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No power or charge from AC adapter, blown fuse in plug


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#1 PM_BP_17

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 10:50 AM

I have an Asus n550jv on Win 10.

Yesterday the 3A fuse in the plug on the charger blew and laptop obviously stopped charging. I replaced the fuse with another 3A and this blew immediately after connecting to the mains with the laptop end hooked up.

The laptop was still on at this stage and running off battery without any issue.
I tried a different cable between the block on the charger and the mains and I tried using a 5A fuse, with neither having an effect. The fuse did not blow this time but there is still no charging taking place.
Battery has now run out.
I opened it up, removed the battery and put it back and then tried with the 5A fuse again and still nothing.
There is no sign of burning on the laptop that I can see and no obvious smell.
The charger itself looks to be in prefect condition and I have tried it at multiple mains sockets.
I purchased the laptop second-hand, about a week ago.

Is my issue likely to be a faulty charger or am I looking at something much worse?

Also possibly of note is it has been updated to Windows 10 and I'm not sure if any drivers for AC adapter were changed/needed to be changed by this process.



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 11:37 AM

This has all the hallmarks of a dying, now dead, charger to me.  Get a new one as they're quite cheap (provided you don't insist on OEM, and even those aren't a king's ransom).

 

There are no drivers related to the AC adapter.  All of this is handled at the hardware level (or at least it has been historically).


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

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#3 mjd420nova

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 11:38 AM

I see bunches of laptops with jammed adapter connectors.  Many actually broken loose from the board.  This could cause a short and blow the fuse.  Higher current could have burned open a trace before the fuse could blow.



#4 britechguy

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 11:45 AM

@mjd420nova:  Didn't think of that simply because the original poster didn't mention anything about a "loose/wiggling" connection at the computer, but it could be, that's for sure.

 

@PM_BP_17:  You really should never put a higher rated fuse into any device (provided you know that what was in it is what is supposed to be in it in the first place).  Fuses are meant to blow when necessary.

 

If you want to test the output of your charger it's easy enough to do if you get a multimeter (preferably digital) and use the probes on the respective positive (+) and negative (-) terminal sections of your charger output.  I say "preferably digital" because if you happen to place the probes in reverse these simply read negative whatever voltage is detected whereas old needle style will most often stay pegged at zero and the digital ones are also self-ranging.

 

I'm still betting on a charger that's died, but you need to consider all possibilities and testing charger output is easy.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#5 PM_BP_17

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 01:26 PM

@mjd420nova:  Didn't think of that simply because the original poster didn't mention anything about a "loose/wiggling" connection at the computer, but it could be, that's for sure.

 

@PM_BP_17:  You really should never put a higher rated fuse into any device (provided you know that what was in it is what is supposed to be in it in the first place).  Fuses are meant to blow when necessary.

 

If you want to test the output of your charger it's easy enough to do if you get a multimeter (preferably digital) and use the probes on the respective positive (+) and negative (-) terminal sections of your charger output.  I say "preferably digital" because if you happen to place the probes in reverse these simply read negative whatever voltage is detected whereas old needle style will most often stay pegged at zero and the digital ones are also self-ranging.

 

I'm still betting on a charger that's died, but you need to consider all possibilities and testing charger output is easy.

 

Thanks for the reply. I was hoping to hear something along those lines. I bought the laptop on a bargain so the idea of it being a bum deal was crossing my mind.

To clarify - the connecter at the laptop end is all good, not loose or anything. I'll get around to testing it tomorrow and see what happens - fingers crossed it is just a charger issue.



#6 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 06:44 PM

It's almost certainly the input side of the charger unit, ie the mains voltage side. Judging from your time stamp you live in the same time zone as the UK so your local supply is almost certainly 230-240V AC. To blow a 3A fuse requires a current briefly in excess of 3A, which equates to 700W +. That much power would melt the average laptop.

 

By all means check the ouptut from the charger but don't be surprised if it equals 0V. And as Brian has said, the fuse is an important safety feature and should never be replaced with one of a higher value.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#7 PM_BP_17

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 06:45 AM

New charger arrived today and the issue hasbeen resolved.

Thanks for the help.



#8 britechguy

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 10:37 AM

You're welcome.  Now you're part of the, "Been there, done that, got the T-shirt" club with laptop charger failure.

 

Whether it's a desktop machine or laptop when I see "sudden and inexplicable complete non-functioning" the first thing I check is the power supply unit, whether internal or a charger.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 





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