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Slow connection


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#1 Dark Magician Girl

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 02:34 AM

Kindle Fire HDX 8.9

 

2.4 GHz

 

Download: 84.79 

Upload: 14.69 

 

5 GHz

 

Download: 111.93 

Upload: 12.14

 

Dell All-In-One

 

2.4 GHz

 

Download: 57.31

Upload: 12.07

 

5 GHz

 

Download: 240.17

Upload: 12.00

 

Wired

 

Download: 240.12

Upload: 12.21

 

I get 200 Mbps download and 10 Mbps upload from my internet service provider. 

 

The Dell All-In-One gets 57.31 Mbps when using the 2.4 GHz band and 240.17 Mbps download using the 5 GHz band. The former is quite slow for a 200 Mbps connection. I understand that the 2.4 GHz band suffers from more interference than the 5 GHz band, but is it normal for the speeds between the two bands to be so great? I also wonder why the Kindle Fire HDX 8.9 gets only 110 Mbps, whereas the Dell All-In-One gets 240.17 Mbps on the 5 GHz band. 



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#2 smax013

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 08:57 AM

It is likely a combination of WiFi chipset in the Amazon Fire tablet vs the Dell All-in-one as well as "environmental" factors (such as distance to router from device, WiFi channel used, possible sources of interference primarily for 2.4 GHz, other WiFi networks in the area, etc).

For example, it appears the Fire only supports 802.11n while it is possible that the Dell has a 802.11ac chipset (you did not give enough info on the Dell to know). This only matters if your router/WiFi access point supports 802.11ac.

Or it could be a function of what level of MIMO support both the Fire and Dell have as well as the router.

FWIW, you likely will never notice any difference in the download speeds for normal tasks like browsing the web, checking email, streaming videos, etc. You would only notice it when downloading large files, which are much more likely to do on the computer than the tablet (with the except of system/OS updates).

#3 harry12

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 10:57 AM

The Kindle Fire HDX 8.9 is a third generation Fire, and it supports 802.11a, b, g, and n.  

I would be interesting to know what kind of router you are using.

Your Kindle speeds are relatively consistant with a,b,g,n,  with a little over on the 2.4 side.

However, your output is probably about as good as it gets for the Fire 8.9.  



#4 Dark Magician Girl

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 11:18 PM

The modem is an Arris SURFboard (16 download and 4 upload streams) and the router is a Netgear AC1750 (R6400). 

 

The Dell All-In-One supports 802.11ac. 

 

All speeds were tested one room away from the router. 



#5 harry12

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 11:44 AM

The modem is an Arris SURFboard (16 download and 4 upload streams) and the router is a Netgear AC1750 (R6400). 

 

The Dell All-In-One supports 802.11ac. 

 

All speeds were tested one room away from the router. 

The Dell will run ac on the 5ghz channel, b/g/n on the 2.4 ghz channel.

The final thing to check is what is you ISP providing you... if your ISP is providing 300 ghz,

then you Dell is right in spec.

 

 

Nice router,  am moving up to the (R6250) this tuesday,



#6 Dark Magician Girl

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 03:05 PM

The Dell uses 802.11n on the 2.4 GHz band. n supports theoretical speeds up to 400  Mbps, if I recall correctly. This is the reason I thought the Dell's 57.31 down may be unusual, especially considering the Kindle Fire performs better on the same band. Are there ways to improve a connection on the 2.4 GHz band? What are possible sources of interference? 

 

Maybe I'll leave devices primarily for browsing on the 2.4 GHz band and move devices for media to the 5 GHz band. I'm not sure, though. The father often complained about dropped connections when we had only the 2.4 GHz band to work with. 


Edited by Dark Magician Girl, 02 April 2017 - 03:06 PM.


#7 Dark Magician Girl

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 03:14 PM

 

The modem is an Arris SURFboard (16 download and 4 upload streams) and the router is a Netgear AC1750 (R6400). 

 

The Dell All-In-One supports 802.11ac. 

 

All speeds were tested one room away from the router. 

The Dell will run ac on the 5ghz channel, b/g/n on the 2.4 ghz channel.

The final thing to check is what is you ISP providing you... if your ISP is providing 300 ghz,

then you Dell is right in spec.

 

 

Nice router,  am moving up to the (R6250) this tuesday,

 

 

I'm not sure what you mean by when you say to check what my ISP is providing me. 

 

I might return the R6400 model and get the R6700 model, which supports beamforming for both the 2.4 GHz and 5 Ghz bands. The problem is I cannot find this model in any store near me, although Amazon has it for the same price that the R6400 model cost me at Walmart. The problem is the one from Amazon may not arrive by the time the other needs to be return to Walmart. Plus I am looking around at other routers, including the R7000P model. I have been wondering if MU-MIMO is a good future-proof technology that would be worth investing in. I wish the family would have kept the gateway provided by the ISP for now...



#8 harry12

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 03:59 PM

 

 

The modem is an Arris SURFboard (16 download and 4 upload streams) and the router is a Netgear AC1750 (R6400). 

 

The Dell All-In-One supports 802.11ac. 

 

All speeds were tested one room away from the router. 

The Dell will run ac on the 5ghz channel, b/g/n on the 2.4 ghz channel.

The final thing to check is what is you ISP providing you... if your ISP is providing 300 ghz,

then you Dell is right in spec.

 

 

Nice router,  am moving up to the (R6250) this tuesday,

 

 

I'm not sure what you mean by when you say to check what my ISP is providing me. 

 

I might return the R6400 model and get the R6700 model, which supports beamforming for both the 2.4 GHz and 5 Ghz bands. The problem is I cannot find this model in any store near me, although Amazon has it for the same price that the R6400 model cost me at Walmart. The problem is the one from Amazon may not arrive by the time the other needs to be return to Walmart. Plus I am looking around at other routers, including the R7000P model. I have been wondering if MU-MIMO is a good future-proof technology that would be worth investing in. I wish the family would have kept the gateway provided by the ISP for now...

 

Regarding ISP.  My ISP provides 4 seperate speed contracts,  I have the third level, Turbo which provides 50 mbps.  

With netgear the Genie for them in settings should provide you the opp to set the max speed for each frequency. 

I looked at the User Manual for the 6400 (on Netgear), it seemed to spend a bunch of space discussing IPV6,  some

where in that 130+ pages is probably the answer.

Can get the 6700 pretty cheap on Ebay, but deliver unless it is Sure and Fast could be a week or so.

All the items mentioned above on Amazon are Prime, that's 2 day delivery including Sunday. 



#9 smax013

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 08:44 PM

The Dell uses 802.11n on the 2.4 GHz band. n supports theoretical speeds up to 400  Mbps, if I recall correctly. This is the reason I thought the Dell's 57.31 down may be unusual, especially considering the Kindle Fire performs better on the same band. Are there ways to improve a connection on the 2.4 GHz band? What are possible sources of interference? 
 
Maybe I'll leave devices primarily for browsing on the 2.4 GHz band and move devices for media to the 5 GHz band. I'm not sure, though. The father often complained about dropped connections when we had only the 2.4 GHz band to work with.


Speeds of 802.11n on the 2.4 GHz will depend on if the router and the device connecting to it can use one or two channels and whether both the router and the device connecting to it can use one or more antennas. If the connection is only using one 20 MHz channel (typical...see more in a moment) and one antenna, then the maximum theoretical throughput is 72 Mbps. And since it is pretty impossible to achieve the maximum theoretical throughput on any network protocol due to a number of factors, a throughput of 57.31 Mbps on a 2.4 GHz 802.11n connection seems to be potentially consistent with a connection with just one 20 MHz channel and one antenna. In my experience, you can pretty much assume about an 20% loss of throughput from theoretical maximum assuming you have a great network connection (i.e. in the case of WiFi, relatively close with strong signal).

The way that 802.11n "speeds" up connections from that 72 Mbps level is to either 1) use a combined channel (i.e. combining two 20 MHz channels into one 40 MHz mode/"superchannel") or 2) using more than one antenna. For #1, this can be complicated as there are limited channels/segments in the 2.4 GHz range and it is a rather crowded frequency range (i.e. WiFi, Bluetooth, microwaves, potentially cordless phones, etc). As a result, it is very common for interference to prevent the ability to combine two 20 MHz channels into a 40 MHZ "superchannel" (so to speak). This means that you are more likely to be able to achieve more throughput with multiple antennas (aka SU-MIMO). But again, as I mentioned in my post in the your other thread, MIMO must be present on both the router and the device connecting to the router to be effective. And I believe in the case of 802.11n, not all MIMOs are implemented the same since the 802.11n standard has some wiggle room in the standard for how MIMO is implemented (at least that is my understanding), so even if both the router and the device support MIMO, there might be differences in how that MIMO is implemented which might mean that those two implementations of MIMO might not play nice with each other.

#10 smax013

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 08:49 PM

All the items mentioned above on Amazon are Prime, that's 2 day delivery including Sunday.


This assumes the original poster has Amazon Prime. Not everyone does. If not, then the "free" shipping option would be more like a week. Or one would have to pay for one day or two day shipping.

#11 Dark Magician Girl

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Posted 07 April 2017 - 10:40 PM

We ended up keeping the R6400. I will experiment with the router's settings, but I want to get a new WiFi adapter first. My current one is limited to 802.11g. 



#12 smax013

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 07:34 PM

We ended up keeping the R6400.


Sounds like a reasonable plan. In my experience, router seem to last about 2 to 5 years, depending on a number of factors. So, it is entirely possible by the time you are in the market for a new router, then your devices might be in a better position to support things like MU-MIMO.




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