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Concerned with CPU voltage


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#1 mark_316

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 07:00 PM

Hello, I don't know much of anything about voltages, but recently my PC has been restarting itself randomly while gaming and before I send in my PSU for a RMA I have been looking at some things regarding the power. I tried doing some research at the base voltages for the i7 4790k but couldn't really find much. I haven't overclocked my CPU and the voltage seems to be 1.271 (this is while idle on the desktop, but im not sure if voltages fluctuate based on usage.) According to HWMonitor and CPU-Z it appears to flicker between 1.182 and 1.271 is that an issue? Also if this is a high voltage, how do i go about lowering it? I think its probably in the bios, so my motherboard brand is gigabyte. Also, if my processors voltage is too high, could that even cause the restarts while gaming?

 

Here is a picture of CPU-Z http://imgur.com/dman6Vb


Edited by mark_316, 23 March 2017 - 07:06 PM.


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#2 mjd420nova

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 08:39 PM

I don't think the  monitor program is that accurate.  The .09 deviation isn't a worry.  Yes, loading may have some affect on the voltage, but it shouldn't.  The power supply is  suspect here.  An accurate meter should be used to measure those voltages.



#3 MDD1963

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 09:18 PM

The voltage in mormal operation fluctuates, as the mainboard varies the CPU speed and core voltage in near real-time depending on current boost speed, load, etc...


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#4 mark_316

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 09:41 PM

I don't think the  monitor program is that accurate.  The .09 deviation isn't a worry.  Yes, loading may have some affect on the voltage, but it shouldn't.  The power supply is  suspect here.  An accurate meter should be used to measure those voltages.

This should probably be a different thread, but its still somewhat on the same topic. However, speaking of the power supply, i have a fairly suspect psu, the evga supernova 650w g1, and I believe that could be the reason of the restarts i mentioned before. http://imgur.com/sU50hZC There is a link to the current voltage levels from HWMonitor. My PC worked fine for about 1.3 years with the current power supply, so maybe it could just be poorly aged due to its cheap build. One weird thing about the restarts is that it happens randomly, it can happen instantly when booting up a game, or it could take 3 hours into the gaming session to restart. Does that rule out a poor psu? It's still under warranty so I plan on sending it in for RMA soon.



#5 jonuk76

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 04:02 AM

The CPU is powered by the 12v rail on the PSU, and the conversion down to the low voltage/high current power needed by modern CPU's is done by the motherboards Voltage Regulator Module (VRM). Specifically it gets it's power from the 4 or 8 pin connector from the power supply.

 

For Intel CPU's the CPU core voltage is by default (unless overridden deliberately with a BIOS setting) determined by the processor VID - some logic contained in the CPU which tells the VRM what voltage it should be run at.

 

What you are describing doesn't sound unusual. The VID depends on the CPU's speed and state of load. Under high loads 1.271v sounds I think fairly typical for a Haswell CPU being overclocked.  IIRC my 4670k showed around that when I had it running at 4.2 ghz.  I'm currently running it without an overclock (3.6 Ghz) and the VID shows 1.136v when running a torture test. If you stop things running and allow the CPU to idle the VID should drop. Programs like HWMonitor allow you to directly read the CPU VID.  Something different but related is the processors VCORE which shows the actual voltage being fed to the processor, and this will also vary a lot depending on load etc.  This varies by more than the VID, and by default with all power saving features enabled, the voltage drops significantly when under low load. Again you can look at VCORE with HWMonitor and other monitoring programs.

 

As said, the VID voltage can be overridden by setting the processor VCORE voltage in BIOS (this will vary according to the motherboards capabilities) and you may also be able to set a VID offset (basically instead of setting a fixed voltage, it still uses the VID but increases or decrease the voltage by a specified amount).  Note that unless overclocking, you shouldn't need to touch these settings.  Setting voltages too high can cause high heat levels and damage. Setting voltages too low will cause instability and crashes.  I can't guarantee anything but from what I've read general opinion is that anything above 1.35v on Haswell CPU's is pushing it, but it depends on cooling.

 

Frankly, I would suggest removing the overclocks (your CPUz shows it set to 4.4 Ghz) and see if your problems persist. Did you overclock this yourself, or did you buy it pre-configured or something?


Edited by jonuk76, 24 March 2017 - 05:10 AM.

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#6 mark_316

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 12:17 PM

Frankly, I would suggest removing the overclocks (your CPUz shows it set to 4.4 Ghz) and see if your problems persist. Did you overclock this yourself, or did you buy it pre-configured or something?

I don't believe that I have touched the speeds of the CPU, but I share my PC with someone who also games, so they might have done it themselves. I believe that my motherboard doesn't even support overclocking, but i think that this CPU can boost up to 4.4. How would I go about moving the speeds down? I'm probably going to RMA my power supply in about half a week, so i'm willing to try anything in order to fix it before then.



#7 jonuk76

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 12:22 PM

You know I read it as i5-4690K (which has a turbo mode set at 3.9 Ghz).  My mistake! The i7-4790K does indeed boost to 4.4 Ghz.  What are your temperatures like?


Edited by jonuk76, 24 March 2017 - 12:23 PM.

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#8 mark_316

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 12:43 PM

Temperatures are fine, around 25-33 at idle and they never really go into the 60's while playing a game. I think that the PSU is the issue, mainly since I don't think it could be anything else now, and that it is a fairly low rated PSU. I remember seeing an article on it and they said it was a pretty questionable EVGA power supply. But then again with the message I get in event viewer it could be anything really. I get kernel-power, event 41, task 63 which says "The system has rebooted without cleanly shutting down first. This error could be caused if the system stopped responding, crashed, or lost power unexpectedly." 

 

Also some people recommend to to test ram when you get this error message, I ran the windows ram test and had no issues


Edited by mark_316, 24 March 2017 - 12:48 PM.


#9 jonuk76

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 01:05 PM

Well, it's quite possible the PSU is at issue (as you'd expect a surge in power draw as you start up a game) but I don't think the varying voltages you're seeing on the CPU core are evidence of it.  If I recall correctly, the EVGA G2 and G3 power supplies are much higher quality.  Dips on the 12v rail (or any of the PSU rails) may be more of an indication of a problem.  


7sbvuf-6.png


#10 mark_316

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 01:24 PM

 (as you'd expect a surge in power draw as you start up a game)

That's the thing though, the restarts are completely random and they don't always happen on the startup of a game, sometimes they can happen hours in, and sometimes they happen right at the start. One thing I believe I have noticed is that the longer my PC is on the more prone to a restart it is. An example is, I could be doing some homework on excel for a couple hours, then start up h1z1 and my PC will crash, when I can start up h1z1 right after boot and be fine. This could be a coincidence, and i'm not sure if its an indicator of a specific problem. Is it possible for a power supply to be losing power over time while powered on? Or could it be from a poor outlet?

 

Edit: But the crashes do seem to happen less on less demanding games like battlerite, path of exile and league of legends.


Edited by mark_316, 24 March 2017 - 01:40 PM.





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