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Best way to manage updates?


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#1 cmptrgy

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 11:27 PM

I haven't done any new updates yet on my system since the original updates. From what I've read I should allow Levels 1 & 2, select level 3's needed for how I use my system: and for me not to do level 3's & 4's unless I know what I'm doing.

Is there way to store updates I don't do but want to be able to go back and do install and up date from the stored location if applicable in the future?



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#2 anorkneemerse

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 12:11 AM

Fyi, Linux Mint users can ignore certain software/program updates(>Edit >Preference) and not check for certain software updates(>Edit >Software sources > Additional Repo) thru the Update Manager setting.

 

@ cmptrgy ....... Ditto for me, ie only install Level 1 & 2 updates.



#3 cmptrgy

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 10:49 AM

thanks, I'll look into what you mention.



#4 MadmanRB

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 12:04 PM

Keep to levels 1 through 4 if you are still new.

Level 5's are where things really get hairy as those are normally kernel updates which can matter on certain systems.

Normally level 5 is fine to do however kernel updates can make hardware not work.

Always check for regressions in kernels such as nvidia driver support (though this has improved greatly in the last few years) and compatibility.


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#5 pcpunk

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 08:24 PM

I collect the Default and rarely have an issue.


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#6 cat1092

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 03:54 AM

Kernel Updates (Level 5) & generally safe & recommended for security. :)

 

These can be checked by opening the Update Manager, just click it, under View, there's the option to see Linux Kernels installed (you'll get a warning prior to viewing, it's OK to look). You'll see then the ones recommended for stability & security. However, there's always the chance, especially on older computers, that a new kernel may cause a component not to work, especially those that are few in numbers these days (computers that 10+ years old). Those with older & no longer produced Broadcom wireless cards are one example. Some of which are a challenge to get to working on the current kernels. :)

 

The good thing is that one can revert back to the older kernel by booting into a prior one (a good reason why to have the present one written on paper), at boot, there's a Recovery Mode, where one can boot into that last kernel. The the new can be removed from the same interface as above. Simply select to remove that kernel & reboot, one be back at the previous stage & be sure when that kernel is offered again, hide it, by right clicking, it'll be shown to ignore updates for this package. So far, I've been lucky, even the 4.8 kernels has ran successfully on one computer, this was done by accident, although I reverted back to the latest recommended kernel for support, stability & security. :)

 

Eventually we'll be on the 4.8 kernels, for today, will upgrade to those that are offered. 

 

As far as any other Level 4/5 (& some 3) updates, if these aren't used by your system, there's no need to install these. That's why the Linux Mint developers placed beginning with Mint 18, the three options at time of install. As long as newbies goes with the default offering, normally there's no issues, Mint has a conservative update policy compared to Ubuntu for good reason, so as not to break the OS, which can drive those new to the OS away. Still, Linux Mint is quite secure going with the defaults, and only offers Level 4 & 5 updates when needed (example, kernel & LInux updates). Some of the Level 4 ones may apply to audio, video & other issues, there's a changelog for every update that can be viewed, that shows the urgency of the update. If medium or higher, and the update applies to one's system, then it should be OK to update any of these. If Low, can be skipped until it becomes a Medium rated one. 

 

Hope that I'm not throwing too much at you, yet in general, is how it works pertaining to Linux Mint. While I once used the Terminal to update, I no longer do, because we don't have the option to pick & choose, it's all or none. BTW, if you have a desktop PC & a NVIDIA GPU, there's a PPA to install the proprietary drivers, similar to the ones that installs on Windows & only a version or two behind, please let us know if this applies to you & we can assist. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 cmptrgy

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 08:41 PM

Thanks Cat that was a very good explanation



#8 The-Toolman

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 12:17 AM

I've always found this to have valuable information for tweaking most Linux distros I've used.

 

https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/

 

Make sure you read and understand the tweaks thoroughly before applying any tweaks you may choose to do.


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#9 cat1092

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 02:33 AM

I collect the Default and rarely have an issue.

 

Same here, rarely (about twice yearly)  I'll change Update Policy to the bottom option (Show All) just to see if any applies to me, most will be Level 4 updates that normally I either don't need, or doesn't apply to my system. Then will switch back to default. 

 

Normally when a Level 5 Update is offered on Linux Mint, it's the Linux configuration itself, or a kernel update, both of which normally shows 'medium' urgency in the changelog. :)

 

Those who risks to choose the Update Policy to the most aggressive has the most risk of breaking their install, probably due to the number of unneeded Level 4 drivers that's installed (same with updating via Terminal). I see it like this, why would I be installing a bunch of ATI/AMD (or older Intel graphics drivers) on a newer system that has a NVIDIA card? Only an ignorant (or rookie) Windows user would do this, and their update policy pertaining to hardware isn't perfect either. although it's been quite some time since I've had Windows Update offer those for a different brand of graphics card. Unless the prior ones were improperly removed, there's a continually updated tool for cleanup when switching from AMD to NVIDIA or vice versa, or one chooses to run onboard graphics & no 3rd party GPU (few does this). 

 

So for the most part, with Linux Mint, the majority of Level 4 updates are for drivers, and there's an above 50% chance on a modern computer that most, if not all, applies to no one. We get most of our needed hardware drivers either in the Linux ISO, as part of the initial update process or via the Driver Manager tab in the Administration menu, there will usually be one for either AMD or Intel CPU microcode drivers there. In the case of NVIDIA GPU drivers drivers, one should add the PPA for these as follows. Terminal lines in quote(s), note that both are to be separately ran (why I quoted separate). :)

 

 

 

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:graphics-drivers/ppa

 

 

 

sudo apt-get update

 

Source: ('D' & 'E') on following page.

 

https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/12

 

Now go back to Administration > Driver Manager & then the correct NVIDIA driver will be shown (usually will be recommended choice). Look for that, on Linux Mint 'recommended' is in green print, although may often be 2-3 versions behind the Windows equivalent. This is because first, NVIDIA has to ship the driver, than the PPA team will decide if it's stable or 'bleeding edge', as well as having to take the time to recompile the driver. So that's why if dual booting or on a separate computer, one may have (as of date of this posting) version 381.65 on Windows & 375.39 on Linux, what's showing on my system now & just checked for updates. So that's probably like 4-5 versions behind, as not all of the minor drivers won't be included in the PPA. :)

 

Am going to double check to make sure I have the 'right' PPA, could have sworn that the last install had 378.xx installed. 

 

EDIT: I did have the wrong PPA added previously, added the one above & now 'nvidia-381' is offered, had I not been posting here, wouldn't had caught it until who knows when. :lol:

 

If by chance the latest driver (denoted by higher number) gives troubles, go to the prior one, have had to do that several times. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 19 April 2017 - 02:41 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 The-Toolman

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 08:35 AM

I will give the open source driver a try first and if it works without problems I will stay with it and only will install and use the proprietary graphics driver if having problems with the open source driver.


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#11 cat1092

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 03:45 AM

Normally that's the way to go, especially for onboard graphics, or discrete ones not so powerful, and of course, all AMD GPU's at least until the next-gen release. :)

 

However, with a powerful GPU that's $300 & up, one is generally seeking the best performance possible, otherwise would had saved $150-200 & went with a budget card. Here, it makes perfect sense to go with proprietary drivers. In fact, just clean installed the notebook my wife uses from Mint 17.3 to 18.1, and just by chance, the proprietary drivers were on the Driver Manager list, and the next to latest was the recommended option, although by default, the open source driver was installed & active. So I updated both the Intel microcode firmware & NVIDIA GPU driver in one sweep, then performed the mandatory reboot. Didn't have to add a PPA, a first for me with a discrete NVIDIA card. :)

 

Wow, the display looked better than ever, running one driver behind from what's on this PC with a GTX 1060 FTW + ACX 3.0 (6GB). 

 

Spoiler
 
Note that on some of my computers, have no choice except to use the open source driver. If one catches it fast enough after release, can also install proprietary Intel drivers (developed with assistance from the open source community) for CPU's with an inbuilt GPU chip, found the page with the downloads, took a few tries of different drivers, then hit the one that was right for the onboard graphics on my CPU. Although the only times I use onboard is for initial install, then will install the PPA for the GPU & then the drivers, power all down & remove all sources of power, ground myself & then install the card, connect the proper cable (HDMI or Displayport), then fire up the machine, if all goes well, then everything will be right, the first time. :thumbsup:
 
Source for Intel proprietary drivers for Linux (latest), some may have to navigate the site for older ones, 2nd link:
 
 
 
Don't know why, it seems that the more powerful the card, the more work needed to be done, sometimes even the Live install media won't display (an 'Out of Range' block going from one corner to the next) when the card is installed. That's why it's best to install the OS with onboard graphics, followed by the drivers for the new, then the card, to get it right. I know now if installing a dual boot system with a new card, not to bother with the new before having both OS's installed. This saves a lot of time & work, as well as wear & tear on the card & PCIe slot for the GPU, in tight spots, one may be bumped up a bit, which should be avoided. :)
 
That was the very reason why I didn't bother with installing Linux Mint on my best PC with a GTX 1070 FTW ACX + 3.0, too much work in getting the drivers installed, and believe the card was looking for at least a 2K (1440p) monitor, as I was still dealing with the 'Out of Range' error after just a couple of days post install. 
 
However, for the majority, the install should go well, even if having to select a proprietary driver from the Driver Manager (or PPA) for best performance/quality of video becomes needed, these are treated just as any other update as newer ones becomes available, depending on system. :)
 
EDIT: Added links for proprietary Intel GPU drivers
 
Cat

Edited by cat1092, 25 April 2017 - 03:53 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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