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Computer not powering up


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#1 Spotdoggy

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 06:17 AM

Hi guys,
 
Excuse me as I'm a bit of a hardware newbie, but about 10 months ago I built my first computer, and all has been fine during that time until now. Recently (in the last week) on one morning I randomly noticed that on my Windows start screen the time was pretty much exactly an hour slower than it should have been, and not thinking too much about it, I logged in and carried on playing games and with my day (I did double check that I may have forgot daylight savings time had ended or something).
 
Fast forward a few days later and tonight when I come home from work, my computer does not boot up at all and is completely unresponsive - no fans trying to start or power lights from the front led's when I press the power button, although my usb hub plugged into one of the front usb ports does seem to have power as the activated usb ports on the hub show a blue light to indicate they are switched on.
 
I've tried plugging it into multiple power points, but the same result there. I tried a different power cable, but no dice there either so I've ruled that out. I figured it might be the PSU so I have tried the paperclip test, and that does seem to start the PSU, as the fan starts up. I know that doesn't test the PSU under load, but for now I've put that aside and think it could be something else. In case it was the power switch at the front of the case, I've disconnected it from my motherboard and tried shorting the power pins with a screwdriver, but no response there at all. I've taken my ram out and video card and tried again but still nothing.
 
I'm a bit confused where to go from here - is there some way the CMOS battery has anything to do with this due to the possibly coincidental time issue prior to this, or is it more likely a dead motherboard or even PSU? One thing that confuses me is how my USB ports are presumably still getting power, would this happen even with a dead motherboard?
 
My PC specs are:
Gigabyte H170-HD3 motherboard
Corsair CX600M power supply
MSI R9 390X video card
Intel i5 3550 cpu
Corsair Vengeance 16gb x 2
256gb SSD
2TB HDD
 
Any suggestions or advice would be greatly appreciated :)


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#2 jonuk76

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 11:33 AM

By the sounds of it, the most likely candidates are the motherboard or power supply.  Corrupted CMOS - possible, but usually when that is the culprit the PC will still power on, but not do anything else (just sit there with the fans running, and no screen output).  Personally, I'd dismantle the PC, remove the motherboard from the case, and check for any visible damage to it (scratches, any sign of a burnt track etc.) and if nothing visible, reset the CMOS and attempt to get it to power on outside of the case (rest it on a non conductive surface e.g. anti static bag it was supplied in) with just the bare minimum components installed - 1 RAM stick, integrated GPU if applicable, keyboard, but no drives or anything else.  This rules out the possibility of anything on the case shorting the motherboard.

 

Power supply, the fact it turns on is encouraging.  As you said, under no load is a different story from under load though.  I have had a situation where a system would power on but wouldn't complete POST or do much else - on opening the case the slow running of the case fans and GPU fans was a giveaway that it was power related though.  The fact it's not turning on at all doesn't rule out the power supply though, and the easiest way to rule it out entirely is to try another one.

 

Good luck!

 

Also I guess it's a typo or mistake copying info from somewhere but the I5-3550 CPU and Gigabyte H170-HD3 are not compatible at the CPU socket level.  That CPU code is for an older Ivy Bridge CPU (Socket 1155) while the mobo is for Skylake generation (Skt 1151) processors


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#3 Drillingmachine

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 11:36 AM

Probably dead motherboard if even screwdriver trick is not doing anything. CMOS battery should only have effect on keeping BIOS settings.

#4 Spotdoggy

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 02:28 PM

Thanks very much for the replies and information guys, I figured it was likely a motherboard issue but wanted to get some advice from people in the know before I jumped ahead and started buying components but might have overlooked something.

The 3550 was a typo after a few frustrated beers, it is actually a 6500 (don't ask me how I got 3550 our of that...). I'll see if I can track down an alternate PSU for the time being to try and completely rule that out before I look at a new motherboard.

Another question since I've never really had these issues - I bought all the components through a semi-local supplier and was only 10 months ago so presumably the parts are still under warranty - can I contact them about that or would they tell me to contact Gigabyte itself regarding the motherboard warranty, or would there be some kind of clause with them that I'm not covered since I built the systen myself and they'd just say component failure is likely my fault from incorrect setup?

Thanks again for your prior responses.

#5 Drillingmachine

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 02:39 PM

If motherboard is broken, it probably goes into warranty. Problem is that there may be other part(s) broken than motherboard.

If you built that machine yourself, it's your responsibility to determine what's broken. That kind of service "determine what's broken on computer" is often offered by local computer shops however.

#6 MDD1963

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 05:37 PM

Most would disconnect as much as possible, eliminating all but PSU and mainboard, and one stick of RAM (alternate, in case first stick is bad) in required slot...

 

(DIsconnect power and SATA connections to drives, remove GPU, etc....; if your CPU does not support integrated video, you should at least get error codes/beeps to reflect no GPU found))

 

If unit still won't power on, at some point you will need either a known good PSU to try your rig with, or, test your PSU in another known good rig. (PSU 'testers' might identify completely dead units, but, otherwise are useless for lack of any real load on PSU)


Asus Z270A Prime/7700K/32 GB DDR4-3200/GTX1060


#7 ranchhand_

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 06:59 PM

 

my USB ports are presumably still getting power, would this happen even with a dead motherboard?

Yes, it could. Mobo's are extremely complicated, and one area may still get power, although another is dead. One thing I might suggest for future reference is to get yourself a power supply tester. The paper clip method is great for checking if there is continuity, but useless for verifying that each rail is getting proper voltages, especially the CPU.

If you are not getting POST on the screen, you have a low-level equipment failure. That only can be caused by one of 4 things: a failed or corrupted BIOS/CMOS, a failed power supply, a failed CPU, a failed motherboard, and (on rare occasion), totally failed memory chips. The two most common things I have experienced are power supplys and motherboards.


Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#8 Spotdoggy

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 07:38 PM

Thanks for the replies guys, I ended up disconnecting everything like the GPU and ram and still nothing was happening. I then took it to a technician friends' place and he had a PSU tester and extra PSU, and on testing it seemed like I was getting steady voltage so we tried the spare PSU to make sure and still no response. We were fairly certain at that point that it was dead mobo so I ended up taking my old one back and sending it off as a warranty claim, but bought a newer overclockable one anyway. I put everything back together with the new motherboard and all is fine now.

 

It has definitely made me keen to learn more about the hardware side of things and get a few tools that will help diagnose problems like this in the future. Thanks again for all the help :)



#9 jonuk76

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 12:58 AM

Good to hear you got to the bottom of it :) Consumer protection varies by country but I think they would have to have evidence there was user or installation error involved in the boards problems in order to deny a claim.  They can't just deny it because it's a self build.


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