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Brand New Computer cannot connect to WiFi Old one still does


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#1 fiend-v

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 08:39 PM

My old MSI computer can connect to this wifi at my work just fine, my brand new ASUS can connect, but with no internet access.
My dilemma is, I am currently at work and am not able to unplug or mess with the routers due to me working in a secured government building.

So everything I have tried so far has been on the computer side of things.
I have tried forgetting the network and reconnecting with password. Tried disabling Ipv6. I cannot currently access the internet to reinstall drivers unfortunately.
I am going crazy over here trying to figure out a fix for this. And I have made sure proxy settings were off.
I don't think it will make a difference, but the new computers specs are
ASUS ROG GL502VS-DB71 15.6" Intel Core i7­6700HQ,NVIDIA GTX 1070, 256GB PCIE SSD+1TB HDD

Windows 10 64bit
The computer works through ethernet at my house, and I believe the wireless there.
Since my old computer is working on my work wifi and the other is not, I can only assume it is

an issue with the new computer and this particular wifi.
Any info or help would be deeply appreciated.



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 08:55 PM

Have you talked to your IT folks?

 

They could easily have implemented MAC address filtering where only devices with MAC addresses entered into the router's database are allowed to connect.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

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#3 fiend-v

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 09:03 PM

Have you talked to your IT folks?

 

They could easily have implemented MAC address filtering where only devices with MAC addresses entered into the router's database are allowed to connect.

So since my old computer is still connected, said implementation would mean that my old computer is somehow registered as one of those addresses?
I am a noob when it comes to networking. This could be done without my knowledge?



#4 britechguy

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 09:07 PM

If your existing laptop was set up for the network "way back when" with the assistance of your IT folks, and MAC filtering is being used, they would have put in the MAC address of that machine as a routine part of the setup.  They would not have asked you anything about it, why should they?, if you requested that your computer be given access to the office WiFi.  

 

This is a very common way of adding a fairly tight restriction on who can connect to a WiFi network and allows central control even if someone leaves a given office without having to make everyone change the WiFi password associated with that network.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

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#5 fiend-v

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 09:45 PM

If your existing laptop was set up for the network "way back when" with the assistance of your IT folks, and MAC filtering is being used, they would have put in the MAC address of that machine as a routine part of the setup.  They would not have asked you anything about it, why should they?, if you requested that your computer be given access to the office WiFi.  

 

This is a very common way of adding a fairly tight restriction on who can connect to a WiFi network and allows central control even if someone leaves a given office without having to make everyone change the WiFi password associated with that network.

I haven't had any connection to the IT guy and my personal computer other than them giving me the password to the network.
I have been trying to go through this computers network settings to see if there is anything that I changed to make this work that I forgot about.
I am thinking it could be something to do with the computer being literally brand new out of the box today. Perhaps not having a connection to get proper updates.
Would that be a plausible problem?
And updated: I have been messing around with the DNS and still have not found a fix.

Thank you for the quick replies, by the way. It is really appreciated.



#6 britechguy

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 09:49 PM

My advice to you is to talk to your IT folks tomorrow.  I used to work in and around DC and for several state government agencies.  It is highly unlikely that all that is necessary to connect to internal (as opposed to public) networks is a WiFi password.

 

You're spinning your wheels when there are people who are actually paid to advise you on this stuff.  Let them.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 





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