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Startup Issues After Power Outage


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#1 Jackofblaze

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 05:45 PM

So, last night my desktop was shutdown by a power outage while I was asleep. Starting the PC back up, Windows failed to launch and attempted automatic repair, which failed. I've had this sort of thing happen before, and usually it gets resolved simply through a restart. However, this time that was not the case. I began attempting to fix the problem through the advanced startup options menu. First thing I tried was manually choosing startup repair, but this ended the same way automatic repair did. Next thing I tried was going into startup settings, and restarting through that so I'd get the option to enable safe mode. PC restarts, menu opens, and I choose enable safe mode. PC goes immediately to Windows startup, automatic repair is attempted again, fails, and I'm back in the advanced startup options menu. I start doing some searching on the Internet, and find this thread: https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/all/s...

Some of the answers suggested using the command prompt to use some commands. First thing they suggest is trying "bootrec /fixmbr" followed by "bootrec /fixboot". I run both and both complete successfully, but on restarting, auto-repair starts and fails again and I'm back to the advanced startup options. I run chkdsk, and a few things stand out: "Read-only chkdsk found bad on-disk uppercase table - using system table." "Errors detected in uppercase file." "Windows has checked the file system and found problems. Run CHKDSK with the /F (fix) option to correct these." "Failed to transfer logged messages to the event log with status 50." So I try CHKDSK /F, and all I get is the type of the file system (NTFS) and two lines: "Cannot lock current drive. Windows cannot run disk checking on this volume because it is write protected." So, at this point I'm pretty lost, and only have Internet forums to go on. I do more searching and find a thread about this issue: https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windo...

In this one, they suggest using the command "chkdsk C: /f /r /x". I try this, and it goes smoothly, with "Windows has scanned the file system and found no problems. No further action required." Restart again, same thing, no dice. At this point, I'm pretty perplexed. I decide to try a system restore, unsure if I have any recent restore points. But sure enough, I have a couple recent ones, one from two days prior (system update) and one from four days prior (automatic restore point). I try both, but at the end of both I'm met with this error:

"System Restore did not complete successfully. Your computer's system files and
settings were not changed.

Details:
System Restore failed while restoring the directory from the restore point.
Source: AppxStaging
Destination: %ProgramFiles%\WindowsApps
An unspecified error occurred during System Restore. (0x80070091)"

Again, I search this error, and find a thread about it, in which a responder suggested renaming the WindowsApps folder, and links to another thread detailing how to do this: http://borncity.com/win/2017/02/22/windows10-version-16...

In this thread, he suggests the following commands to rename the folder:

cd C:\Program Files

takeown /f WindowsApps /r /d Y

icacls WindowsApps /grant

%USERDOMAIN%\%USERNAME%: (F) /t

attrib WindowsApps -h

rename WindowsApps WindowsApps.old

However, this quickly doesn't go well as after I enter the first line it says that it can't find the path specified. So that's where I'm at. As far as I can tell, my only chances are this fix, repairing via Windows 10 installation disc (which I'd have to purchase), or a reset, which, as I don't want to lose my apps and files if at all possible, is my last resort. This has been a rather trying process, hopefully somebody has some suggestions. Thanks for any help.

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#2 garioch7

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 05:48 AM

Jackofblaze:
 
:welcome: to the Bleeping Computer Windows 10 Forum.  Unfortunately, I may not have good news for you.  I encountered almost the same situation, but my problem was related to a March Windows 10 update (KB4013429).  You can find my topic here.  I am wondering whether it was the power outage or that Windows update that borked your Windows ... ?
 
The error messages were the same for me, as for you.  Like you, Automatic Repair could not repair and System Restore points could not be restored.  Fortunately, I do full system images of all partitions on my computer weekly, so that was what saved me.  I had to boot from the backup program recovery disk and restore my most recent image.  Then I ran SFC and DISM, the latter which fixed some errors, and then got the Windows Update to install, and it has been smooth sailing since.
 
I sure hope that you have a recent system backup.  I wanted to avoid a system reset, which appeared to be the next logical option at the time, if the backup software had failed me.  Having learned that there was file system corruption, another option for me, had I known that, would have been to boot from a Startup Repair disk and select command prompt with networking, and try to run the command:
 

dism /online /cleanup-image /restorehealth

 
 
If that failed, then one could go to another computer and download the compatible Windows 10 .iso file, burn it to USB drive or DVD, and then point DISM to the source files, if it couldn't get online.  More information about using DISM can be found in this topic.
 
Let us know how you make out.  Good luck and have a great day.
 
Regards,
-Phil


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#3 Jackofblaze

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 05:10 AM

Thanks for the welcome, and thanks for trying to assist me. Alright, so I've tried a couple different things now, but both have failed. I tried using this Boot Repair Disk: https://sourceforge.net/projects/boot-repair-cd/ , though I'm not exactly certain this is what you were referring to when mentioning booting from a Startup Repair disk. However, running the recommended repair with that thing didn't seem to change anything. I downloaded the Windows 10 .iso file and burned it to a USB. After it booted, I went to the repair installation option, and from there, went into troubleshoot, and command prompt. As per the instructions in the link you posted about DISM, I attempted to point it to the source files using the command DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth /Source:F:\Sources\install.wim. However, I was met with this error message: 

 

Error: 50 

DISM does not support servicing Windows PE with the /Online option. 

The DISM log file can be found at X:\windows\Logs\DISM\dism.log


Edited by Jackofblaze, 20 March 2017 - 05:11 AM.


#4 garioch7

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 12:51 PM

Jackofblaze:

 

Sorry to hear that DISM was not successful.  I did some "googling" of the Error and found this article.  I am not sure if that will correct your problem.  I would definitely backup the registry BEFORE attempting that, with a utility like the Tweaking.com Registry Backup program.  I use that weekly.

 

Hopefully someone else with more expertise will join the conversation.

 

Here is an article of Windows System Repair disks.  I create them for all computers that I own or service.  You have to scroll down about half way in the article to see how to create and use Windows System Repair disks.

 

Good luck and have a great day.

 

Regards,

-Phil


Member of the Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators


#5 Jackofblaze

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 09:50 AM

I wasn't quite confident about the registry stuff just yet, and I wanted to see if I could find a way to get DISM to work without the /Online handle. Searching, I found it was indeed possible due to this page: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh824869.aspx . I could just use a little help making sure I fully understand how I should be going about this. It states:

"to repair an offline image using a mounted image as a repair source, at a command prompt, type the following command:

Dism /Image:C:\offline /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth /Source:c:\test\mount\windows
 

So, when it says using a mounted image, are they referring to launching from the Windows 10 .iso I have on a flash drive, and using that to help repair my Windows 10 installation's image? If I'm understanding this correctly, I would use the drive letter of the flash drive for the image: part, and the file path to my install.wim file for the source part, correct?


Edited by Jackofblaze, 21 March 2017 - 10:00 AM.


#6 garioch7

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 10:17 AM

Jackofblaze:

Thank you for your post. I am not an expert on the subject of mounting offline DISM images, but I did find this link.  I have never done that before.

 

From what I understand, you mount the offline source first and then run the command that you located, and cited above.

 

I don't think that you are supposed are supposed to launch the Windows .iso file that is going to act as the source for DISM to repair component files, BUT, as I said, I am not an expert on the subject.

 

Good luck and have a great day.

 

Regards,

-Phil

 


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#7 Jackofblaze

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 12:02 PM

Well, I couldn't get anything to work, and was getting tired of this issue, so I just decided to end it. Just got a new SSD (been planning to for a while anyway), installed Windows 10 on it, and made it my boot drive. Everything went smoothly, and I can now easily access the HDD through windows explorer.



#8 garioch7

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 01:35 PM

Jackofblaze:

 

I am glad to hear that your problem is resolved, and you got a shiny new SSD in the process! :)

 

Thanks for getting back to us.

 

Have a great weekend.

 

Regards,

-Phil


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