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Motherboard not recognising Graphics Card


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#1 Old-Monk

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 04:31 AM

Hello,


I've been having problems with getting my ASUS M5A78L V2 motherboard to recognise the AMD HD7850 2GB DDR5 graphics card (manufactured by Sapphire) for about a year now. Everytime the card is connected, there's nothing on the display beyond the windows screen. On the other hand, the system is working well with no graphics card involved. I've tried enlisting the help of a computer professional who tried to use other cards but to no avail. We've also tried using VGA to HDMI and VGA to DVI converters but they have not worked. I've been using an 8GB ram supported by a AMD FX6300 processor.

The PC was assembled in 2014 and worked fine till last year when the power source melted. A new power source was used which is when the problems arose. Could the problem be because of the new power source or because of the motherboard since no cards are working? The computer professional says it could be the latter but I'm not entirely sure.

Help is greatly appreciated since as you would've guessed from the above paragraphs, I'm not an expert myself.



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#2 jonuk76

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 05:55 AM

Could you clarify what "there's nothing on the display beyond the windows screen" means?  Are you saying it loads Windows with the graphics card installed?

 

You mention the power supply "melted".  PSU failure can (if unlucky, and especially if using a poorly designed PSU) damage any connected components.

 

Did the person you had test your computer check whether your graphics card worked in another machine?

 

What is the make and model of PSU used in the machine currently?


Edited by jonuk76, 09 April 2017 - 06:00 AM.

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#3 Old-Monk

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 06:27 AM

Could you clarify what "there's nothing on the display beyond the windows screen" means?  Are you saying it loads Windows with the graphics card installed?

 

You mention the power supply "melted".  PSU failure can (if unlucky, and especially if using a poorly designed PSU) damage any connected components.

 

Did the person you had test your computer check whether your graphics card worked in another machine?

 

What is the make and model of PSU used in the machine currently?

 

I use Windows 10 and it loads up till the windows logo. Cannot view the login section.

 

My computer gave out smoke from the rear section, with a weird smell. That's what I meant by "melted". The PSU was replaced after the incident which is when the graphics card ceased to function.

 

No, the graphics card was not tested in another computer but other graphics cards were tested on mine. None worked. Absolutely none at all.

 

I'm not entirely sure about the make and model of the PSU, I'll try to obtain information on that front ASAP.



#4 jonuk76

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 11:15 AM

OK if the motherboard was not recognising the card or if the card had failed completely, I would not expect it to output anything *at all*.  Typically the monitor would show no input detected and stay blank.  The fact it is failing to show the sign in screen after displaying the Windows logo tells us that the card is being detected, it is able to output at least a basic display, and is working at some level.

 

I think it would be useful to rule out corruption of Windows drivers, to determine if it is indeed a hardware problem.

 

Does it load normally in Safe Mode with the graphics card installed? Safe mode is not always possible to launch using the key combination at boot time (Shift & F8) because some machines just boot too fast.  Here are some alternative ways to boot in safe mode.

 

Alternatively you might like to try downloading a live Linux distribution (e.g. Mint or Ubuntu), installing it to a USB drive ideally, or otherwise a DVD, and seeing if that is able to boot to a desktop.

 

The PSU details are helpful because you really need a 400w+ PSU for that CPU and video card.


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#5 Old-Monk

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 02:16 AM

OK if the motherboard was not recognising the card or if the card had failed completely, I would not expect it to output anything *at all*.  Typically the monitor would show no input detected and stay blank.  The fact it is failing to show the sign in screen after displaying the Windows logo tells us that the card is being detected, it is able to output at least a basic display, and is working at some level.

 

I think it would be useful to rule out corruption of Windows drivers, to determine if it is indeed a hardware problem.

 

Does it load normally in Safe Mode with the graphics card installed? Safe mode is not always possible to launch using the key combination at boot time (Shift & F8) because some machines just boot too fast.  Here are some alternative ways to boot in safe mode.

 

Alternatively you might like to try downloading a live Linux distribution (e.g. Mint or Ubuntu), installing it to a USB drive ideally, or otherwise a DVD, and seeing if that is able to boot to a desktop.

 

The PSU details are helpful because you really need a 400w+ PSU for that CPU and video card.

The PSU is iBall Marathon 500w.

 

The professional is quite certain that the problem is down to the motherboard and not due to the card or PSU, and I don't know to insert videocards by myself. He gives two options - to replace the motherboard or to fix the existing one. Which one would you suggest? If it is the former, do you have a few motherboards in mind that would be able to work with the given specs and aren't very expensive?



#6 jonuk76

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 06:58 AM

Hello, that PSU looks like it's a budget item for the Indian market. Not familiar with it but the signs aren't good ("peak" power rating @ 500w for example).

 

Fixing modern motherboards is often not viable IMO due to their complexity vs cost of replacement. Some people replace things like capacitors if visibly damaged (requires expert soldering skills). But if damage is not easily detected then the usual course of action is to replace.

 

If the motherboard is indeed the problem then if your system accepts a full ATX board, the Asus M5A97 LE R2.0 looks reasonable value as one of the cheapest boards. If limited to Micro ATX the Asus M5A78L-M USB3 is similar to the one you are using at the moment.

 

I would still suggest attempting to rule out other causes first and perhaps you could work with this technician on that.


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