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Is it possible to bridge 2 routers together wireless without an ethernet cord


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#1 gizzard

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 12:16 AM

I'd like to extend the wireless range of my homenetwork to a "deadzone" (only getting 2mbs in there)

 

I also do not want to drill any holes to extend it via ethernet cord, I prefer wirelessly.



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#2 Wand3r3r

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 01:00 AM

You have to have a unit that can extend via wireless.  You would see that in the web interface or the docs.  Router or Routers may benefit from a DD-WRT upgrade. Consider powerline equipment instead.



#3 gizzard

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 04:58 PM

You have to have a unit that can extend via wireless.  You would see that in the web interface or the docs.  Router or Routers may benefit from a DD-WRT upgrade. Consider powerline equipment instead.

What would that feature be called?

 

Is Powerline a brand? I googled it and it came up with Linksys, Netgear, etc.

 

I am confused.



#4 Wand3r3r

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 08:40 PM

I can understand.  No drilling required :-)

 

Powerline is a brand name for a particular type of networking which uses your home electrical wiring as network wiring.  You can make network connections between different locations in the house.  They plug into your power outlets. Lots of different choice combinations available

 

Concerning your question about router features that support wireless connection between the two it depends on nomenclature. Some manufactures use "bridging" others " "extender" and others " 'AP' access point".  Feature is to connect via wifi to another router/AP

 

Post your router models and its a pretty easy lookup via google


Edited by Wand3r3r, 05 March 2017 - 08:42 PM.


#5 gizzard

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 10:10 PM

I can understand.  No drilling required :-)

 

Powerline is a brand name for a particular type of networking which uses your home electrical wiring as network wiring.  You can make network connections between different locations in the house.  They plug into your power outlets. Lots of different choice combinations available

 

Concerning your question about router features that support wireless connection between the two it depends on nomenclature. Some manufactures use "bridging" others " "extender" and others " 'AP' access point".  Feature is to connect via wifi to another router/AP

 

Post your router models and its a pretty easy lookup via google

Got it.

 

I read that those wall adapters only output half speed. That is to say half of the signals communicate with the router the other half sends to your PC so you get only half internet speeds through the wall adapter.

 

I have this one

 

https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-DOCSIS-Cable-Router-C3000-100NAS/dp/B00IF0JAIU?th=1

 

It doesn't say anything about being able to bridge but it says it is compatible with a desktop wi-fi extender and wall plug



#6 Wand3r3r

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 12:49 AM

half speed? naw unless you have crappy electrical :-)

 

You misread what send and receive with Ethernet means.  Lets say you have a 100mb duplex connection [you should google duplex vs simplex communication]. 

that is a one way measurement.  Both ways adds up to 200mbps.

 

And that has nothing to do with what you should be concerned about.

 

If you want to connect via wifi in this dead zone by a powerline connector for Ethernet for a router connection.  Buy a wifi end point so you can bring wifi to the dead zone.

 

Do your home work. Know what you are buying and why :-)






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