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Thinkpad T460 SSD Noise


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#1 idea1

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 03:42 AM

Hi Everyone

      I have bought an Lenovo Thinkpad T460 in November 2016 with following configuration:

RAM - 8 GB

Processor - Intel Core i7 6600U 

SSD - 256 GB, Serial ATA3 OPAL2.0 ‐ Capable

OS - Windows 10

 

This is a configured laptop from default intel i5 to i7 with all other config remaining same.

The issue is I can hear a hissing sound everytime I access the SSD. I mean while opening a file,opening a new tab in chrome or while downloading anything to SSD. My query is why the noise is coming as it's an SSD and has no moving parts. I found out it's of Sandisk make. My thinkpad is on warranty, should I replace it or it's normal ??

 

Thanks in advance



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#2 Platypus

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 04:27 AM

This sort of effect is most commonly one of two things, producing the "sound" of the data stream over the SATA interface, rather than anything audible from the drive itself.

 

The first thing that can pick it up is the sound, as in audio circuitry, of the laptop and can be checked by various procedures like seeing if it's affected by plugging in headphones or temporarily disabling sound in the BIOS if there is a provision to do that.

 

The second possibility is circuitry other than sound stages - e.g. similar to coil whine on a video card. The mainboard can use tiny individual switching regulators to derive supply rails from master voltage, and they can whistle or hiss with the load.

 

The only way to know for certain will be by investigation, but I doubt if it would be classified as a problem for warranty or needing repair.


Edited by Platypus, 24 February 2017 - 04:28 AM.

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#3 idea1

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Posted 25 February 2017 - 03:12 AM

Thanx for the reply.

But the whining and hissing sound comes when any data is being written to SSD. I tried by muting audio, still it comes. If I download a big file which takes time, then a continuous sound comes which could be easily noticed in a quite room.



#4 Platypus

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Posted 25 February 2017 - 05:16 AM

But the whining and hissing sound comes when any data is being written to SSD.


That's why I said it is commonly caused by the data stream over the SATA interface.

Muting audio doesn't turn off the audio circuitry that can be picking it up, it just tells it not to pass on the sound from Windows.

Unfortunately nobody on an internet forum can hear where the sound is coming from on your computer, you have to be physically present to investigate that. If you're wanting to diagnose it yourself, by a process of elimination, you'll need to work out where the sound is actually coming from.

You could use a piece of plastic tubing to listen to the SSD itself and around the casing and speakers to locate the source. But either turning the audio off in the BIOS if such an option exists, or plugging in headphones, which does switch the speakers off in most designs, is one way to quickly find out if it's being picked up in the analog audio stages.
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