Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

HDD failing, unable to switch for unknown BIOS admin password


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 PhauxFenix

PhauxFenix

  • Members
  • 8 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 17 March 2017 - 06:55 AM

First I would like to apologize if I am posting in the wrong section of the forums but I looked and this seemed to be the best one. Anyway, here's the deal, I have a toshiba satellite S55t-C5222 laptop that I bought from costco in mn, it was the only one left, a display model and there is a password on the bios preventing me from replacing the HDD, changing the boot order, booting from a USB device, etc. and as I stated in the topic title, my HDD is failing and I need to replace it soon. the only chip on the mother board that I saw that could be the bios had the word/name Nuvoton on it if that helps. I am running windows 10 education edition. There is no CMOS battery or jumpers on the motherboard. The steps I have taken are as follows (though not in this particular order);

1. Re-flashed the bios with the same version

2. Powered the laptop off, removed battery, waited 2 hours and restarted

3. Attempted to use a CMOS setting erase utility.

4. Attempted to enter default/backdoor passwords

5. Contacted costco and asked for help

6. Contacted toshiba and asked for help (the only thing they offered was for me to ship my laptop to them to replace both the HDD and the motherboard for $400. Which I could do myself for much cheaper.)

 

I realize that this is a bit much to ask, though I would appreciate help as fast as possible, please, as this is the only working computer or laptop I have and I need it for daily use.

 

Thanks in advance,

PhauFenix


Edited by Al1000, 20 March 2017 - 09:43 AM.
moved from Windows 10 Discussion


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 6,819 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:06:33 AM

Posted 17 March 2017 - 08:19 AM

I'm not quite sure where this topic belongs, but it probably won't get the most traction here.

 

The only thing I could recommend is cloning your primary hard drive to its replacement and then just swapping them.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 


#3 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 22,597 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:06:33 AM

Posted 17 March 2017 - 09:46 AM

Did some googling and in fact this computer does not have a CMOS battery. I am not sure what Toshiba was thinking or how BIOS settings are saved unless it's some kind of flash memory powered by the main battery. 

 

As britechguy suggested if you can boot to Windows then replacing the hard drive should be sufficient if you can access the boot menu. Can you access the boot menu by tapping F12? If not remove the hard drive and boot. Does a boot menu open?

 

Edit: How were you able to boot into Windows Education if there is a BIOS password set? This password is only shown when trying to access BIOS settings?

 

Both the BIOS and Supervisor password prompts appear immediately after the computer is started or restarted, or taken out of Standby mode. Once a BIOS or Supervisor password is set, the computer will only start Windows (or any other operating system) after that password is entered correctly.

Entering either a BIOS password or a Supervisor password permit normal use of the computer. The difference between them is that if the Supervisor password is set, it must be entered in order to change system settings. Exactly which settings require the Supervisor password permission varies from model to model. Knowing the Supervisor password makes it possible to change the BIOS password, without knowing it.

 

 

http://support.toshiba.com/support/viewContentDetail?contentId=108503

 

If you cannot access the boot menu then I think your only option other than paying Toshiba is to see this guide but as the warning suggests, this could brick your computer and I highly doubt you want to take that risk.

 

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/617188/resetting-the-bios-supervisor-password-with-debug-command/


Edited by JohnC_21, 17 March 2017 - 09:59 AM.


#4 PhauxFenix

PhauxFenix
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 8 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 19 March 2017 - 05:30 AM

Did some googling and in fact this computer does not have a CMOS battery. I am not sure what Toshiba was thinking or how BIOS settings are saved unless it's some kind of flash memory powered by the main battery. 

 

As britechguy suggested if you can boot to Windows then replacing the hard drive should be sufficient if you can access the boot menu. Can you access the boot menu by tapping F12? If not remove the hard drive and boot. Does a boot menu open?

 

Edit: How were you able to boot into Windows Education if there is a BIOS password set? This password is only shown when trying to access BIOS settings?

 

Both the BIOS and Supervisor password prompts appear immediately after the computer is started or restarted, or taken out of Standby mode. Once a BIOS or Supervisor password is set, the computer will only start Windows (or any other operating system) after that password is entered correctly.

Entering either a BIOS password or a Supervisor password permit normal use of the computer. The difference between them is that if the Supervisor password is set, it must be entered in order to change system settings. Exactly which settings require the Supervisor password permission varies from model to model. Knowing the Supervisor password makes it possible to change the BIOS password, without knowing it.

 

 

http://support.toshiba.com/support/viewContentDetail?contentId=108503

 

If you cannot access the boot menu then I think your only option other than paying Toshiba is to see this guide but as the warning suggests, this could brick your computer and I highly doubt you want to take that risk.

 

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/617188/resetting-the-bios-supervisor-password-with-debug-command/

 

JohnC_21,

To answer your questions, I am able to access both the boot menu and the BIOS settings the only thing is that with the BIOS settings I only have access to limited functions such as setting the date and time, but that's about the only thing I am able to do. As for the computer asking me for a password when I boot up, it never has. I have tried putting the HDD in using the following methods;

1. Put in HDD straight from package without any prep and attempted to use Microsoft USB/DVD Boot Disk Creator using a usb drive to install Win10 Education. Seemed to successfully install, but when I rebooted, I got an error message saying "Windows did not install correctly. Please run setup again." I tried this 3 times total.

2. Using my old HDD, I formatted, partitioned the drive, and installed Windows 7 Home Premium using command prompt, put the new HDD back into the computer and booted.

3. I tried to install Windows 7 Home Premium from the installation DVD.

Nothing worked.

If it makes any difference, the only reason why I have the Education edition is that I wanted to be able to disable ms windows defender with gpedit.msc. I got a legal copy from dreamspark a while ago, and the school does Not have any admin rights on it. As for yours and britechguy's suggestion to clone the drive, I cannot do that because the drive is apparently damaged and/or there are way to many corrupted/bad sectors to successfully clone the drive.



#5 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 6,819 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:06:33 AM

Posted 19 March 2017 - 10:01 AM

PhauxFenix,

 

         If the machine still boots with the damaged drive that's enough to be able to clone it successfully and then to patch up any issues or reinstall Windows 10 after the fact on the new drive.

 

         All disc cloning software I'm aware of does not transfer bad sectors and if the drive is "OK enough" to allow you to boot this may be the only way you can solve the problem presented by your situation unless you find a way to get full access to UEFI/BIOS.

 

         Yes, it's a workaround, but that's all I've got given the constraints.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 


#6 PhauxFenix

PhauxFenix
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 8 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 19 March 2017 - 05:25 PM

PhauxFenix,

 

         If the machine still boots with the damaged drive that's enough to be able to clone it successfully and then to patch up any issues or reinstall Windows 10 after the fact on the new drive.

 

         All disc cloning software I'm aware of does not transfer bad sectors and if the drive is "OK enough" to allow you to boot this may be the only way you can solve the problem presented by your situation unless you find a way to get full access to UEFI/BIOS.

 

         Yes, it's a workaround, but that's all I've got given the constraints.

Okay, so which cloning software would you recommend and how would I clone the drive as this is the only laptop I have and I have no spare cash at the present time for a hardware cloner?

From what I understand, the only way a drive can be cloned is if it is not currently in use.

Thank you everyone for your patience and all your help,

PhauxFenix


Edited by PhauxFenix, 19 March 2017 - 05:27 PM.


#7 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 6,819 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:06:33 AM

Posted 19 March 2017 - 05:43 PM

I have used Miray HDClone (current version is 6, I've used earlier), which has a free basic version, but there are lots of others.

 

It's been a very long time since I last performed disc cloning but I don't seem to recall that you cannot clone a drive that's currently installed and in use, but if it is that means you'll have to borrow a friend's machine for the clone process.   I do remember that I had only one external cable and I had the drive being cloned to sitting there on the table as it was being cloned, which suggests to me that I wasn't doing an "external bad drive to external good drive" clone, but I could be wrong.

 

You'll need a USB to correct drive format cable to do this, and they're cheap.  I just don't know the age of your machine and whether we could be talking IDE versus SATA and there are combination cables available.  I'd suspect SATA if I had to guess, though.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 


#8 PhauxFenix

PhauxFenix
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 8 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 20 March 2017 - 04:46 PM

I was able to fix this finally, by taking a hdd out of a laptop that I had that was not working, (cracked LCD, blown battery, burned motherboard), anyway, luckily the hdd was still working perfectly and had windows 10 pro on it. I put that in my laptop, booted into safe mode, did a reinstalled windows via the windows refresh method, booted into a new windows 10 setup, put my windows 10 education serial in, and viola! Good as new! Minus all my files from my old drive of course. Which if someone would please help me with a little problem I'm having trying to access the files from my backup drive, please go to this posting - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/642568/possible-to-copy-registry-keys-andor-files-instead-of-migrating-entire-drive/

 

Thank you everyone for all of your help, I really appreciated it.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users