Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Windows 10 setup guide


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Cynthia Moore

Cynthia Moore

  • Members
  • 288 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:07:47 PM

Posted 02 March 2017 - 03:06 AM

I am about to upgrade two creaky old Win XP machines to shiny new Win 10 machines. The tech I hired to set up the XP machines did a few things wrong, some of which I had to pay someone else to fix and others I have had to live with. I don't want to make the same mistake this time around. So I have a couple of questions:

  1. Is there a step-by-step guide or tutorial that will walk me through getting these new machines set up properly?
  2. Is there a step-by-step guide or tutorial that will walk me through obtaining and installing the most robust collection of anti-malware applications?
  3. Is there any way for me to find a local tech to help me in person if I need it? I am in Silicon Valley. I have tried 3-4 techs, some of whom came highly recommended. None of them seemed really competent to me. Is there maybe a national company, like Geek Squad, that is reliable?

One of the new machines will be a Dell laptop and the other will be a Microsoft Surface Pro 4.


Running Win 10 & Office 365.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Rocky Bennett

Rocky Bennett

  • Members
  • 2,755 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Mexico, USA
  • Local time:08:47 PM

Posted 02 March 2017 - 06:44 AM

Are you sure that one of them is Microsoft Surface Pro 4? That is not old creaky https://www.amazon.com/Microsoft-Surface-Pro-Intel-Core/dp/B01605ZRBK Seriouly, I don't think that machine would even run Windows XP without doing it in a virtualbox. As far as the Dell, what model is it? The problem with converting any old computer to run Windows 10 is the lack or drivers. Most computers that were made to run Windows XP will never be able to run Windows 10.

 

 

Here is a little guide that may or may not help you, because I think that your project will have quite a lot of difficulties.

 

https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/1950-windows-10-clean-install.html

 

In fact, if you have not spent the $200 for licenses yet, I would hold off and not buy the licenses until after you attempt a clean install because more than likely the old Dell may never be able to run Windows 10. The Microsoft Surface Pro 4 shipped with Windows 10 pre-installed.


594965_zpsp5exvyzm.png


#3 Allan

Allan

  • BC Advisor
  • 8,614 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Jersey
  • Local time:10:47 PM

Posted 02 March 2017 - 07:26 AM

First you want to be sure the systems are capable of running W10: http://www.zdnet.com/article/will-your-pc-run-windows-10-use-this-well-hidden-compatibility-checker-to-find-out/

 

Then, here's a step by step guide: http://www.zdnet.com/article/how-to-migrate-from-windows-xp-to-windows-10-in-8-reboots-or-less/



#4 Cynthia Moore

Cynthia Moore
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 288 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:07:47 PM

Posted 02 March 2017 - 09:24 AM

I see now that my original post was not clear enough. Sorry about that.

 

I should have said that I am replacing two creaky old XP machines with two shiny new Win 10 machines. I am not planning to keep the old machines except just long enough to migrate all of the data over to the new machines. The old machines are both Dells. One is a workstation and the other is a notebook. I use both machines when I am at home and I take the notebook with me when I travel. They are connected via a local area P2P network via cat5 cables and we also have a WiFi network. They share several folders containing client data and one law firm application (Time Matters), The version of Time Matters that I am currently using will support multiple users over a P2P network. The latest version requires a dedicated server. My plan is to use a cloud server, rather than buy a physical server.

 

I hope that is clearer. With that in mind, here are my questions:

  1. Is there a step-by-step guide or tutorial that will walk me through getting these new machines set up properly? The ones that I am looking at come with Windows and Office already installed. So I assume I just need to customize them for my needs. Our old Dell machines came with a lot of crapware already installed, too, which I had to remove. So I'm looking for help making sure that they are configured optimally.
  2. Is there a step-by-step guide or tutorial that will walk me through obtaining and installing the most robust collection of anti-malware applications?
  3. Is there a step-by-step guide or tutorial that will walk me through copying my data over from the old machines?
  4. Is there any way for me to find a local tech to help me in person if I need it? I am in Silicon Valley. I have tried 3-4 techs, some of whom came highly recommended. None of them seemed really competent to me. Is there maybe a national company, like Geek Squad, that is reliable?

Thanks


Running Win 10 & Office 365.


#5 Rocky Bennett

Rocky Bennett

  • Members
  • 2,755 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Mexico, USA
  • Local time:08:47 PM

Posted 02 March 2017 - 10:34 AM

You will not need any anti-malware protection, Windows 10 is well protected out of the box.


594965_zpsp5exvyzm.png


#6 Allan

Allan

  • BC Advisor
  • 8,614 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Jersey
  • Local time:10:47 PM

Posted 02 March 2017 - 10:49 AM

Whoa - sorry to disagree with the above post, but.... While Windows 10 does indeed offer better protection than previous versions of Windows, and while Windows Defender is certainly more robust than it used to be, I prefer to use dedicated apps for system protection.

 

Here are my anti malware suggestions:

 

1) A good AV that is always resident (I'm a fan of Kaspersky, but there are any number of very good products on the market - both free and paid)

 

2) MalwareBytes should be installed. No reason for the paid version, but be sure to run scans every couple of weeks just to be safe.

 

3) I'm a fan of both SpywareBlaster (passive browsing protection - be sure to manually update every couple of weeks if you use the free version) and WinPatrol.

 

More important than any of these apps, however, is "smart computing". For example, do not click on links in emails unless you are 100% certain they are safe. Ditto links on the web. Do not visit questionable sites on the web. Do not download torrents. Do not let others use your computer - or at the very least do not give them access to the admin account. And most important of all in my opinion, be sure to create regular backups. I cannot recommend good imaging software as your backup solution strongly enough. Having recent, reliable disc images which you can restore if needed is the best possible safeguard against most potential dangers you may encounter.


Edited by Allan, 02 March 2017 - 10:50 AM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users