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HDD - Temperature


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#1 Clade

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 08:24 PM

Sorry, but English is not my official language.
 
Dell N4050, Windows 7, Ultimate, 64bit, 2TB (Seagate) hard disk - working at temperature 52ºC.
 
Lenovo G80, Windows 10, Single language, 64bit. WD (Western Digital) 1 TB hard drive, works at 30 ° C.
 
Worried, therefore, since approximately 2 months ago, HDD was purchased according to the same specifications of Seagate, and it failed after 14 days of use.
 
  There are divergences between university studies and companies ... Some understand that high temperature is relevant in the life of the HDD, others do not
 
Any suggestion?
 
Thank you for your attention!


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#2 britechguy

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 09:19 PM

Based on a quick search of Seagate's website, and without knowing exactly which model you have in your machine, it appears their maximum operating temperature is 60 degrees C.  (See:  http://www.seagate.com/consumer/upgrade/laptop-hdd/#specs).

 

While 52 degrees C is a bit on the warmish side, it's still below the max temperature.

 

The tech specs for the WD drives also indicate 60 as the upper limit.


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#3 hamluis

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 09:18 AM

It's generally accepted that a hard drive with a temperature in excess of 50 Celsius...may be a problem.  It would help to know the specific model drive.

 

http://knowledge.seagate.com/articles/en_US/FAQ/193771en

 

I would add that date of purchase...is no indication of when a hard drive was manufactured.  The manufacturing date should be indicated on the hard drive itself.

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 20 March 2017 - 09:23 AM.


#4 Clade

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 05:51 PM

Based on a quick search of Seagate's website, and without knowing exactly which model you have in your machine, it appears their maximum operating temperature is 60 degrees C.  (See:  http://www.seagate.com/consumer/upgrade/laptop-hdd/#specs).

 

While 52 degrees C is a bit on the warmish side, it's still below the max temperature.

 

The tech specs for the WD drives also indicate 60 as the upper limit.

 

 

It's generally accepted that a hard drive with a temperature in excess of 50 Celsius...may be a problem.  It would help to know the specific model drive.

 

http://knowledge.seagate.com/articles/en_US/FAQ/193771en

 

I would add that date of purchase...is no indication of when a hard drive was manufactured.  The manufacturing date should be indicated on the hard drive itself.

 

Louis

 
-- Controller Map ----------------------------------------------------------
 + Intel® Mobile Express Chipset SATA AHCI Controller [ATA]
 
   - ST2000LM 007-1R8174 SCSI Disk Device
 
   - PLDS DVD+-RW DS-8A8SH SCSI CdRom Device
 
    (1) ST2000LM007-1R8174 : 2000,3 GB [0/0/0, pd1] - st
 
         Model : ST2000LM007-1R8174
        Firmware : SBK2
   Serial Number : WDZ0Y946
       Disk Size : 2000,3 GB (8,4/137,4/2000,3/2000,3)
     Buffer Size : Desconhecido
     Queue Depth : 32
    # of Sectors : 3907029168
   Rotation Rate : 5400 RPM
       Interface : Serial ATA
   Major Version : ACS-3
   Minor Version : ACS-3 Revision 3b
   Transfer Mode : SATA/600 | SATA/600
  Power On Hours : 8 horas
  Power On Count : 31 vezes
     Temperature : 50 C (122 F)
   Health Status : Saudável
        Features : S.M.A.R.T., APM, 48bit LBA, NCQ
       APM Level : 8080h [ON]
       AAM Level : ----
    Drive Letter : C: D:
 
Louis!
 
The failed hard drive was produced in November 2016.
 
I do not remember, hard drive working at such temperature, only those last two, to which I referred.
 
The notebook will be 5 years old on April 20th.
 
Continuing this situation, I have a support table where there is ventilation, which reduces the temperature of the hard disk
 
 


#5 hamluis

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 08:24 PM

The health status reflected in the data provided is "healthy".

 

Typically...I would expect the drive temp to be somewhere near the low 30s...as you reported for the other drive.

 

Are you buying refurbished hard drives...or brand new ones?  I think that I would purchase from another business entity or online from reliable vendors like Newegg and Amazon.

 

My experiences with any drive that was over 50 Celsius...were all a case of the drive malfunctioning eventually.

 

Louis



#6 Clade

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 09:00 PM

Dear Louis!
 
That is what I think, temperatures at most close to 40ºC.
 
The hard drive is new. I have just written to the seller about this high temperature. I will see if he will report
 
Buying stores outside of Brazil, government surcharge, I'm not sure, but at 60%.
 
Today, here, beginning the fall, then ...


#7 hamluis

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 05:37 AM

Let us know what the seller has to say :).

 

Louis



#8 Clade

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 10:45 AM

Let us know what the seller has to say :).

 

Louis

 

Here is the answer from the seller:
 
"Thanks for the contact.
 
I apologize for the incorrect information.
 
Really the same for HDs should work at temperatures averaging 40 degrees.
 
But I noticed that in some devices (customer feedback) the same in use can reach 49/50 degrees in a common way.
 
The same at temperatures above 55 degrees may present problems.
 
Any questions, we are available.
 
Thank you".


#9 britechguy

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 10:55 AM

Also, if you look at the various manufacturers' websites (and the site that hamluis posted the link to) there are all sorts of factors that can affect the temperature at which precisely the same drive operates "on average" in different hardware.  If you've got a machine with "bad cooling circulation" the drive will run warmer than in one where it's good.

 

Whenever possible the two things I do are to check what the manufacturer has to say about maximum "OK" operating temperature for a given model and then to see what others who have my same hardware are seeing - whether with the same exact drive model or with others because if you know what the manufacturer notes as the maximum you have some sense of what's "warm to hot" for any given drive.

 

In general I see a lot more hand-wringing about hardware temperatures in general than seems to me to be productive, particularly for CPU/APU temperatures.  A lot of the utilities that are used to check these, and that give color coded warnings, do not keep their databases up to date as far a what the manufacturer gives as the safe operating range.  Even that Seagate page has a note that newer versions of their drives now have a 60 degree C maximum operating temperature (not that one would want that as the constant "normal").

 

Everything is relative, and it always pays to check out what your hardware manufacturer has to say about what a given piece of hardware will tolerate.  Most will easily tolerate the occasional temperature spike above "maximum OK" when they're being worked to death for a brief period.   It's chronic "running very warm to hot" that can, and not always does, kill things prematurely.   I have a decades old Acer laptop where the exhaust air can almost light paper on fire but that's been how it ran since day one.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#10 Clade

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 11:11 AM

Also, if you look at the various manufacturers' websites (and the site that hamluis posted the link to) there are all sorts of factors that can affect the temperature at which precisely the same drive operates "on average" in different hardware.  If you've got a machine with "bad cooling circulation" the drive will run warmer than in one where it's good.

 

Whenever possible the two things I do are to check what the manufacturer has to say about maximum "OK" operating temperature for a given model and then to see what others who have my same hardware are seeing - whether with the same exact drive model or with others because if you know what the manufacturer notes as the maximum you have some sense of what's "warm to hot" for any given drive.

 

In general I see a lot more hand-wringing about hardware temperatures in general than seems to me to be productive, particularly for CPU/APU temperatures.  A lot of the utilities that are used to check these, and that give color coded warnings, do not keep their databases up to date as far a what the manufacturer gives as the safe operating range.  Even that Seagate page has a note that newer versions of their drives now have a 60 degree C maximum operating temperature (not that one would want that as the constant "normal").

 

Everything is relative, and it always pays to check out what your hardware manufacturer has to say about what a given piece of hardware will tolerate.  Most will easily tolerate the occasional temperature spike above "maximum OK" when they're being worked to death for a brief period.   It's chronic "running very warm to hot" that can, and not always does, kill things prematurely.   I have a decades old Acer laptop where the exhaust air can almost light paper on fire but that's been how it ran since day one.

 

Dear Britechguy.
 
Right.!
 
What worries me, is that only the last hard drives is that the temperature is above 50ºC, so the post, even comparing with another brand / equipment.
 
Even today, I contacted Seagate to explain these issues. If there is a return, I'll post it here.


#11 Clade

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Posted 26 March 2017 - 03:05 PM

Through the serial number, the hard disk
 
How boring to get in touch with this company. Facebook, one of the options, have not yet read.
 
Impressive as there is a certain disregard for the consumer.
 
Companies must have an after-sales department that responds objectively, noting that not everyone likes to access social pages. . . Pure and simple contact would suffice.
 
The disc works at a temperature of up to 60 ° C:
 


#12 britechguy

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Posted 26 March 2017 - 04:03 PM

What I find almost funny is how they list the operating temperature (range, obviously) as 0°-60° C, followed immediately by "Nonoperating temperature" (displayed as a range, -40°C-70°C, which it's not), that would completely overlap the operating temperature range.  These are obviously "drop dead temperatures" where if it's  -40°C or colder it will shut down or, likewise, if it's 70°C or hotter.  


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#13 Clade

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 04:53 AM

The following is the answer from Seagate Brazil technical support:
 
Dear sir,
 
Thank you for contacting Seagate Technical Support.
 
I regret this inconvenience.
 
It will be my pleasure to help you.
 
I understand that you have doubts about the temperature so that the disk works perfectly.
 
Mr. Luiz, I hereby announce that you are receiving an indication not to cause any problems.
 
In addition, information on a single power system for the safety, test or SeaTools test to know the status of your device.
 
Perform the test with the SeaTools for Dos diagnostic software (basic tests: fast and complete).
 
To download Seatools for DOS, please click on the link below:
 
 
Please respond to this email if you need assistance or contact us through the link:
 
 
The opening hours are from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm CST.
 
In the next few days you will receive an email of our interaction, it includes the link of a survey to evaluate our service.
 
The software indicated for use in hard disk scanning, could not find the hard disk. On another occasion, he had taken the test.
 
Yesterday and today, working with other equipment, with hard drives WD and Samsung, in the room, without air conditioning, even demanding of the disk rídigo, with several processes and updates, the temperature is stable at 36ºC.
 
I'm thinking of opening a post requesting the negative and positive experience regarding different brands of hard drives.
 
Thanks everyone!


#14 Clade

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Posted 04 April 2017 - 12:53 PM

And to close, as the Seagate support said the disk had opened, in the face of inquiries on this issue, follows the last email received from Seagate technical support:
 
Dear sir
 
Thank you for contacting Seagate Technical Support.
 
Unfortunately this HD that you have, belonged to an external HD, in this case we do not offer any type of support.


#15 hamluis

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Posted 04 April 2017 - 01:59 PM

You purchased a refurb drive?

 

Louis






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