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Can I replace CPU cooler without removing mobo from case


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#1 reversenotation

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 04:33 PM

My old CPU cooler/heatsink has come loose and I was thinking of replacing it with a cooler master hyper 103 cpu cooler.  I have an intel socket 1155, core i5 processor, an MSI P67a-gd53 mobo within an Antec 900 case.  It has been a while since I have done much system building so I was wondering whether it is possible to install a new cooler without removing the motherboard from the case.  I think you have to secure the cooler from the reverse side to the motherboard, but if it was sensible I would like to not have to remove the mobo from the case.

 

Many thanks!


Edited by hamluis, 22 February 2017 - 04:43 PM.
Moved from System Building to Internal Hardware - Hamluis.


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#2 hamluis

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 04:42 PM

Take a look at the instructions for installing the cooler...and you will have your answer.

 

https://www.hardwarebbq.com/cooler-master-hyper-103-cpu-air-cooler-review/2/

 

Louis



#3 reversenotation

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 04:48 PM

Thanks Louis so it is secured by backplates.  I suppose all coolers are going to be the same.  I'll have to remove the mobo from the case then

 

Thanks again



#4 Drillingmachine

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 05:04 PM

Newer Antec 900 models have cutout for CPU cooler on motherboard tray.

#5 Zone_86

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 07:02 PM

Alternatively, if you happen to have one of the older Antec 900 cases without that cutout a Coolernster TX3 has push pins just like the stock Intel fan. Here is a vid on that one.



#6 cat1092

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 10:08 PM

Personally, I'd never trust push pins to secure a heavy heatsink/fan combo, unless it's in one of the type of cases where the motherboard is laying flat, not vertical. It's perfectly OK to use lightweight Intel/AMD coolers this way, though not even the most lightweight aftermarket cooler if in a tower case where the MB is vertically installed. 

 

Considering the price of premium hardware, or mid-grade to budget (to some may be all one can afford), it's well worth the couple of hours of work to do things right the first time. :)

 

YouTube shortcuts to major jobs aren't always the best of ideas, on the other hand, have learned a lot from these videos where things were properly performed. Enter 'How to Build a PC' in the search box & most can tell the difference between the good & bad ones. The body language, tone of voice, too many 'cutouts' of important details, all are signs of not good instruction. Look at the ratings for a video, that can also tell a lot, as well as in the Comments.

 

Because of that cooler falls, chances are, it's taking a chunk of the motherboard with it, and may damage the CPU (& GPU) also, not worth the time to save 2 hours of labor over, especially if the owner self-built the PC. That person has more appreciation of their work & won't chance shortcutting for the perceived convenience that any YouTube video may display. :)

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 22 February 2017 - 10:10 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 Zone_86

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 12:43 AM

I agree with the above, with the exception of that particular fan because i have inatalled upwards of 50-55 of them and not a single issue. It's my go-to 4790k, 6700k, 7700k fan for stock-nominal operations and it does a good job. It's because the fan is actually 92MM, with the heatsink being lighter, smaller, shorter than a traditional large-heavy120mm fan and heatsink like a Hyper 212 (which doesn't use push pins) or a Deepcool Gammaxx 400 120mm which does use push pins.



#8 jonuk76

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 02:57 AM

The Arctic Freezer 13 (and others like the Freezer 7 Pro rev 2) are mid sized tower coolers that use modified push pins rather than a backplate.  They aren't massively heavy coolers, and I've used them myself and they seem strong enough. 


7sbvuf-6.png


#9 cat1092

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 03:15 AM

Some of what I've stated above is because have seen the heatsinks of those included Intel fans popping out, not work of my doing, rather of the OEM. 

 

Often, there would be a sudden rise in heat, usually during gaming/benchmarking & subsequent BSOD, and even though in warranty, wanted me to 'take a peek' because if a simple fix, that would save from having to ship their PC & be w/out 2-4 weeks. On three of these PC's, all custom builds by a major independent OEM (am not calling name to prevent litigation), one of those locking tabs would be popped up & only one of the three stripes of Intel thermal paste would be 'cured' (the others looked almost new) so I'd remove the heatsink, cleanup that component & CPU with air & 91% alcohol, then place to the side. Then apply some MX-4 on the CPU (what I used then, now use Arctic Silver 5, aka 'AC5'), very sparingly, just oat sized amount, then spread with a plastic tool I have that's cleaned after every use to where it would simply glaze the CPU (anymore is too much & a waste). Any excess that would run past the CPU would be removed before lowering the heatsink. In practice, I've found GPU's to have 'too much' paste over CPU's, at times, it's all around the surrounding area & a mess, yet the die is a tiny fraction of the size of any CPU, so only a 'dot' is needed. :)

 

Reassembled using those old style optical drive screws, the ones that stuck out some above the threads to hold in the old type (spring loaded) optical drive latches, and my own like Intel coolers with copper core (two didn't have these) that I keep on hand (this trick was also learned on YouTube). The 'donation' for the jobs were only $50 ($60 for the copper core upgrades), I stand behind what I do for a solid year, a handshake agreement, and I'm well known around here, mostly via my former volunteer work with a charity agency which rehomed donated & collected by the streets computers of all types (except Macs). We did get a few, the ministry had a helper who knew these & would be listed on eBay (how I came to know that site :)) & proceeds would go back into general funds. 

 

In fact, have built close to 25 PC's in the last 6-8 months alone, on average, the components were over $1,400, some higher, and so that the customer has a 100% OEM warranty on their components, they order & have delivered to their residence & if needed, I'll pick up everything & deliver the final build. This way, I have nothing involved except labor & there's no 'under the table' markup on parts (so everyone wins! :)). I can build a powerful quad core PC that the same OEM who shipped the botched installed CPU coolers, charges $3,200 for a total of $1,800 (including a generous donation for my labor), and this includes a 512GB Samsung 950 PRO (now 960 PRO) NVMe SSD that they don't. I don't do $500 builds, $1,000 is the absolute minimum, and this holds down the calls for 'cheap builds', can perform only so much work with my condition & must make these count. 

 

Add to the factor that lower priced builds equates lower quality components = more 'redo' work caused by low cost hardware. I'm not going down that road, my last 'cheap' build was a rebuild of a PC given to me that no longer retains any of the components, as of early this week the mini tower case was upgraded & that was the final component. I'll likely take the original as sent to me, reassemble & use as a low cost, low maintenance Linux folding@home box. :)

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 23 February 2017 - 03:18 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 Zone_86

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 04:03 AM

Sounds like we are much the same Cat I have been building since 1998, some with a few gaming OEM's and a lot my own business.



#11 cat1092

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 05:43 AM

Zone_86, you (& jonuk76) have far more experience than I, didn't even own a computer until the year 2000, and this was only because it was needed for work. To save money, BYOD was corporate policy with most employees, though had to keep a separate partition for work related matters that could be audited at any time. :)

 

My hardware journey didn't begin until 2007, and that was out of necessity, didn't have the funds to repair my notebook, so at the suggestion of a neighbor, on recycle day, went & checked bins & returned home with two like new notebooks similar to mine (with XP SP2 reinstall CD's & another for drivers/utilities). One was truly broken (MB), yet the HDD was fine & much larger than mine & the newer screen fit perfect, that's how it all began. Then became a hobby, so volunteered at the charity I spoke of above, where I learned a lot from some retired IT Pros. We'd take as many of the 'scrap' PC's as possible & fish out enough components to build a few extra, and used the appropriate reinstall CD that matched the OEM, removing the old COA & replacing with the one the MB came out of. :)

 

Building computers is very similar to my old hobby before becoming disabled, working on vehicles (mostly 70's models). Mostly assembly, followed by the OS install & drivers. Nowadays, I do things the proper way, upon delivery, I allow the person to boot the computer after a forced shutdown once Windows is loaded (I also do Linux builds), they do the choosing of their username/password, agree to the EULA & after boot, I finish the driver install. ASRock has a cool utility that places these on a USB stick from the UEFI, so I don't need Windows to grab these, only be connected to Internet by Ethernet. I also make sure that Windows Update is doing it's thing before leaving. :)

 

About those cooling solutions with pushpins, I'd at least try & see if one of those long optical drive screws would go in while holding the base next to it to ensure they go in far enough. If so, would snip those push pins off & secure with screws instead (only on one of my own PC's first). I've yet to have a CPU cooler come back to me installed in this manner, in fact, very rarely (it's been 2-3 years), since any work I've done was brought back & the reason wasn't my fault (infected OS). Though I did use some tools found on this forum to cleanse the infections, and didn't charge a red cent for it, though told the owner should it happen again, I'd charge for the service. Though a lesson was learned from that, I now inform folks that I don't guarantee the OS from infections, only if there's driver issues, and will always be sure to disable Windows settings to auto download drivers, there's a OEM link for that in the Start Menu. 

 

I'm still learning, and don't rush myself for anyone to sacrifice quality, my name is on the line & have a loaner notebook w/out my personal data inside if needed. 

 

Hopefully the OP will decide what is best for the system soon. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 jonuk76

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 06:54 AM

Differing opinions are allowed :) We all have different experiences after all. Can't say I've ever built PC's as a proper business, but have put together quite a few since 1998 or so.

Anyway, The Arctic retention mechanism is different from the stock Intel one. The two part push pins go into a fibreglass reinforced plastic frame, which is secured tightly to the motherboard. The heat sink then screws into the frame. I believe this results in less bending of the motherboard than the stock setup.

I've had a Freezer 7 Pro R2 on one of my PC's (an old Core i5 750) for about 4 years now and it's vertically mounted, no problems at all. Would I trust a 1 kg monster cooler to such a setup? No way... But not worried about a relatively light cooler.

7sbvuf-6.png


#13 hamluis

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 10:21 AM

I believe the questions posed in the initial post....have been answered to the OP's satisfaction.  If you have any points which address that initial post and which are clarifications which the OP should know about the named cooler...then I suggest that we stay on topic or initiate a topic of your own where we all can debate this and that about computers.

 

Louis



#14 reversenotation

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 03:39 PM

Many thanks to all that have responded!   I will go with either the Arctic Freezer 13 or the Freezer 7 Pro rev 2, because  a) I have used Arctic Freezer twice before and B) yes I would really like to not have to remove the mobo.  

 

It's possible that there may be some mobo damage with the last one falling off, there is nothing visible but only time will tell.

 

I used to like the idea of overclocking hence a big old cooler but nowadays this isn't so important to me.

 

Anyway I will soon be getting my hands on a mac pro desktop (early 2008 model) G5 style case.  I will enjoy tinkering with that!

 

Thanks!



#15 hamluis

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 06:33 PM

Happy computing :).

 

Louis






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