Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Win10 - Linux Mint System Image Backup


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 cmptrgy

cmptrgy

  • Members
  • 1,686 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Massachusetts
  • Local time:08:19 AM

Posted 28 February 2017 - 10:56 AM

I just got my Win10 -Linux Mint setup as a dual boot system.

I'd like to know what it takes to do a system image backup.



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 MDD1963

MDD1963

  • Members
  • 699 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:19 PM

Posted 01 March 2017 - 03:08 AM

If you have a Western Digital drive connected anywhere (internal or external), you can use the free version of WD's Acronis True Image.

 

Clonezilla (text/Linux based, no GUI) , EaseUS Todo Backup, and AOMEI Backupper also work very well, with the latter two being about as easy to use as Acronis....


Asus Z270A Prime/7700K/32 GB DDR4-3200/GTX1060


#3 wizardfromoz

wizardfromoz

  • Banned
  • 2,799 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:10:19 PM

Posted 01 March 2017 - 04:15 AM

Relevant suggestions from MDD 1963 above :thumbup2:

 

Just an amendment - Clonezilla is Open Source and cross-platform, can be used either from Windows or from Linux.

 

You may want to take a look at the following, in Forum, one current, and one referred to:

 

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/640857/my-gosh-how-do-i-use-linux-to-back-up-a-drive/

 

and

 

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/594582/backing-up-linux/

 

... also my Tutorial on Aptik in the Tutorials Subsection, or fast-track here

 

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/612761/aptik-move-your-linux-to-a-different-drive-or-computer/

 

... once we get a clearer picture of what you are trying to achieve, we can better advise.

 

Cheers

 

:wizardball: Wizard



#4 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:08:19 AM

Posted 01 March 2017 - 05:41 AM

If you install it on Windows 10, you can also use Macrium Reflect Free Edition, which has one benefit that only paid for offerings has, WinPE bootable media. :thumbup2:

 

I've used it not only for backup (outside of the dual boot Windows/Linux dual boot environment), also have successfully cloned three Linux Mint installs from HDD to SSD or from one SSD to another. And it's simple to use. Here's where you can get Macrium Reflect w/out any 3rd party bundles, while registration is offered, it's optional, not required. The WinPE bootable Media will require about a 35-450MB download from Microsoft, which on an average connection, takes only a few minutes, and won't have to be redone with every upgrade to the software. 

 

http://filehippo.com/download_macrium_reflect/

 

If you try & download from Macrium, you'll be redirected to Download (dot) com, where they're notorious about slipping in 3rd party junkware. The link I provided is clean, and when you create media, can simply create an ISO instead for later burning, or use Rufus to make a bootable USB stick. I've used the brand for years, and unlike Clonezilla, the image will be very compressed to your external drive, not a 1:1 clone, which uses as much drive space as what you're imaging. Restore is also fast, very speedy once it begins to restore Linux Mint. And should you later require a HDD (or upgrade to an SSD), cloning is easier than baking a cake. :)

 

That's my suggestion based on personal experience & positive outcomes with the software for myself & others. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 cmptrgy

cmptrgy
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 1,686 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Massachusetts
  • Local time:08:19 AM

Posted 03 March 2017 - 08:18 PM

I have experience using Macrium Reflect Free including the WinPE bootable media.

I'm just a straight away backup person. When I conduct experiments, investigate something new or install something new, I create system image backups.

I should have said that since I have 2 OS on my computer now, I want to make sure my computer is completely backed up in its entirety but if I have to account for Linux now that it's on my computer, what do I need to know. If I use Macrium Reflect Free and know that it will completely restore my Win10/Linux computer I'll be ok.



#6 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:08:19 AM

Posted 04 March 2017 - 06:30 AM

 

I want to make sure my computer is completely backed up in its entirety but if I have to account for Linux now that it's on my computer, what do I need to know. If I use Macrium Reflect Free and know that it will completely restore my Win10/Linux computer I'll be ok.

 

 

cmptrgy, the only thing you need to know are that you have a couple extra partitions, and that the Windows 10 one is smaller, Macrium knows how to handle this. :)

 

Had I not used it myself first for cloning Linux Mint three consecutive times w/out issue, plus created many & restored one backup, I'd not had recommended the software for your use. :)    Macrium handles Linux partitions differently than some native Linux backup software (example, Clonezilla), it retains the partition structures, yet compacts these only to the amount of data used, this is why these are small. If you notice with backup/restore, Linux does each much faster than Windows, maybe because there's less data on these, anyway, the restores were perfect (3 clones & one backup image restore). Has to be done with the WinPE media, or by adding under 'Other Tasks' while Macrium Reflect is open, add an option to the bootloader. 

 

Though if you didn't perform the latter (the boot entry) before installing Linux Mint, it's too late to add it now, won't install once another OS has taken charge of the bootloader. :(

 

However, the WinPE media is still a great option, just a little slower at loading everything than the bootable environment above. Once the backup begins, won't be slower at all & any speed limitations will only be what type of ports you have to use, hopefully you have USB 3.0 ports & an enclosure, though this works fine with a USB 2.0 enclosure also. 

 

BTW, I just installed Macrium Reflect in a spare PC (Dell Optiplex 740) last night, the components needed to build the WinPE media were over 700MB, went to the restroom and then grabbed a drink, was 60% complete with the download by the time I returned (about 3 minutes). What it's doing, is not installing the complete WinPE pack, what's needed for Macrium Reflect to use, though you stated you were aware of the software, mainly wanted to let you know what size the image was that I needed lat night to proceed, don't know if it was because the PC was non-UEFI (built in 2006), or if it's that large for everyone. As long as you're not capped on data, doesn't matter anyway. :)

 

I do believe that Macrium Reflect will meet your need, however, no software is 100% risk free & that's in the fine print of any. Also recommend that you download & keep a copy of 'boot-repair-disk' ISO (64 bit version) for just in case it becomes needed. There's a 32 bit offering of the software also if needed, this is the one I could find the quickest. Be sure to burn it ASAP to optical media or have it on an external to create a bootable USB stick from another computer for an emergency. 

 

https://sourceforge.net/projects/boot-repair-cd/

 

You may be able to find out more about this on one of the sites on the link, this is an automated tool for when you cannot boot into your Linux install, and can fix many issues. :)

 

BTW, here's the link for both the 32 & 64 bit ISO's as well as documentation, experienced Linux users knows these are great to have on hand at all times. The 64 bit version is the same as above. 

 

https://sourceforge.net/projects/boot-repair-cd/files/

 

EDIT: A Bit more information about the bootable rescue disks........don't want until these are needed to download!

 

https://sourceforge.net/p/boot-repair-cd/home/Home/

 

Good Luck! :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 04 March 2017 - 06:47 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 cmptrgy

cmptrgy
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 1,686 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Massachusetts
  • Local time:08:19 AM

Posted 07 March 2017 - 07:13 PM

Got MRF installed & created a system image backup from Windows.

--- I had to use the 32-bit version because my Win10 OS is 32-bit.

 

On the sourceforce boot repair disks, it appears to me I should be doing them in Linux, not Windows. Is that the case?






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users