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The demise of 32 bit Linux is on, Arch Linux officially drops support


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#1 cat1092

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 05:42 AM

It's officially the beginning of the end of the 32 bit Linux era as we know it, Arch Linux was the first mainstream distro to make the move, and more will now surely follow suit. Looks like it was a matter of the others (to include Ubuntu) waiting on the sidelines to see who would be the first. :)

 

http://www.pcworld.com/article/3164876/linux/arch-linux-pulls-the-plug-on-32-bit.html

 

This was simply an economics move, it's costly to keep up with machines that have long been last ran, many packed away in closets, many others thrown into the large recycle bin outdoors (hopefully with HDD removed & physically destroyed), and a small minority still riding out what Ubuntu 16.04 gave in two more years of breathing room, otherwise would had bit the dust in 2019. 

 

And to be honest, it's about time, Linux cannot move forward while remaining 'backwards compatible' for years on end, thankfully Arch set the stage for the beginning of what's to come, meaning that the short term versions of Ubuntu (& distros based from it) aren't obligated to support 64 bit any longer. While the 32 bit platform has been a good one for many, just as 16 bit, and further backwards in time, 8 bit became disposable, now it's time for 32 bit users to move forward. :)

 

Not to worry, it won't be expensive, I've seen many 64 bit computers that's powerful on eBay (former corporate computers with features that consumer ones lacks) starting at $75 through $150 for a decent 64 bit PC with a Core 2 Duo, and sometimes (like my Optiplex 780) a Core 2 Quad. Note that many of the Core 2 Duo/Quad series at the end of the run were running DDR3 RAM, which my Optiplex 780, complete with a C2Q 9650 (that I grabbed for $114) does. So there's lots of hope on the horizon for those who cannot afford brand new 64 bit computers, many ships with a warranty, and replacements parts are plentiful. So if one can save only $10-15/month, in a year that's enough to purchase a good refurbished PC from a reputable seller (the latter is a must)  There's hundreds of millions of these computers (both notebooks & desktops) stored in warehouses, although I don't recommend to purchase a refurbished notebook. 

 

Because the three times I did, all resulted in a refund by SquareTrade, who handles eBay's warranties on computers at a reasonable price, a $350 model, a $100 one & finally a $400 model, since these cost more to repair than were worth, was refunded within 5 business days each. Haven't had any issues with desktops, because these aren't slung around all over the place, purchasing these are the same as an off lease corporate vehicle, the driver often could care less. 

 

So my main recommendation if refurbished are PC's, these costs less & are easier to maintain, and best of all are 64 bit computers with late Vista Business or Windows 7 Pro (the latter preferred) installed. 

 

In closing, it's simply time to let go of the 32 bit computers while there's a large selection of 64 bit one to choose from, before 32 bit lets you go & there's fewer & higher priced options. Today's market is a buyer's one, there's no reason for anyone to be running a 32 bit PC. Just one soda or cup of coffee per day for a year will more than pay for a 64 bit computer. :)

 

One thing that cannot be taken away are memories, yes there was a time when one could pull a working computer out of a dumpster & throw most any version of LInux on it, however those days are long gone. Please move to higher ground before you're required to. Even Mozilla Firefox 53 will stop working on some 32 bit computers & it will be very soon. 

 

http://hitechgazette.com/2017/03/11/firefox-53-will-not-work-on-pentium-4-amd-opteron-on-linux-and-32-bit-mac/

 

Looks like having a 32 bit computer today is as holding a hot coal, time to let go & move on! :)

 

Cat

 


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#2 Al1000

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 06:38 AM

Here's a topic that was posted in January.

Arch drops 32bit support :(

#3 DeimosChaos

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 09:39 AM

I'm honestly not really all that sad about this. I personally haven't used a 32bit system in a long time. While I know other people do have them, you have to think that those systems will start to die off pretty quickly. I have a feeling that there will be some niche Linux distros that will keep 32bit around a little while longer for those that need it. I wouldn't doubt that a lot of the main distros will follow suite and drop 32bit support sooner rather than later.


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#4 Al1000

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 09:50 AM

Of course the real "big" one will be when Debian drops support for 32-bit, then *buntu and Mint etc will do the same as a matter of course.

#5 paul88ks

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 02:03 PM

Time keeps on slipping into the future. 32 bit seems to be going the way of CRT monitors.Remember those?



#6 cat1092

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 02:10 PM

Here's a topic that was posted in January.

Arch drops 32bit support :(

 

Al, I was looking for a similar Topic in the Search bar before creating this one, there was no intent of a double one for the same issue on my part. :)

 

At any rate, this is an issue that cannot be overlooked, those on 32 bit computers needs to be preparing for the future now, or be forced into it later. As far as the 'making the leap', that's the easy part, 64 bit OS's runs just as 32 bit ones, only faster. To compare it would be like riding down a two lane road, one on each side (32 bit), to a multi lane Interstate or freeway with at least 3 lanes on each side (64 bit). :thumbsup:

 

THis was a huge Topic that generated a lot of discussion back in 2009, as users were hopping onto Windows 7, thousands of users are asking 'should I go with 32 or 64 bit?' & vice versa. Here, there'll be few choices, maybe some Puppy OS's, as long as the maintainers are willing to keep these up for a small minority of users.

 

Plus one still has Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, with support guaranteed until 2021, that's lots of time to prepare to move forward, 4 years away. :)

 

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#7 JohnC_21

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 02:55 PM

Plus one still has Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, with support guaranteed until 2021, that's lots of time to prepare to move forward, 4 years away.

 

This is me. Running XP + 16.04 on an old emachines with an Athlon XP 3000. 



#8 NickAu

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 04:29 PM

At least with Linux when they drop support for a distro all you do is download a new free version, unlike Windows that costs money.



#9 Gary R

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 12:24 AM

Time moves on, and at some point or other, it's no longer a viable proposition for developers to support old systems.

 

I'm afraid that those who still have 32 bit architecture, will at some point in the future, just have to accept that their time is past, and just like the 16 bit, and 8 bit systems before them, they are consigned to history.



#10 cat1092

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 04:06 AM

Time moves on, and at some point or other, it's no longer a viable proposition for developers to support old systems.

 

I'm afraid that those who still have 32 bit architecture, will at some point in the future, just have to accept that their time is past, and just like the 16 bit, and 8 bit systems before them, they are consigned to history.

 

+1! :thumbup2:

 

Technology is just like time, doesn't stand still for a second. :)

 

The only 'transition' to 64 bit is obtaining a 64 bit computer, otherwise little difference as far as Linux is concerned. Note that with Windows, even on a 64 bit computer, one must select a 64 bit download of Chrome or Firefox, with Linux, the software will match the bit version of the installed OS. Beginning with Ubuntu 12.04/Linux Mint 13 LTS in 2012, it was finally recommended if one has a 64 bit computer, to install that version, as driver support has been greatly increased & continues to move forward to this day.

 

That was a 5 year ago notice of what's now coming to fruition. :) 

 

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#11 cat1092

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 04:34 AM

Time keeps on slipping into the future. 32 bit seems to be going the way of CRT monitors.Remember those?

 

Yes, some weighed close to 50 pounds & bulky as crap. :lol:

 

I once did some charity work for someone a few years back, and the lady offered my one of those, complete with Dell speakers, although I did so in a dignified way, told her that the best thing she could do with the monitor (if she had no other use for it), to set to the roadside, someone would pick it up. About 3 hours later, the lady called & told me that I was right, some folks loaded it into the back of a pickup & drove away.

 

On my advice, she kept the speakers, as long as these works, are always useful, the type that plugs into the green jack of many computers. I had so many of these that another set wasn't needed, in fact, gave a dozen or more sets away & still have a half dozen stashed. :)

 

Hopefully she's off of XP Media Center by now, I should had performed a follow up visit in 2014, yet I has so many of these folks that I assisted for free over the years, there's no way in my condition that I could keep up with every person that received assistance. While I still assist a few needy locals, my work in that area has been cut back a lot & have moved forward with what I learned while working under the supervision of retired IT Pros. :)

 

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#12 NickAu

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 06:17 AM

In a few years we will be having this conversation about 64 bit.



#13 MadmanRB

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 11:23 AM

In a few years we will be having this conversation about 64 bit.

I dont know about that.

128bit seems a long way off as we have not even scratched the surface of 64bit in terms of its limitations.

The thing is that we really have not seen such big leaps in tech recently as even the latest Ryzen and Kaby Lake have only made small improvements compared to the leap seen by previous generations.

I mean Ryzen for sure is a improvement but its not world shattering.

In truth we kind of slowed down on innovation of CPU's and architectures.

Even mobile has kind of had minor innovastions


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#14 DeimosChaos

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 12:21 PM

In truth we kind of slowed down on innovation of CPU's and architectures.

 

The reason for that is we have pretty much maxed out the current silicon that CPUs use. They have pretty much crammed as many semiconductors onto a chip as they can get.

 

https://phys.org/news/2015-08-silicon-limits-power-electronics-revolution.html


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#15 paul88ks

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 01:32 PM

 

In truth we kind of slowed down on innovation of CPU's and architectures.

 

The reason for that is we have pretty much maxed out the current silicon that CPUs use. They have pretty much crammed as many semiconductors onto a chip as they can get.

 

https://phys.org/news/2015-08-silicon-limits-power-electronics-revolution.html

 

Fascinating Article!






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