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Is my grandma NSA's worst nightmare?


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#1 Just_One_Question

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 10:59 PM

Hi!

I was just thinking,
My 100-year old grandma, doesn't use the Internet, doesn't have a computer, doesn't have a phone, doesn't have a radio & doesn't have a TV. She also doesn't own a debit/credit card and has no 'specific' address on her ID card, just the name of the village she resides in.

If she were to be somehow incorporated in a terrorist organization, would there be in theory anything whatsoever that the NSA could be able to do in order to get more direct information about her? I mean, it's not like they would be able to hack into her pre-Soviet era(pre World War II) washing machine lol.

I know it's a pretty silly question, but it's true though, isn't it? She is virtually immune to governement surveillance, unless they spend $1 million dollars to fly drones over her remote village. :lmao:

Edited by Just_One_Question, 23 March 2017 - 06:24 PM.


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#2 saw101

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 06:35 PM

Perhaps your question would be better served here: https://www.nsa.gov/about/contact-us/


I never make the same mistake twice....I always make it 5 or 6 times just to be sure!


#3 Just_One_Question

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 06:49 PM

Perhaps your question would be better served here: https://www.nsa.gov/about/contact-us/

They probably wouldn't answer honestly. Plus, I don't want to get higher up on their lists..

I was just asking out of curiousity. What do you think?
:)

Edited by Just_One_Question, 23 March 2017 - 06:50 PM.


#4 opera

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 01:14 AM

They would trace her through you after reading this thread  :)



#5 Just_One_Question

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 07:30 AM

They would trace her through you after reading this thread  :)


So there is nothing that they'd be able to extract directly from her, electronically, after all, huh? :lmao:

Edited by Just_One_Question, 24 March 2017 - 07:30 AM.


#6 britechguy

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 10:37 AM

It doesn't matter whether it comes "directly from her."   I can guarantee you that there is plenty of material in cyberspace on all of us, even if it's just for the ID card you refer to.

 

Yes, she'd be a bit more of a challenge to gather electronic intelligence on, but far from impossible.  People do not realize just how much information, which has always been a part of the public record, is now available online because public records, being public, are being put online.

 

Just try doing a bit of "strategic Googling" on her name with the name of her village or some other trivial piece of information you know about her.  I think you'll be surprised at what turns up.

 

And if she were a "person of interest" and the electronic options were sparse you can bet that there would be "boots on the ground" doing surveillance.  It is well-nigh impossible to go off the grid anymore unless you are making a very concerted effort to do so and know how to avoid slipping up. 


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#7 Just_One_Question

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 11:41 AM

Yes, I agree. What I meant was that she is 99.99% off any records purely by her way of living. Of course, if they really put their mind to it, the most the NSA would be able to find 'relatively easily' would be her public information, the properties she has owned & probably some obscure call logs from back in the days before she lost her hearing. All pretty useless information regarding a regular person, but worth invaluably more if they were researching an actual person of threat to the society.
Too bad the whole surveillance scandals co-occured with the height of the refugee crisis & terrorist attacks. Now, with this situation at hand, many people throughout the world are more then willing to trade some of their privacy for enhanced security. Shame...
Anyways, thank you for your input, as always!
:)

P.S. All these security talks lately have made me somewhat paranoid, so I put some cotton at the bottom and sides of my cell phone case/bag. It is to ensure that when it is in my pocket or by my bed, even if someone is collecting recordings through my feature phone's microphone, they come out all muffled at the other end. I swear, I am starting to feel like one of those 'THE END IS NEAR' type of guys lol. :lmao:

Edited by Just_One_Question, 24 March 2017 - 05:22 PM.


#8 quietman7

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 04:51 AM

The government still gets a lot of information from Census Bureau survey mailings.
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#9 Just_One_Question

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 08:39 AM

The government still gets a lot of information from Census Bureau survey mailings.


I actually love those! lol Statistics put some perspective in place, which I've always liked.
The main & most important difference is that to those I agree and diligently provide myself, whereas I've never agreed to getting my phone calls recorded. Atleast, that's just my opinion on the subject. :)

#10 britechguy

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 08:46 AM

 

The government still gets a lot of information from Census Bureau survey mailings.


I actually love those! lol Statistics put some perspective in place, which I've always liked.
The main & most important difference is that to those I agree and diligently provide myself, whereas I've never agreed to getting my phone calls recorded. Atleast, that's just my opinion on the subject. :)

 

 

Unless memory fails, you are compelled to respond to the Census (and, I might add, as well one should be).  My mother was a census taker many years ago and I still recall the efforts she had to document that she went to in order to contact non-responders in person, on several occasions, before she could stop trying.

 

I don't recall any of the outrages of the last few days involving allowing phone calls to be recorded unknowingly without what has been standard due legal process in the United States for decades now.  There's a lot to be upset about, but not wiretapping, because that remains illegal by law enforcement except under extraordinary circumstances.  It's never been illegal to record phone conversations if both parties are aware of the recording and either can decline to continue after that disclosure is made at the outset.


Brian AKA Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

 

     In a modern society where everyone thinks their opinion deserves to be heard nothing annoys me more than individuals who mistake their personal preferences for fact.

         ~ Commenter TheCruyffGurn on the The Guardian website, 8/13/2014

 

              

 


#11 Just_One_Question

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 09:13 AM

The government still gets a lot of information from Census Bureau survey mailings.


I actually love those! lol Statistics put some perspective in place, which I've always liked.
The main & most important difference is that to those I agree and diligently provide myself, whereas I've never agreed to getting my phone calls recorded. Atleast, that's just my opinion on the subject. :)
 
Unless memory fails, you are compelled to respond to the Census (and, I might add, as well one should be).  My mother was a census taker many years ago and I still recall the efforts she had to document that she went to in order to contact non-responders in person, on several occasions, before she could stop trying.
 
I don't recall any of the outrages of the last few days involving allowing phone calls to be recorded unknowingly without what has been standard due legal process in the United States for decades now.  There's a lot to be upset about, but not wiretapping, because that remains illegal by law enforcement except under extraordinary circumstances.  It's never been illegal to record phone conversations if both parties are aware of the recording and either can decline to continue after that disclosure is made at the outset.

Yes, I understand & I agree. However, ever since the 'Snowden revelations' and the recent scandals, I operate with the mindset that everything that's an electronic activity is being recorded, regardless of it's nature - phone calls, Internet browsing activity, Skype conversations, public cameras, when was street lamp XYZ-123 turned on for 3 hours six years ago, etc.
I think that phone calls being recorded and stored in compressed format for 10+ years or longer, depending on the severity of 'the list' one is on, is just a news-story waiting to happen sometime in the next 15 years.
That's why I joke that I've become kinda paranoid. Even though, to be honest, I don't have much 'to hide', be it from the government or anybody else, I see how this could become a big problem in a different situation in the future. For example, the patron of my high school was taken away and murdered by the authorities, due to his anti-status-quo writings back in the Soviet era, and was only discovered after decades in a mass grave. He was identified by his glass eye, since almost nothing else had been left of him. And all of this for being recorded, albeit willingly, disagreeing with current practices in the nation at the time. We can see something similar nowadays in Turkey with some folks getting small punishments and in some cases even some jailtime for parodying Erdogan, the nation's president. And Turkey is actually among the pretty well-developed countries in the world. Unbelieavable!
All in all, when it comes to this topic, I don't really fear my 'dirty google searches' coming up in public, since, well, it's kinda normal - everybody does it. I do, however, realise the potential destructiveness in such power, to intercept and record electronic activity, getting in the hands of a not-so-moral government or any other organisation.
I apologize, I somewhat strayed away from your post.
Once again, thank you for your input!
:)

#12 Crazy Cat

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Posted 26 March 2017 - 06:26 PM

If your grandma has a medical implant, then she can be tracked.

See pages 35 and 41 of 46. Hardware Security in Nanometer CMOS

Edited by Crazy Cat, 26 March 2017 - 06:29 PM.

 

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#13 Just_One_Question

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Posted 26 March 2017 - 06:42 PM

If your grandma has a medical implant, then she can be tracked.
See pages 35 and 41 of 46. Hardware Security in Nanometer CMOS


She most certainly doesn't. Thank you for the information still! :)

Basically, from what I've read, I concluded that much like the simple & relatively easy to follow rule when somebody wants to eat healthy, you just tell them 'just try not to buy or eat anything with a sealed package!'; if you want to reduce the odds of being electronically tracked and/or recorded by 99%, 'just try not to buy or use anything with a display!'. In my case the only such device in my possession is my smartphone, so if I get rid of it and return to the inconvenient, but rather more secure, snail-mail, I would be officially 'done with this topic'.
:)




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