Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Clonezilla hard drive clone - Target HDD not booting


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 anouri

anouri

  • Members
  • 3 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 22 February 2017 - 02:22 PM

I am tasked to clone an IDE HDD from an industrial computer. The HDD has on it a Windows 2000 and MS-DOS partition. I want to clone the entire disk to another IDE disk of identical size.

 

The original HDD presents a boot menu prompting for which operation system to use, Win 2000 or MS-DOS.

I removed the source HDD in question from the computer and ran Disk Part => Clean on the target HDD. I have the two hard drives connected via a IDE-USB adapter to a workstation computer via USB.

 

I decided to use a Clonezilla live USB to clone the source HDD to target. I want a bit-for-bit clone of the source because I don’t want to mess around with bootloaders and whatnot for the two old OSes (Win 2000 and MS-DOS). I was under the impression that Clonezilla did this but I could be wrong, because I ran the disk-to-disk clone in easy mode, went through the clone successfully and was not able to boot the newly cloned HDD in the source computer. Upon attempting to boot the target HDD in the source computer as if it were the source HDD, I get a “could not find boot partition.”

 

Granted, Clonezilla did prompt to copy over the MBR of source HDD and I did so, but I was hoping that this would be a clean bit-for-bit clone, kind of like how a scanner scans a paper.

 

What am I doing wrong here? How can I get a clean bit-for-bit clone? Thank you.


Edited by hamluis, 22 February 2017 - 03:19 PM.
Moved from Internal Hardware to Disk Mgmt Software - Hamluis.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 DataMedic

DataMedic

    Authorized DataMedic Rep


  • Members
  • 89 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Providence, RI
  • Local time:04:21 PM

Posted 22 February 2017 - 02:27 PM

Well, without copying over the MBR your target drive has no partition table.  So the machine can't understand what to do with it.

 

Instead of using Clonezilla, I'd just use a Linux live disk such as Knoppix and use ddrescue.  That'll always get you an exact clone.  The syntax is very simple: ddrescue (source) (destination) (log)

 

And you'll need to use the -f trigger since you're copying to an actual drive not a file.  So your command to copy will be something like this:

 

> ddrescue -f /dev/sda /dev/sdb /some folder/log.log

 

Just be sure to double, or triple, check which drive is which using hwinfo, lshw, gparted, or something else that can list out the drives connected.  Don't want to clone the wrong way.


Edited by DataMedic, 22 February 2017 - 02:29 PM.


#3 anouri

anouri
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 3 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 22 February 2017 - 02:29 PM

Well, without copying over the MBR your target drive has no partition table.  So the machine can't understand what to do with it.

 

Instead of using Clonezilla, I'd just use a Linux live disk and use ddrescue.  That'll always get you an exact clone.  The syntax is very simple: ddrescue (source) (destination) (log)

 

And you'll need to use the -f trigger since you're copying to an actual drive not a file.  So your command to copy will be something like this:

 

> ddrescue -f /dev/sda /dev/sdb /some folder/log.log

Thanks for the quick response. Curious, why use Linux live disk over Clonezilla? Doesn't Clonezilla use the same Linux commands? Thanks.



#4 DataMedic

DataMedic

    Authorized DataMedic Rep


  • Members
  • 89 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Providence, RI
  • Local time:04:21 PM

Posted 22 February 2017 - 02:34 PM

I don't know, I've used Clonezilla exactly once in the last 5 years.  I find it a bit confusing, and clunky.  I'm sure Clonezilla can do a full sector clone, but I'm not accustomed to using it enough to walk you through that.

 

Usually I'm cloning drives on hardware specifically designed for that purpose.



#5 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 23,220 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:21 PM

Posted 22 February 2017 - 03:05 PM

Clonezilla can only do sector by sector using disk to image. It's not available when doing disk to disk. You would need to use the expert options on disk to image and then restore the image back to the target using image to disk.

 

ftp://ftp.itb.ac.id/pub/Clonezilla/clonezilla_live_doc/QuickReference_Card_0.9.5/ClonezillaLiveRefCard_EN_flat_0.9.5.pdf

 

Using the dd command is one way to do it as DataMedic posted. Just make sure you are imputing the correct devices in the correct order or you could be imaging the target to the source and you wouldn't want that. 

 

Another option is to do it within windows using Aomei Partition Assistant which is available for commercial use. This would allow you do to a sector by sector copy to the target disk. I would delete the existing partitions on your target disk first before the copy. All steps in Aomei are virtual and do not complete until Apply is clicked. This lets you back out of any mistakes.

 

http://www.disk-partition.com/copy-disk-partition-wizard.html



#6 DataMedic

DataMedic

    Authorized DataMedic Rep


  • Members
  • 89 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Providence, RI
  • Local time:04:21 PM

Posted 22 February 2017 - 03:30 PM

Another easy option I've often used from within Windows is to just use a demo of some data recovery software such as R-Studio.  Even the demo version will allow you to clone a drive or partition to another drive or partition.  Just use the "copy object to" feature when you right click on the source drive.  You may have to check "enable write" in the settings first or it'll be grayed out.

 

The only downside of cloning in Windows is that the OS doesn't handle bad sectors well.  If there are no bad sectors it's a moot point, but you'd be surprised how often a drive may have bad sectors that have been latent for a long time.  Ddrescue in Linux is much better at handling the bad sectors and has algorithms to skip around them while extracting as much data as possible.


Edited by DataMedic, 22 February 2017 - 03:34 PM.


#7 RolandJS

RolandJS

  • Members
  • 4,512 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Austin TX metro area
  • Local time:03:21 PM

Posted 02 March 2017 - 12:29 PM

Because it was mentioned twice to be careful which HD is set up as the source and which HD is set up as the target -- I recommend giving each HD and each partition a unique name; thus cutting down on accidental cloning the wrong way.


Edited by RolandJS, 02 March 2017 - 12:30 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users