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I'm ready to complete my Win10-Linux Mint dual boot project


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#1 cmptrgy

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 11:27 PM

This is a follow up from "I am interested in upgrading my son’s Vista laptop to an appropriate Linux OS"

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/629150/i-am-interested-in-upgrading-my-sons-vista-laptop-to-an-appropriate-linux-os/

Please note, this project is for dual booting with my Windows 10 desktop; not the Vista laptop any more.

 

I am still using the information from that post and I need to know how to set my HDD partitions.

I plan on using 20GiB for root, 1024MiB for Swap, and the rest for /home guidelines per cat1092’s recommendations in post #55.

“Maybe 20GiB for root or ''/', 1024Mib for Swap area, and the rest of the drive for /home, root & /home should be formatted as ext4 (make sure the Format box is checked), this is easily done through the install process, no partition tools needs to be used, you can delete the Vista partitions & create new ones for Linux Mint all though the natural install procedure. 

The reason why I say only 20GiB for root, is that normally once installed, root doesn't use a lot of space (usually less than 10GiB), whereas /home does. You'll see a Home folder upon install, yet there's a lot more files than that shows in the background, configuration files for many apps, and more.”

I’ve seen ext formatting discussed in some research, but I do not see how to do so on my system.

 

I have been trying to install Linux Mint 8.1 Sarah and I wish to have Windows 10 be the primary boot.

--- The first time I tried it I selected install Linux Mint alongside Windows 10

--- I don’t recall what I didn’t like about it but I quit the installation process

With some research, it appeared selecting something else is the way to go.

 

Here is a snapshot of my HDD partitions and how I think it should end up.

Attached File  Win10 - Linux Mint HDD partitioning.PNG   65.06KB   1 downloads

 

 

Here is the installation type that shows up during my installation process and this is what I need to know how to correct properly.

--- BTW, I have not completed the installation: I quit the installation and want to get back on the doing the setup the right way.

Attached File  Win10 - Linux Mint installation type that I need to correct.PNG   15.07KB   1 downloads



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#2 wizardfromoz

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 12:26 AM

Who's going first? Brian, Punk? I haven't used Windows 10, only as late as 8.1.

 

But cmptrgy (as well as good to see you back, lol)

 

 

I’ve seen ext formatting discussed in some research, but I do not see how to do so on my system.

 

Your install will default to setting the Linux partition/s as Ext4, it is what Linux uses. That will not affect Windows' NTFS.

 

Cheers all

 

:wizardball: Wizard



#3 MadmanRB

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 03:02 AM

Indeed when you partition your drive in gparted you will need to assign the needed partitions.

That is your 20GB for root 120GB for home and your swap.

EXT4 is the file system linux typically uses these days and it will be a entirely different format yo what windows uses but will have no effect on windows as linux and windows can coexist peacefully in the right situation.

What you do in windows wont effect linux and vice versa, the only exception is of course file moving and the like.

Linux can read NTFS and even write to it

Windows cxant do that with linux but thats because windows is stupid :D


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#4 Al1000

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 03:54 AM

Before advising what partitions to create, you need to confirm whether you have an MSDOS or GPT partition table on this drive..
 
How to check partition table type using GParted

I’ve seen ext formatting discussed in some research, but I do not see how to do so on my system.


You select this when you come to install the system, but lets get the partitions sorted first.

Edited by Al1000, 24 February 2017 - 03:58 AM.


#5 Al1000

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 03:59 AM

Your install will default to setting the Linux partition/s as Ext4, it is what Linux uses. That will not affect Windows' NTFS.


There is no default setting when using the "something else" option.

----------------------------------------

We are now at post #5, and nothing has yet been accomplished.

Let's please wait for the OP to respond before adding more unnecessary posts to the topic.

Edited by Al1000, 24 February 2017 - 05:59 AM.


#6 NickAu

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 05:15 AM

Hi

 

May i jump in?

 

How To Install Ubuntu Linux Alongside Windows 10 (Standard BIOS, non-UEFI)

Just follow that guide and you will be OK,

 

UEFI mode

How To Install Linux Mint 18 Alongside Windows 10 (UEFI)

 If you need help resetting boot order using efimngr and grub I will guide you thru it.

 

Nick

 

.


Edited by NickAu, 24 February 2017 - 05:48 AM.

Arch Linux .
 
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#7 bumping

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 02:15 PM

what Nick just posted ... is pretty good.step by step for using the Mint installer.

 

there are several steps, but not complicated

 

if you can't have the How To open at the same time, print it out

 

 

 

maybe pinning it would be good?

as partitioning via Mint installer, is a bit vague for someone that hasn't used it before.



#8 cmptrgy

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Posted 25 February 2017 - 02:15 AM

More information on my Windows 10 computer: it was originally Windows 7 Pro and I upgraded to Windows 10 Pro. System Information reports BIOS Mode: Legacy.

The SSD volumes tab reports Partition style: Master Boot Record (MBR)

​--- The thumbnail is at the bottom of this post. I wanted it here but that's where it ended up

 

I believe it’s best to return to a couple of comments I mentioned in my first post:

 

This relates to my 1st attempt when and I I selected install Linux Mint alongside Windows 10 and was probably on the right track and should have posted my concerns at that time.

“I have been trying to install Linux Mint 8.1 Sarah and I wish to have Windows 10 be the primary boot.

--- The first time I tried it I selected install Linux Mint alongside Windows 10

--- I don’t recall what I didn’t like about it but I quit the installation process

With some research, it appeared selecting something else is the way to go.”

So now I’d like to explain what I didn’t like about it.

 

First of all, I did complete the installation this time and default partitions were recorded and reached the point of where I could have continued to upgrade whatever it wanted to do.

But my disk management still showed the unallocated partition. I expected to see whatever Linux default partitions to appear in there. That was my biggest concern as I didn’t trust whether or not I was on the right track.

--- Were the Linux default partitions supposed to be there or is it normal for the unallocated partition to still show up that way?

Attached File  Drive C shrink - unallocated.PNG   9.96KB   0 downloads

 

During the install Downloading language packs was part of the process.

--- Is that normal? I don’t want extra installs if I don’t need them.

--- If I recall correctly, I had selected English at whatever step I was asked for my language.

Then at bootup, the default was for Linux and I had to arrow down to Windows 10

--- I want Windows 10 as my default boot: is that possible?

It might sound foolish but since I wasn’t sure whether or not I was on the right track, I quit the process. Since I had created a system image backup before starting, I did go back.

With all of that said, it appears to me I should go back to that process and if it completes properly which I suspect it will, then address what needs to be accounted for.

 

This one relates to my second attempt:

This is what I found to help me with a step by step process and it recommended “something else”

Guide to Install Linux Mint Alongside Windows

--- How to dual boot Linux Mint with Windows with legacy BIOS system.

https://itsfoss.com/guide-install-linux-mint-16-dual-boot-windows/

This is the installation I didn’t complete as I couldn’t figure out how manually set up the partitions.

Unless this process is worth it, I’d prefer to do the first process instead.

Attached Files


Edited by cmptrgy, 25 February 2017 - 02:32 AM.


#9 Al1000

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Posted 25 February 2017 - 02:35 AM

In the list in the installer where you select "install alongside Windows" and "something else" etc, do you see an option that says something like "install Mint in unallocated space"?

To answer your questions:

Were the Linux default partitions supposed to be there or is it normal for the unallocated partition to still show up that way?


I would have expected to see the Linux partitions there.
 

Is that normal? I don’t want extra installs if I don’t need them.


Yes that's normal.
 

I want Windows 10 as my default boot: is that possible?


Yes, this can be easily changed after installation.

Set Grub to boot your chosen operating system by default

Edited by Al1000, 25 February 2017 - 02:53 AM.


#10 cmptrgy

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Posted 25 February 2017 - 04:04 AM

I'll look for installing Mint in unallocated space. I need to wait until later today to get this going and I will post back on results or hangups.



#11 cmptrgy

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 10:22 PM

Linux Mint 18.1 Serena MATE 64-bit installed and I’ve been using it all day.

--- I am holding back on claiming successfully since I need comments for some issues I’m noting below.

If everything looks like I’m on track ok, I can move on and post questions in future threads.

 

I used How to install Ubuntu Linux alongside Windows 10 (Standard BIOS, non-UEFI).

--- That article is much clearer than the article I had been using.

http://www.everydaylinuxuser.com/2015/11/how-to-install-ubuntu-linux-alongside_8.html

 

To answer for installing Mint in unallocated space:

In the write the changes to disks dialog box, it does state:

If you continue, the changes listed below will be written to the disks. Otherwise you will be able to make further changes manually. On my computer, the entries are

--- The partition tables of the following devices are changed: SCS13 (0,0,0) (sda)

The following partitions are going to be formatted:

--- partition #4 of SCS13 (0,0,0) (sda) as ext14

--- partition #5 of SCS13 (0,0,0) (sda) as swap

Is it possible to see that partitioning in Linux?

 

When I was asked to choose an update policy, I “dotted don’t break my computer” instead of (dot) optimize stability and security.

--- I also installed all recommended updates.

I entered sudo ufw enable into the terminal and it reported firewall is active and enabled

--- It was good to know ahead of time that I wouldn’t see any movement

I downloaded ClamAV package for Internet security.

 

For the Install Ubuntu alongside Windows 10 process, it states:

Documents, music and other personal files will be kept. You can choose which operating system you want each time the computer starts up

--- I was tempted not to select that option but I did.

--- I wasn’t planning on including all of my documents in Windows to be included in Linux.

--- In Linux, if I go and delete whatever documents I don’t want in Linux, would that be a problem?

 

Now for a couple more issues

First issue

Disk management unallocated space for preparing for Linux. This part is not an issue.

Attached File  Drive C shrink - unallocated.PNG   9.96KB   0 downloads

 

 But is this an issue? That unallocated space is taken up with 2 Healthy Primary Partitions without reporting them as Linux partitions.

--- I imagine the additional 109.36 GB partition hold the Linux partitions

 What is the purpose of the 3.90 GB Linux partition?

Attached File  Disk Mangement after Linux Install.PNG   14.84KB   0 downloads

 

Second issue

In Linux, 9:12 PM is recorded as 21:12. Can I change it to 9:12 PM?


Edited by cmptrgy, 27 February 2017 - 01:58 PM.


#12 wizardfromoz

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 12:05 AM

Hi cmptrgy, thought someone would have been along by now, sorry.

 

My comments highlighted between yours - sounds like you are well and truly on the road :guitar:

 

 

 


Is it possible to see that partitioning in Linux?

 

In Serena MATE, you can look at:

 

Menu - Applications - Accessories - Disks and get some idea, doesn't show used space. Also

 

Menu - Applications - System Tools - Disk Usage Analyser will shed some light

 

Most comprehensive is provided by GParted - the GNOME Partition Editor. You can install that through the same avenue as you installed Clam, which I am guessing was through Software Manager. Once installed, it will be under

 

Menu - Applications - Administration - GParted

 


 

--- I wasn’t planning on including all of my documents in Windows to be included in Linux.

 

... and they won't be. You can see them from Linux, you can work on some of them from Linux, you can drag and drop a copy of them into Linux, &c.

 

--- In Linux, if I go and delete whatever documents I don’t want in Linux, would that be a problem?

 

What sort of documents (simple answer is no)?

 


But is this an issue? That unallocated space is taken up with 2 Healthy Primary Partitions without reporting them as Linux partitions.

 

It is a case of "peek-a-boo", Windows can't see Linux but we can see Windows

 

 

--- I imagine the additional 109.36 GB partition hold the Linux partitions

 

You would imagine correctly. Only about 6 to 6.5 GB of that is used currently (plus Clam's install)

 

 What is the purpose of the 3.90 GB Linux partition?

 

It is likely Swap - Swap is like Windows' pagefile, it provides for additional resources should your RAM memory be struggling

 

Second issue

In Linux, 9:12 PM is recorded as 21:12. Can I change it to 9:12 PM?

 

You will likely have a small display bottom right corner of your desktop showing date and time. Right-click and choose Preferences

 

 

Cheers

 

:wizardball: Wizard

 

Edited typo


Edited by wizardfromoz, 27 February 2017 - 12:06 AM.


#13 cmptrgy

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 12:26 AM

Thanks Wizard: nice easy answers. I'll follow up on them tomorrow.



#14 wizardfromoz

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 02:57 AM

Always welcome, hope all goes well :thumbup2:

 

:wizardball: Wizard



#15 cmptrgy

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 11:29 AM

Thanks everyone for your help along the way. I'll be posting issues and questions in future threads from now on.

I have read many times how some newbies give up and I know in my case, even though it took me forever to get to where I am, I never gave up even when I was tempted to. But I have to give you guys credit for keeping me going to. Have a great day.






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