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High CPU Temperature. HELP!


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#1 Cawickeng

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Posted 07 April 2017 - 11:43 PM

Hi guys,

 

I’m in a bit of a panic at the moment.  So I checked my CPU temperature using HWiNFO64 and it showed unusually high temperature spikes.  I do not have anything on except for that program.  The usual temperature is 39C but occasionally it spikes up to 67C.  I thought I might be infected, so I scanned using Malwarebytes and the temperature went up to 77C!  I checked the Task Manager and Malwarebytes Services was using up 100% of my CPU!  Anyway, I ran CCleaner registry and temporary files cleaner as well as Avast Antivirus. No virus.  I did install Kaspersky Internet Security briefly last week but immediately uninstalled it.  I have heard that people using this software have had huge CPU usage. 

 

I am using an MSI laptop, and just recently got a Logitech G502 mouse, Z88 MechanicalEagle keyboard and connected them via a USB Hub. I don’t think that would be the problem though.

 

Thank you in advance for any help that you can give me.

 

I have attached my HijackThis log below:

 

Mod Edit:  Removed malware log detail, not allowed/used in this forum - Hamluis.


Edited by hamluis, 08 April 2017 - 10:06 AM.


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#2 clayto

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 04:43 AM

This is way above my head but if you have not tried it you may get some extra info with WhySoSlow which monitors and comments on CPU usage, temperature and more -- in a simple presentation I can understand.



#3 Cawickeng

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 06:23 AM

This is way above my head but if you have not tried it you may get some extra info with WhySoSlow which monitors and comments on CPU usage, temperature and more -- in a simple presentation I can understand.

It's relatively the same info.  I have attached my cpu temp. By the way, my laptop is very new (about 7 months old).  The cpu peak that you see in this image occurred when I was watching a video on PotPlayer.  It was a random temperature spike (70C).  This never happened last week/month.  At most, it reached mid 50s.

 

Does the keyboard/mouse make the laptop hotter?

 

http://imgur.com/a/6VMjC



#4 Hareen

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 08:25 AM

Physical issues at times. Probably dust and improper angle ( which is a case in my place most of the times). Surrounding ambient temperature also can be a reason (It is now for my system my damn thing is hardly one month old and lags during daytime.) 

 

Do a general soft and hard clean. Soft clean means clearing cache, repairing any improper installations, de-fragmenting in case of HDD only. Hard clean means dusting and general physical maintenance. The thing is probably under warranty so you can ask the company technician to do it for free(perhaps).



#5 britechguy

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 08:35 AM

You need to look up the actual specs of the cpu/apu your machine uses as far as operating temperature specs.

 

There are plenty where spiking into the 70s at full load is not at all unusual.  cpu-world.com or your cpu/apu maker's website should give you the maximum safe operating temperature information.

 

Not that I'm saying your particular concerns are unfounded, but I am amazed at how many instances of unfounded panic I've seen on this forum about operating temperatures.  Most processors these days run significantly warmer than they used to at one time.  Given the amount of processing power packed into tinier and tinier spaces this is not particularly surprising.

 

Far be it from me to be an enforcer type, but it is clearly stated with a notice at the top of this forum that HiJackThis logs are not to be posted here.


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         ~ Commenter TheCruyffGurn on the The Guardian website, 8/13/2014

 

              

 


#6 dc3

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 09:05 AM

Overheating issues usually are not caused by malware or the results of being infected.  For this reason the HJT log is not relevant to this problem.

 

39C is nice and cool, 67C is a little high, but it is not dangerously high.  If you post the model of this MSI laptop we can post the maximum temperature for your CPU.  With a laptop as new as you have posted that this is there shouldn't be enough accumulated dust or pet hair to impede its circulation.  Other contributors to overheating could be where it is being used and the ambient temperature in the room where it is being used.  I'm sure you are aware that a laptop should only used on a flat surface which will not impede its circulation.  It should not be used while setting on bedding or one's lap.  As you have seen in the scans you ran the temperature can be effected by needed system resource to run these scans.

 

There are good reasons for Bleeping Computer's stance on registry cleaners.  The following is courtesy of quietman7, one of our Global Moderators.

 

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:

Why you should not use Registry Cleaners and Optimization Tools

There are numerous programs which purport to improve system performance, make repairs and tune up a computer. Many of them include such features as a registry cleaner, registry optimizer, disk optimizer, etc. Some of these programs even incorporate optimization and registry cleaning features alongside anti-malware capabilities. These registry cleaners and optimizers claim to speed up your computer by finding and removing orphaned and corrupt registry entries that are responsible for slowing down system performance. There is no statistical evidence to back such claims. Advertisements to do so are borderline scams intended to goad users into using an unnecessary and potential dangerous product.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#7 britechguy

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 09:28 AM

I just looked up the specs for the AMD A8 that's running in my "cheapo laptop".  The maximum operating temperature is 70° C.  Under most conditions my minimum temperature is right around 50 and under moderate load in the low 60s.   It can spike very to or even a hair over the stated maximum if it's under really heavy load for an extended period of time.

 

The critical temperature for this processor is 115° C, which is when either throttling or shutdown would occur.  Not that one ever wants to get or should get any near to critical temperature, but as you can see it's generally a great deal above the maximum operating temperature.

 

If you want to keep an eye on your temperatures a good little utility for this is Core Temp.  One of the things I happen to like about it is that it shows you the critical temperature for your processor (as Tj. Max).  They also seem to be pretty good about keeping their database accurate and I've seen some temperature monitors that were grossly off, usually way too low, causing unnecessary panic.  This is the reason I always suggest looking up the actual specs at the processor's website or on cpu-world.com.  The specs are what tell you what the maximum expected operating temperature is and, often but not always, what the critical temperature is.


Brian AKA Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

 

     In a modern society where everyone thinks their opinion deserves to be heard nothing annoys me more than individuals who mistake their personal preferences for fact.

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#8 Cawickeng

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 06:25 PM

Physical issues at times. Probably dust and improper angle ( which is a case in my place most of the times). Surrounding ambient temperature also can be a reason (It is now for my system my damn thing is hardly one month old and lags during daytime.) 

 

Do a general soft and hard clean. Soft clean means clearing cache, repairing any improper installations, de-fragmenting in case of HDD only. Hard clean means dusting and general physical maintenance. The thing is probably under warranty so you can ask the company technician to do it for free(perhaps).

Yes I have tried all manner of 'soft cleans'.  I was afraid that it had to do with the hardware.



#9 Cawickeng

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 10:35 PM

You need to look up the actual specs of the cpu/apu your machine uses as far as operating temperature specs.

 

There are plenty where spiking into the 70s at full load is not at all unusual.  cpu-world.com or your cpu/apu maker's website should give you the maximum safe operating temperature information.

 

Not that I'm saying your particular concerns are unfounded, but I am amazed at how many instances of unfounded panic I've seen on this forum about operating temperatures.  Most processors these days run significantly warmer than they used to at one time.  Given the amount of processing power packed into tinier and tinier spaces this is not particularly surprising.

 

Far be it from me to be an enforcer type, but it is clearly stated with a notice at the top of this forum that HiJackThis logs are not to be posted here.

My cpu is the i7 6700HQ and the datasheet says that the Tjunction is 100C.

 

The problem for me is not that it is 70C.  It is the sudden high temperatures. I haven't gotten <30C idle temperatures since I bought this computer.

 

And yes, sorry.  I only noticed the notice after I created this thread.



#10 Cawickeng

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 10:41 PM

Overheating issues usually are not caused by malware or the results of being infected.  For this reason the HJT log is not relevant to this problem.

 

39C is nice and cool, 67C is a little high, but it is not dangerously high.  If you post the model of this MSI laptop we can post the maximum temperature for your CPU.  With a laptop as new as you have posted that this is there shouldn't be enough accumulated dust or pet hair to impede its circulation.  Other contributors to overheating could be where it is being used and the ambient temperature in the room where it is being used.  I'm sure you are aware that a laptop should only used on a flat surface which will not impede its circulation.  It should not be used while setting on bedding or one's lap.  As you have seen in the scans you ran the temperature can be effected by needed system resource to run these scans.

 

There are good reasons for Bleeping Computer's stance on registry cleaners.  The following is courtesy of quietman7, one of our Global Moderators.

 

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:

Why you should not use Registry Cleaners and Optimization Tools

There are numerous programs which purport to improve system performance, make repairs and tune up a computer. Many of them include such features as a registry cleaner, registry optimizer, disk optimizer, etc. Some of these programs even incorporate optimization and registry cleaning features alongside anti-malware capabilities. These registry cleaners and optimizers claim to speed up your computer by finding and removing orphaned and corrupt registry entries that are responsible for slowing down system performance. There is no statistical evidence to back such claims. Advertisements to do so are borderline scams intended to goad users into using an unnecessary and potential dangerous product.

My laptop is an MSI Leopard Pro GP62 6QF, the CPU is i7 6700HQ.  The ambient temperature of the room should be around 25C (Autumn in Australia), and I do own two cats.

 

Actually when I bought my keyboard, I moved my laptop to an elevated platform however the laptop's feet are BOTH standing on this platform (i.e. it is flat and there is a space underneath the laptop).

 

As for CCleaner's Registry Cleaner, I'm only using it because it has helped with a problem in the past when my desktop couldn't access the Internet. Cleaning the registry helped to fix this issue.


Edited by Cawickeng, 08 April 2017 - 10:42 PM.


#11 britechguy

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 09:33 AM

I don't know why you are so concerned, really.

 

The idle temperatures on my machine have been in the mid-50s ever since I got it.  I have never, ever gotten below the high 40s even if I'm running the thing in a frigid room.

 

Certain processors run warmer than others.  If this is a sudden change then the only two things I can attribute it to are dust buildup, which you state is not the case, or that the thermal paste that allows heat transfer between the CPU and the heat sink that surrounds it has been compromised.  That's what I'd check next.

 

As far as I'm concerned, and my history with many machines has borne out for me, so long as the processor is running below the maximum "within normal limits" temperature at all times there is nothing to worry oneself about.  These things are designed to operate within a range, and if you're within that range you are within normal limits.  Just keep an eye out that you're not exceeding the high end of that range.  Also, if you are by any significant amount the machine itself will give you clear indications of that fact up to and including shutting itself down with no warning.  If performance throttling or thermal shut downs occur then you've got a real problem.


Brian AKA Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

 

     In a modern society where everyone thinks their opinion deserves to be heard nothing annoys me more than individuals who mistake their personal preferences for fact.

         ~ Commenter TheCruyffGurn on the The Guardian website, 8/13/2014

 

              

 


#12 dc3

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 09:35 AM

I did a quick Google to find out if there is a overheating issue with the i7-6700HQ processor, by the amount of post regarding overheating issues at the Intel website I would have to say that this is not unusual for the CPU.  I read posts where the CPU was running anywhere from 30C to 91C.  A representative of Intel (Amy) states that as long as the computer isn't freezing or shutting down it is fine and that the processor has thermal limiting which will shut the processor down if it overheats.  Say what?!? :blink:   They go on to suggest that if you are concerned you could download and run the Intel Processor Diagnostic Tool.  This information was posted by a Intel Corporation and can be found here.  There are two Intel Websites which have large number of people asking questions about this CPU overheating.  It seems that Intel's suggestion regarding this is to live with it.  Personally I find their lackadaisical attitude a little disturbing.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#13 britechguy

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 09:43 AM

dc3 wrote:  "A representative of Intel (Amy) states that as long as the computer isn't freezing or shutting down it is fine and that the processor has thermal limiting which will shut the processor down if it overheats.  Say what?!?"

 

Well, I have to side with Amy.   If you have a computer that's purring along, and has been purring along, with a processor that's been doing so at a given temperature that is within the allowed operating range you do not have a problem.   If you are seeing a sudden change you likely have a change of some sort that you might wish to address.  If this is not a change, at least that you know of, you don't.

 

I have seen the same processors running at significantly different temperatures in different hardware, and this is not surprising.  Laptops generally run much warmer than desktops do with the same processor.

 

People need to stop panicking when a computer is running perfectly and the temperature at which it's running is within the normal range of operation.  The amount of time and energy expended on this mystifies me, particularly since virtually any processor in existence today will protect itself if something has gone horribly wrong.  

 

But to each his or her own.  For myself, after checking that I'm within normal limits, it's on to the next issue or just having fun.


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     In a modern society where everyone thinks their opinion deserves to be heard nothing annoys me more than individuals who mistake their personal preferences for fact.

         ~ Commenter TheCruyffGurn on the The Guardian website, 8/13/2014

 

              

 


#14 dc3

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 10:20 AM

What you are proposing is that if it's still running it's OK.  This implies that the safe operating temperature is anything between dead cold to extremes where the computer will shut down to protect the processor.  I most certainly am not panicking as you have suggested.  My issue is with their lack of acknowledgement that this processor does run at high temperatures, especially in laptops and notebooks, and their tendency to gloss over this rather than address it as being normal.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#15 britechguy

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 10:59 AM

Dan,

 

        I have great respect for you, and really have no desire to argue with you, but the very bit that you quoted boils down to a direct "acknowledgement that this processor does run at high temperatures."   It may not be in the form you'd prefer, but the message is crystal clear.

 

        The safe running temperature is whatever the chip manufacturer says it is, and in the specific instance being discussed here it is running within normal limits.  I don't know what you want for me to say that I haven't.  I've acknowledged the change and the only thing I can think of that might be checkable.  I still wouldn't be tearing apart my laptop to check this if the temperature remains firmly below the 70 degrees C under maximum stress conditions.

 

        By the way, I was not suggesting that you are/were panicking, but the original poster certainly is based on the very subject of this thread.  His or hers is not the first with a "the sky is falling" tone with regard to a processor that's not running anything more than on the warmer end of normal when stressed.

 

        I just wish that more of us who are comfortable saying it, and I'm not saying anything about what you should be comfortable saying - that's your call, would come out and say, "You have nothing to worry about if your machine is operating nowhere near the top of the permitted operating range except when stressed, even if it's running warmer than it did when new."  Most will creep up some, especially laptops, since tearing them apart to give them a thorough cleaning is almost never done and is seldom necessary provided cleaning the vents keeps things within the manufacturer's designated temperature range.


Brian AKA Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

 

     In a modern society where everyone thinks their opinion deserves to be heard nothing annoys me more than individuals who mistake their personal preferences for fact.

         ~ Commenter TheCruyffGurn on the The Guardian website, 8/13/2014

 

              

 





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