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How big of a risk is it building a PC for the first time?


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#1 Miguel_92

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 06:54 PM

I have been searching for a PC for a number of weeks now and i am starting to notice a problem with with pre built machines, they either have an amazing chip and psu or the graphics card, motherboard and ram are beyond mediocre and they are charging unreal figures for such tame machines. But if i cannot find a suitable machine i wanted to build one, but i have been told that it's basically a terrifying experience beyond belief and it's not for the faint hearted. Is that true? Because i have never built one before and i think before too long i'll have to. I'd like to build a gaming one mainly, with high end 16GB ram,i7-7700K, 650w PSU, gaming motherboard and a decent 4GB graphics card. The only thing i can't source so far is a case.

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Skylake-Motherboard-3200Mhz-Vengeance-Pre-Built/dp/B01DDJOL86/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1491782202&sr=8-5&keywords=intel+bundle

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/d/Power-Supplies/Corsair-9020098-VS650-ATX-EPS-PLUS-Unit/B00PGUSEBG/ref=sr_1_1?s=computers&ie=UTF8&qid=1491782300&sr=1-1&keywords=650w+psu

 

Just example of some of the parts. Thanks.


Edited by Miguel_92, 09 April 2017 - 06:59 PM.


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#2 Just_One_Question

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 07:01 PM

It's not that hard. It involves doing research, although you seem to know a big part of your stuff already. Basically, make sure that the parts fit and are compatible with eachother and don't forget about details such as applying thermal paste to the CPU before installing it.
Anyways, don't worry, have fun & good luck! :)

Edited by Just_One_Question, 09 April 2017 - 07:01 PM.


#3 RolandJS

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 07:12 PM

Keep all receipts with the packaging for at least 3 years, warranty claims past 30 days often go to the respective manufacturers rather than the places of purchase.  When bench building - thoroughly ground yourself to avoid electrostatic charges.


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#4 Miguel_92

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 07:23 PM

Thanks for the rapid replies. Like i said, i am starting to feel more angry than down regarding research due to how bad the pre built machines are that i have found online. They are rife with cost cutting mesures it seems, especially on the graphics cards and i have been told that even a decent gaming board is at least £100 (i've seen pre built ones with £45 boards in, which doesn't seem great lol). I'm mostly scared about damaging the board or the chip while fitting it, but i'd like to know what you think of the bundle i posted above and if you think it's worth the money. I did find a graphics card, but it isn't made anymore so i would like to find one that's capable of playing GTA 5 on ultra (i want to use the mods lol) and the same applies to Fallout 4. Thanks.


Edited by Miguel_92, 09 April 2017 - 07:25 PM.


#5 MDD1963

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 08:04 PM

If planning on some sort of gaming system, the search must begin with the GPU, either an RX480 or GTX1060, minimum.... (in my opinion). Althgough while waiting on my GTX1060 to arrive, I did actually play both Battlefield 1 and Doom on integrated video from the 7700K and found both semi-playable...which was pleasantly surprising.

 

As to going Ryzen R7 vs. R5 /X370/B350 or i7-7700k/Z270 (quite a few titles far better on hyperthreading, so I would rule out the i5 if possible), I will leave that to you and your research...


Asus Z270A Prime/7700K/32 GB DDR4-3200/GTX1060


#6 jonuk76

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 09:36 PM

Building a PC is not hard and there is a lot of information out there. Youtube is a good place to look because there are many step by step guides.  E.g. https://www.youtube.com/user/pcpartpicker

 

Familiarise yourself with the motherboard manual and be prepared to refer to it while building. It contains lots of useful information like which DIMM slots to use first, and header locations.

 

Wear an anti static wrist strap if possible, and try to handle parts as minimally as you can, by their edges.  Pay special attention to installing the CPU - taking note of any alignment markers etc. Intel's LGA sockets are particularly delicate, and extra care is needed with these, as bent pins generally means a written off motherboard.

 

For the GPU this article has some recommendations for different budgets and resolutions, and I generally agree with them - http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/best-gpus,review-33382.html


Edited by jonuk76, 09 April 2017 - 09:39 PM.

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#7 RolandJS

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 08:43 AM

Don't be too hard or angry with manufacturers' and/or Point-of-Sale places' pre-builts.  Many customers want the cheapest, lowest cost, built by the lowest bidder, computers -- and the makers and builders are simply bowing to overwhelming customer desires.  Some customers, like you, want to pay a quality price for a quality computer -- continue searching  :)


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#8 MichelBevan

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 12:31 PM

Yes, there is two type of customer all over the world. Type one like you, want to a quality product with the quality price. Another type is always searching low cost with high quality! Keep searching  :bounce:



#9 Miguel_92

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 02:00 PM

Building a PC is not hard and there is a lot of information out there. Youtube is a good place to look because there are many step by step guides.  E.g. https://www.youtube.com/user/pcpartpicker

 

Familiarise yourself with the motherboard manual and be prepared to refer to it while building. It contains lots of useful information like which DIMM slots to use first, and header locations.

 

Wear an anti static wrist strap if possible, and try to handle parts as minimally as you can, by their edges.  Pay special attention to installing the CPU - taking note of any alignment markers etc. Intel's LGA sockets are particularly delicate, and extra care is needed with these, as bent pins generally means a written off motherboard.

 

For the GPU this article has some recommendations for different budgets and resolutions, and I generally agree with them - http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/best-gpus,review-33382.html

I think in the bundle i want comes with the CPU on the board already and i think the RAM etc is also put on there, but i could be wrong lol. The only thing i am scared about is the static tbh and luckily for me i'm not a heavy handed thug when it comes to delicate things like computer parts lol, because i know how sensitive and easily breakable they are. In my mind i know i can do it, but i really wish the machines i've seen so far weren't so mediocre regarding certain bits and only someone who didn't know anything about computers would buy them for the extortionate prices they are on sale for. I'll keep on looking, but i did find a PC yesterday with an i7, but i'd need to buy the 16gb of ram and a better graphics card. https://www.expertec.co.uk/core-i7-7700-kaby-lake-7th-gen-gaming-pc-4gb-gtx-1050-ti-windows-7-pro.html?utm_source=google_shopping&gclid=CMSQt-zJmtMCFcLnGwod7cMFrQ https://www.freshtechsolutions.co.uk/intel-i7-7700k-1tb-8gb-ddr4-gtx-1050ti-4gb-punisher-computer-gaming-pc.html?gclid=CM_jwPPKmtMCFRGdGwodQnEJhw i found those two and i'd like to hear some opinions please. Anyone got a good graphics card that can run Fallout 4 and GTA 5 on Ultra settings without an issue? Thanks.


Edited by Miguel_92, 10 April 2017 - 02:17 PM.





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