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Wifi driver error when laptop is closed


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#1 mbiggs31183

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 09:49 AM

So I have a MSI GT72VR GRE Dominator Pro laptop running Windows 10. A lot of time when I close my laptop and reopen it a while later my wifi will have disappeared completely. When I go into Device Manager the driver responsible for handling it, listed under USB section, tells me there's an error and even if I disable and enable, or uninstall and reinstall it won't work until I do a hard shut down. Not a restart, an actual full shutdown. Any ideas how I can keep this from happening?



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 10:05 AM

For clarity's sake:

 

1. Do you have Fast Startup enabled?  (Control Panel -> Choose what the power button does -> options and checkboxes at bottom of dialog)

 

2. By "hard shut down" do you mean a "Hold in the power button for X seconds until the machine instantly powers off?"

 

3. By uninstall/reinstall are you referring to the device driver or are you uninstalling the device itself and going through the whole automatic recognition of hardware and reinstallation of driver?


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#3 mbiggs31183

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 10:16 AM

For clarity's sake:

 

1. Do you have Fast Startup enabled?  (Control Panel -> Choose what the power button does -> options and checkboxes at bottom of dialog)

 

2. By "hard shut down" do you mean a "Hold in the power button for X seconds until the machine instantly powers off?"

 

3. By uninstall/reinstall are you referring to the device driver or are you uninstalling the device itself and going through the whole automatic recognition of hardware and reinstallation of driver?

 

Ok so it looks like Fast Startup is enabled. 

 

By hard shutdown I just mean that I have to click Start, Shutdown. If I choose restart, the problem persists. 

 

Yes, by uninstall/reinstall I mean I uninstall the driver, tell it to find new hardware, and it reinstalls itself, albeit with the same error. 



#4 opera

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 10:34 AM

Have you tried going into the properties of your network card in Device manager and unticking ''allow computer to turn this device off to save power''?



#5 dc3

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 10:37 AM

If you are uninstalling the driver from the Device Manager you need to shut down the computer and then restart it.  When the computer is restarted it will install a new driver.


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#6 mbiggs31183

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 10:44 AM

Have you tried going into the properties of your network card in Device manager and unticking ''allow computer to turn this device off to save power''?

I'm not seeing an option for that.

 

Also, the error that I'm getting is "Device Descriptor Request Failed" and it will just say Unknown USB Device as its description. It also affects my bluetooth in addition to my wifi. 

Device status reads:

"Windows has stopped this device because it has reported problems. (Code 43)
 
A request for the USB device descriptor failed."


#7 britechguy

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 10:51 AM

 

For clarity's sake:

 

1. Do you have Fast Startup enabled?  (Control Panel -> Choose what the power button does -> options and checkboxes at bottom of dialog)

 

2. By "hard shut down" do you mean a "Hold in the power button for X seconds until the machine instantly powers off?"

 

3. By uninstall/reinstall are you referring to the device driver or are you uninstalling the device itself and going through the whole automatic recognition of hardware and reinstallation of driver?

 

Ok so it looks like Fast Startup is enabled. 

 

By hard shutdown I just mean that I have to click Start, Shutdown. If I choose restart, the problem persists. 

 

Yes, by uninstall/reinstall I mean I uninstall the driver, tell it to find new hardware, and it reinstalls itself, albeit with the same error. 

 

 

Not that I'm denying your experience, but given the conditions you describe it's making less and less sense to me.

 

When "Fast Restart" is enabled, choosing Shutdown from the power menu does not, in fact, shut the computer down in the conventional sense.  Fast startup is also known as hybrid boot or partial hibernation where, when you shut down, the state of the operating system is written out to a hibernation file for reloading when the system is powered up again (and the difference between this, and full hibernation, is that the user state is not also written out for reloading).  When you do this the OS should return to "where it was" when powered up again.   Restart, by contrast, forces the Windows 10 operating system to completely unload and then reload itself from disc from scratch when booting again.

 

I can't understand, at all, why a shutdown would do anything.

 

All of the above being said, I have seen some pretty bizarre issues occur once the hibernation file used for Fast Startup becomes corrupted, and it never "self heals."  I turn off Fast Startup as a matter of course because I'd rather have a slow boot from scratch than an OS return from hibernation when I do a shutdown.   As far as I'm concerned, the way Microsoft arranged how the OS behaves when using Shutdown versus Restart, is entirely backward.

 

I also had the thought about power management for the card (or, now cards) as well as "wake from LAN".


Edited by britechguy, 25 March 2017 - 10:54 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#8 opera

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 10:51 AM

It should be under the Power Management tab there.



#9 mjd420nova

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 10:58 AM

I've been seeing more and more of thee kinds of faults, especially with WINX.  I recommend you disable the hibernate option as it seems to be the root of most faults.  Too many things, hardware included get put in different modes upon hibernate and have difficulty coming back ready when restoring.  I don't recommend the idle option either for the same reasons.



#10 mbiggs31183

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 10:58 AM

It should be under the Power Management tab there.

In Device Manager? I'm not seeing a tab like that. If I click on Properties for the driver, there's no power tab, nor is there one in the main Device Manager window. This is on Windows 10?

 

 

 

 

 

For clarity's sake:

 

1. Do you have Fast Startup enabled?  (Control Panel -> Choose what the power button does -> options and checkboxes at bottom of dialog)

 

2. By "hard shut down" do you mean a "Hold in the power button for X seconds until the machine instantly powers off?"

 

3. By uninstall/reinstall are you referring to the device driver or are you uninstalling the device itself and going through the whole automatic recognition of hardware and reinstallation of driver?

 

Ok so it looks like Fast Startup is enabled. 

 

By hard shutdown I just mean that I have to click Start, Shutdown. If I choose restart, the problem persists. 

 

Yes, by uninstall/reinstall I mean I uninstall the driver, tell it to find new hardware, and it reinstalls itself, albeit with the same error. 

 

 

Not that I'm denying your experience, but given the conditions you describe it's making less and less sense to me.

 

When "Fast Restart" is enabled, choosing Shutdown from the power menu does not, in fact, shut the computer down in the conventional sense.  Fast startup is also known as hybrid boot or partial hibernation where, when you shut down, the state of the operating system is written out to a hibernation file for reloading when the system is powered up again (and the difference between this, and full hibernation, is that the user state is not also written out for reloading).  When you do this the OS should return to "where it was" when powered up again.   Restart, by contrast, forces the Windows 10 operating system to completely unload and then reload itself from disc from scratch when booting again.

 

I can't understand, at all, why a shutdown would do anything.

 

I also had the thought about power management for the card (or, now cards) as well as "wake from LAN".

 

 

I agree that it makes no sense. I didn't feel like Fast Startup would have any effect on this issue but I turned it off just in case. The most I can figure is that some setting somewhere is causing the device to go screwy when I'm closing my laptop. For clarity, I'm not shutting down the laptop or putting into hibernation, its just going to sleep when I close it. As far as shutdown vs restart is maybe its because in a shut down its killing power to the device? I'm just guessing though. 



#11 mbiggs31183

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 11:01 AM

I've been seeing more and more of thee kinds of faults, especially with WINX.  I recommend you disable the hibernate option as it seems to be the root of most faults.  Too many things, hardware included get put in different modes upon hibernate and have difficulty coming back ready when restoring.  I don't recommend the idle option either for the same reasons.

Its not hibernating when the lid is closed, it just goes into sleep mode. I double checked power settings to make sure of that. 

 

EDIT: I just found a setting that tells the laptop to go from sleep mode to hibernate after 15 minutes so I've disabled that option. 


Edited by mbiggs31183, 25 March 2017 - 11:03 AM.


#12 britechguy

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 11:33 AM

And, yes, Power Management is one of the tabs on device properties in Device Manager.

 

I tried to post a screen shot but long ago ran out of the space that BC allots a single user for posting images and the gyrations necessary to upload them to a third party hosting site and include them by URL here is just not worth it in my opinion.  It also has the long-term consequence of images "breaking" in posts as people remove them from third party hosts, which makes many messages entirely cryptic through useless.


Edited by britechguy, 25 March 2017 - 11:35 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#13 mbiggs31183

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 03:55 PM

So it just happened again. I closed my laptop and ran some errands and when I came back my wifi was gone. I took a screen shot of the Device Manager:

Untitled.png

 

So even after all the change I've made, I'm still getting this problem. The funny thing is that the only thing that DID change was this time when I shut down and restarted the problem DID NOT fix itself. I had to shut down and restart a second time to get it to come back on. 

 

And, yes, Power Management is one of the tabs on device properties in Device Manager.

 

I tried to post a screen shot but long ago ran out of the space that BC allots a single user for posting images and the gyrations necessary to upload them to a third party hosting site and include them by URL here is just not worth it in my opinion.  It also has the long-term consequence of images "breaking" in posts as people remove them from third party hosts, which makes many messages entirely cryptic through useless.

 

I'm not sure why I don't have this tab but its not there. I have General, Driver, Details, Events, and Resources. Also, when the wifi fails its actually TWO USB devices that disappear from my device manager. One is ASMedia USB Root Hub, and the other is ASMedia USB 3.1 eXtensible Host Controller. 

 

I found Power Management on the ASMedia USB Root Hub, but not on the Host Controller. I've disabled the setting on the Root Hub, so hopefully that will work. 


Edited by mbiggs31183, 25 March 2017 - 03:58 PM.


#14 britechguy

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 04:27 PM

You need to be looking at what's under the Network Adapter entry, as that's what those of us talking about power management are referring to.

 

Based on what you've reported now I'd strongly suggest that you do follow the instructions below and report back on what each utility has to say after you run it:

 

--------------------------------------------------

Fixing “Weird Issues” under Windows 8 or Windows 10 Using the System File Checker (SFC) and Deployment Imaging Servicing and Management (DISM)

If you are having "weird problems" with any Windows system, the first thing you should do is to run the System File Checker (SFC).  Open a Command Prompt window using the "Run as Administrator" option.  The easiest way to do this is to hit the Windows Key, immediately enter the text “Command Prompt” and getting the Command Prompt desktop app returned as the first item.  Gain focus on it and bring up the context menu either via right click or hitting the menu/applications key [if your machine has one] or Shift+F10 if it does not then selecting “Run as administrator” from the context menu that appears.  Once that elevated command prompt window is opened, enter:

SFC /scannow

When it's finished look at its output to see if it found any corrupt files and whether it was able to fix them.

If SFC reports that it was unable to fix something, on Windows 8 and Windows 10 systems it's also worth running the following command, also in a Command Prompt window that's been opened with "Run as Adminstrator":

DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth

DISM should be able to fix errors that SFC may not be able to fix.  If you wish to be really thorough, after running DISM, and presuming it reports that all has been fixed, shutdown and restart your machine and run SFC one final time.  The SFC result should be clean.

------------------------------------------------

 

I am suspecting that if the above doesn't fix it then a reset installation of Windows 10 may be indicated.  Others will almost surely chime in with their opinion on what should come next if SFC & DISM don't fix the underlying problems.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 





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