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Best DNS Provider


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10 replies to this topic

#1 sander66

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 09:38 AM

Hi,

 

I wasn't sure where to place this question.

 

What is currently viewed as the best DNS provider in terms of safety, privacy, and performance (probably in that order)?

Comodo, Norton, Open?

 



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#2 buddy215

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 11:41 AM

OpenDNS is what I switched to years ago after some errors with my ISP's default DNS provider. I have zero complaints or problems with OpenDNS.

Surprised you didn't mention Google as a provider. Home Internet Security | OpenDNS


“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#3 sander66

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 11:50 AM

I excluded Google as I do not trust them more than my ISP in collecting my information.

 

Of course, there is the nagging question why are there free DNS providers?



#4 buddy215

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 01:21 PM

You may or may not know about what the Repugnant US senators have done.

 

Senate votes to let ISPs sell your Web browsing history to advertisers | Ars Technica

QUOTE A BIT:......(ALL Repugnants voted for...ALL Dems voted against)

The US Senate today voted to eliminate broadband privacy rules that would have required ISPs to get consumers' explicit consent before selling or sharing Web browsing data and other private information with advertisers and other companies.

The rules were approved in October 2016 by the Federal Communications Commission's then-Democratic leadership, but are opposed by the FCC's new Republican majority and Republicans in Congress. The Senate today used its power under the Congressional Review Act to ensure that the FCC rulemaking "shall have no force or effect" and to prevent the FCC from issuing similar regulations in the future.

The House, also controlled by Republicans, would need to vote on the measure before the privacy rules are officially eliminated. President Trump could also preserve the privacy rules by issuing a veto. If the House and Trump agree with the Senate's action, ISPs won't have to seek customer approval before sharing their browsing histories and other private information with advertisers..............


“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#5 sander66

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 01:29 PM

So, using an independent DNS and https would help?



#6 Kilroy

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Posted 27 March 2017 - 10:54 AM

You can run GRC's DNS Benchmark to find the fastest DNS server.  As far as Security and Privacy, those are personal issues, what one person believes to be secure and private may not work for another person.  Unless you're paying for the DNS service, your information is the fee.



#7 sander66

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Posted 27 March 2017 - 06:22 PM

  Unless you're paying for the DNS service, your information is the fee.

 

That is my logic as well. What is the motivation of the free DNS servers to provide that service?

On the other side I want loose anything moving away from Comcast's DNS in terms of privacy.



#8 Kilroy

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 10:42 AM

DNS (Domain Name Server) converts web names, i.e. BleepingComputer.com to their IP address 104.20.59.209.  It is much easier to remember web sites by name, rather than by number.

 

So, the privacy issue you have is that your DNS provider knows what web sites you are requesting.  Even if you went to a site by its IP address as soon as you start navigating on the site it will make a DNS query as the links are to web names and not IP addresses.  In the end you have to trust someone, the question is who?



#9 sander66

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 07:25 PM

That whh

 

DNS (Domain Name Server) converts web names, i.e. BleepingComputer.com to their IP address 104.20.59.209.  It is much easier to remember web sites by name, rather than by number.

 

So, the privacy issue you have is that your DNS provider knows what web sites you are requesting.  Even if you went to a site by its IP address as soon as you start navigating on the site it will make a DNS query as the links are to web names and not IP addresses.  In the end you have to trust someone, the question is who?

 

The who question is my question...



#10 Kilroy

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 11:45 AM

I'd probably go Open DNS, Google, Comcast.  To tell you the truth, I don't know off the top of my head who I'm using these days.  If you were to follow my web activity it would only tell you I'm someone with many interests.  A lot of my searches are to gather information for other people.  So, even where I go on New Egg and Amazon are really indications of my actual interests.  I'm a fan of give them all the information they will take and let them try to figure out what is real.



#11 toofarnorth

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 11:51 AM

Open DNS is good. Cisco bought them and will hopefully keep the home packages aviable!

Pay for the Home VIP package and you will get stats and the possibility to whitelist things.

That should keep you safe and sound without risking too much information leaking about your habits.

 

tfn

 






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