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Desktop Power Button?


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#1 dukejohn2000

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 10:13 PM

While looking inside on old Dell Desktop, which didn't work because of some HDD issues, but I just put I put a new HDD in it, after like 3 years of not using it. I noticed upon powering it on, it made no Beep or display on the monitor, the fans and HDD started spinning with lights and stuff, but no BIOS Beep and no display. so I decided I'd take a took at some things, and upon deep inspection I noticed the power button has 1 blue wire, going from the tiny button itself. but there are 4 connectors on the bottom of the button, only one of which was being used - by the blue wire. and next to the blue wire there is a medium red wire, that looks similar to the blue wire, and is right next to it - with the same couplers, but it appeared to have been ripped off, I was wondering if this may have something to do with it not booting up, what do you think?


Edited by dukejohn2000, 28 February 2017 - 10:23 PM.


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#2 synergy513

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 12:04 AM

Hello and welcome to Bleeping Computer!!

 

     Ok, most motherboards have a pin header called front panel (fr_pnl)  it is usually forward most and along the edge on the motherboard ..an old dell may be different, but this is kind of a blanket characteristic.  this pin connector controls the front hdd light and other things as well. you may need a magnifying glass to inspect further,  that header should have two pins called PWR with a + and - side. These two pins are what sends the signal to power up.  it only needs two pins, the white one being negative.. this header usually stays intact with the wiring and connector springing forth from the actual power button, unless the whole motherboard was dislodged or something.

 

    this front panel header kind of looks like a usb header, 2 pins thick and 8 or so pins wide.


Edited by synergy513, 01 March 2017 - 12:08 AM.

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#3 ranchhand_

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 07:41 AM

I don't think that is the cause of your problem, but it's easy to check. Trace the one wire back to where it plugs in to the mainboard, as Synergy513 described above. Pull it off revealing the two tiny contacts on the mainboard. Take a flat-bladed screwdriver and cross those two contacts on the mainboard. The computer should power-up and boot into Windows normally, and run normally. If it does not and you still have the same problem, the power switch is not the problem. From that point forward, a series of tests must be run to determine which component has failed.

By the way...if you see that the red wire goes to the mainboard power switch socket I described above, then it should be reconnected to the front panel switch.


Edited by ranchhand_, 01 March 2017 - 10:22 AM.

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#4 dc3

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 11:33 AM

Please post the model of this Dell desktop.

 

If shorting the power header pins doesn't produce any results there is another test you can run which will determine if the PSU is working or not.

 

With the computer off remove the side of the case so you can access the motherboard.  Before touching anything inside the case touch the metal of the case to discharge any static electricity in you system.

 

Disconnect the PSU power cord, either from the receptacle is plugged into or from the rear of the PSU.

 

Remove the PSU 24 pin connector from the motherboard.

 

Take a paper clip or a small gauge wire and use it to make a jumper.  Place one end of the jumper in the green wire socket and the other end in any black wire socket.  Make sure the jumper isn't touching anything other than the two sockets

 

Plug the power cord back in.  The fans should spin up. If they don't then there is a problem with the PSU.  To confirm this you can use a volt meter to determine if there is any output from the PSU.

 

Yellow      +12VDC

Red           +5VDC

Orange   +3.3VDC


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#5 synergy513

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 01:24 PM

Oh yes, the old power up with fans and hdd light, but no display or POST beeps...with a twist, i mean twisted wires, pun intended.

 

ok. as stated abve, the power supply is first. suspect.  a good place to start for me would be to check to see if you can get into BIOS upon first power up, i think it is a f2 key tap tap on an old dell, then i would pull out the cmos battery, the thing liooks like a coin seated in the motherboard somewhere., those are tricky sometimes, then leave it out for a while, like 10 minutes or so and put it back in the way it was, that resets the cmos/bios firmware so at least the that is a clean slate, also, is the main 4 pin motherboard power connection good?

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Edited by synergy513, 01 March 2017 - 01:28 PM.

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#6 dukejohn2000

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 07:55 PM

ok, so after messing with it for about 3 hours, I finally got it to boot up and function correctly, other than having to replace the HDD it works fine. I literally unplugged everything, RAM, Video Card, HDD, even removed the CPU Chip and gently blew it out (had dust under the pins) and blew the entire thing out, including power ports  and couplers, after booting it up without anything plugged in, it shut off. and then I plugged everything back in, and it booted up like new. I had to reinstall Vista again, but other than that it's working great.

 

BTW, It's a Dell Inspiron 519



#7 synergy513

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Posted 02 March 2017 - 12:59 AM

Excellent!


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#8 dc3

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Posted 02 March 2017 - 11:29 AM

If you pulled the CPU and its heatsink assembly you should have cleaned the mating surfaces of the heatsink and CPU and made a new application of the thermal compound.  Since there is no mention of your having done this I would suggest keeping an eye on the CPU temperature.


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#9 dukejohn2000

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Posted 02 March 2017 - 11:52 AM

If you pulled the CPU and its heatsink assembly you should have cleaned the mating surfaces of the heatsink and CPU and made a new application of the thermal compound.  Since there is no mention of your having done this I would suggest keeping an eye on the CPU temperature.

 

You are correct in assuming I did not apply new Thermal Compound, as don't have any on hand. I'll definitely be keeping a close eye on it while I await its arrival.

 

However, I did notice that there was only residual amounts of Thermal Compound on the processor after I pulled it off. Given the tiny amount of residue that was on there I think it's safe to assume that it was removed previously, without the application of new Thermal Compound.



#10 dc3

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Posted 02 March 2017 - 12:21 PM

You only need a drop about the size of a grain of rice.  All this is suppose to do is fill the uneven surface areas of the heatsink and CPU to enhance the thermal convection between the two surfaces.

 

To monitor the CPU temperature you can download CPUID's HWMonitor.


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