeds in excess of 100 Mbps to get better speed than what you have for upload (this, of course, assuming your ISP offers faster connections that improve the upload speed)...or switch to business level connection, which again will likely cost you significant money. As a case in point, I have cable Internet that gets downloads of between 80 to 90 Mbps, but I still only get upload speeds similar to yours of about 12 Mbps.

#3 cooljay

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 12:23 PM

Every ISP has a web page where you can test the speed and see if you are getting the speed you are paying for.

 

Also, I read - and I have to say I have never done this, somebody knowledgeable about this might want to weigh in here - you can actually change your DNS server address! Contrary to what I always thought, we are not stuck with our ISP's DNS.



#4 iMacg3

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 12:52 PM

What type of router do you have? 802.11a, b, g, n, or AC? Some types are slower than others. N and AC are the fastest. If you have an a or b, you probably want to upgrade to a G, N, or AC.

What Internet speed is your ISP providing?


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#5 Hal06

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 03:42 PM

My ISP promises upload of 20 mbs. Not sure how to tell what type of router. It's the standard one, I think, from Time Warner Cable.



#6 iMacg3

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 06:28 PM

If your ISP says you'll get 20mbs, you'll actually never get 20mbs. You will always get a lower number. To me, your speeds sound about right. 


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#7 smax013

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 02:00 AM

If your ISP says you'll get 20mbs, you'll actually never get 20mbs. You will always get a lower number. To me, your speeds sound about right.


To my knowledge, if your ISP says your service will provide certain speeds, they are obligated to provide those speeds, including upload speeds, on a consistent basis. In other words, there might be occasions where you might not get those speeds due to some problem with their network, etc, but the majority (if not vast majority) of the time, you should get those speeds.

Now, it is important to keep in mind that the speeds that they say they will provide ARE NOT what is traditionally considered as Internet speeds. The speeds they are "guaranteed" to provide is strictly from your home to their main switching station (i.e. the place where you leave the ISPs network and enter the actual Internet). Once you are fully on the Internet, there are a number of factors that the ISP cannot control (i.e. the Internet server you are connected to is overloaded or poorly designed and cannot supply enough throughput/speed to the people connected to it; one of the Internet routers or servers your connect is being routed to is experiencing problems or is overloaded; etc), so their guarantee no longer applies.

If you are consistently not getting the speeds you are paying your ISP for, then you can file a complain with the FCC is memory serves. Of course, there is no guarantee that they will do much with that complaint.

Edited by smax013, 18 April 2017 - 02:01 AM.


#8 smax013

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 02:08 AM

My ISP promises upload of 20 mbs. Not sure how to tell what type of router. It's the standard one, I think, from Time Warner Cable.


How are you testing your "speed"?

As I noted in my just previous post, the ISP is only guaranteeing your speed from your home to their main switching station. Once your connection leaves their network and enters the "regular" Internet, then all bets are off. As a result of this, ideally you want to test a connection that is as close to all on your ISP as possible.

If you are using speedtest.net, then you will want to try to select a test service that is hosted by your ISP and that is located as physically as close to your as possible. This increases the chance that the connection will only be on their network or almost totally on their network and be a closest representation of the speed they are truly providing relative to their guarantee/what you are paying for. For example, I am on Comcast and I use a Comcast test server that is maybe 50 miles or so from me as the crow flies. The further the test server is from your physically, the more likely are now going through networks/devices that your ISP does not control and thus cannot guarantee.

Some ISPs have their own testing service through your account. If so, then use that.

#9 toofarnorth

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 04:23 PM

Hello

 

What speed do you get if you connect with a cable?

tfn



#10 harry12

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 05:39 PM

I see a lot of good advice going on here, however, I can't see much sense in speed testing when you have

definate set of figures provided by your ISP.  20 mbps is pretty high.  The issue is whether your internal

network, meaning your devices inside your router/modem can support the speeds you are looking for.

 

As far as the DNS comment, if you have access to your router setup, yes of course you can change your

DNS.  There are plenty available, you just need to find them.   If your router is built into a Time Warner

Cable Modem (actually probably a PACE  or Arriss modem) and it provides in home wireless service, then

you can change the DNS.  



#11 smax013

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 02:18 PM

20 mbps is pretty high.  The issue is whether your internal
network, meaning your devices inside your router/modem can support the speeds you are looking for.


The original posters listed their download speed as 44 Mbps and their upload at 12 Mbps with the upload supposedly being 20 Mbps. If the internal network can handle 44 Mbps for download, then it is not the problem and should easily handle 20 Mbps upload.

#12 Neil_Hines

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 04:06 AM

Thanks for suggesting friends about how to increase Wifi network speed. Here in this article, you will get more knowledge about how to boost wifi signal and also how to improve performance. :-)



#13 jtphenom

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 09:26 PM

My Internet speeds on a Comcast 100 Mpbs connection are 43 down and 6 up! Now that's wireless; I haven't tested wired yet, but to me that seems really poor. I'm using speedtest.net and using the closest server they have available.

I wonder if I can get my bill cut in half!



#14 iMacg3

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 09:18 AM

jtphenom, please start your own topic in the forums to avoid confusion.

Thank you!


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#15 smax013

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 07:36 PM

My Internet speeds on a Comcast 100 Mpbs connection are 43 down and 6 up! Now that's wireless; I haven't tested wired yet, but to me that seems really poor. I'm using speedtest.net and using the closest server they have available.
I wonder if I can get my bill cut in half!


With you using WiFi, there are a number of factors that are NOT under the control of Comcast that could affect your Internet connection speed while on WiFi. If you believe there is an issue and want some help with it, as suggested you should start your own thread as your issue may not be the same as what the original poster of this thread was dealing with even if might look the same.




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