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Vista Booting Issue BSOD


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#1 RocknRollTim

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 05:58 PM

Hi all,

I was wondering whether you could help, basically I have a 4TB SSHD installed which I have formatted as GPT and have allocated the following Windows OSs to the following partitions in ascending order: Windows Vista Ultimate SP1 x64 (Partition 3), Windows 7 Ultimate x64 (Partition 4), Windows 7 Professional SP1 x64 (Partition 5), Windows 8 Pro x64 (Partition 6), Windows 8.1 Pro x64 (Partition 7) and Windows 10 Pro x64 (Partition 8). When installing Vista using the partition wizard, I created each partition with 120GB of space apart from Partition 8 which I allocated 1.5TB, Partition 1 (System Reserved) and Partition 2 (ESR) were automatically created when creating a partition for Vista, the remainder of disk space I have left as unallocated for the future just in case I want to create new or expand existing partitions. However the problem I have got when booting into Vista, it comes up with a BSOD error code *** STOP: 0x0000001E (0xFFFFFFFFC0000005,0xFFFFF80003ACC7,0x0000000000000000,0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF) that I cannot fix even after reinstalling the OS which was now changed the bootloader from Windows 10 to Windows Vista but Windows 10 is the default OS that the PC boots to. Is there anyway to rectify this issue? Your help would be much appreciated.

Kind regards,

RocknRollTim



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#2 RocknRollTim

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Posted 19 February 2017 - 12:41 PM

Update

Also temporarily removed the boot entries for Windows 10, 8.1 and 8 using EasyBCD which didn't work and would have expected to work.

 

P.S. I found this link https://neosmart.net/wiki/repair-dual-boot-configuration/#Repair_Windows_Vista_on_a_dual-boot_system whilst I was on the Internet which unfortunately is for MBR, however the other thing I have noticed when logging in to each Windows OS is that the drive letters in Windows Explorer change slightly each time, this should have nothing to do with it surely?


Edited by RocknRollTim, 19 February 2017 - 01:29 PM.


#3 RocknRollTim

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 01:36 PM

Update

Installed Ubuntu using some of the instructions from the following link http://askubuntu.com/questions/34326.../343352#343352, used 32000MB for swap area and 120000MB for Ubuntu primary partition but according to the link I should have chosen logical for the Ubuntu primary partition but may have misinterpreted the instructions though. However the problem I have got now is that the PC boots to the GRUB2 menu instead of the Windows Boot Manager and have to go through the GRUB2 menu, not sure whether I selected the EFI version of GRUB2 though as I selected Ext4 journaling file system for the setup of the Ubuntu primary partition plus Vista still comes up with the same BSOD as before when using the Windows Boot Manager i.e. now the classic bootloader instead of the Metro bootloader. With regards to drive letters in Windows Explorer as long as the drive letter is C or something else for each version of Windows you boot into then that's fine. 



#4 RocknRollTim

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 12:46 PM

Update

Started over again, using Vista on partition 3 with 120000MB of space and following instructions using http://askubuntu.com/questions/653101/boot-repair-windows-not-listed.



#5 RocknRollTim

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 01:11 PM

Update

I have concluded that this experiment is currently not possible on a GPT volume with Windows Vista and can only be either achieved using one or more MBR/GPT volumes or by using virtual emulators. If anyone can find a way round this problem please feel free to post your resolutions in this thread.



#6 RocknRollTim

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 08:50 AM

Update

 

I went down the path of EasyBCD for a few months and wasn't able to rectify my issue, I figure its because my PC drivers aren't officially supported by Windows Vista hence why I was experiencing unpredictable behaviour with Windows Vista alongside Windows 8 and above plus not to mention why I wasn't able to get any drivers to work with Windows Vista when operating independently without any incompatible OSs alongside such as Windows 8 and above. I therefore conclude that my experiment I was wanting to achieve cannot be carried out successfully without getting a PC that supports EFI or UEFI from the years 2005 or 2006, that's if I can find one of course, if not, looks like I will have to result to a hypervisor to run the OSs I want to experiment with but saying that this method doesn't give a sense of realism when it comes to testing incompatibility of drivers. The PC I was testing with was a Dell Vostro 470.



#7 p_mishra

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 10:45 PM

As you have mentioned, the error is Blue Screen of Death and it must be immediately resolved. The fist and foremost thing to be checked is the disk partition. Many times a good number of partitions also causes the same error and we take it in a highly complicated manner. Instead, you are requested to download and install the updates and the drivers of t he system from Windows update, then scan the system for malware and other potential threats followed by resolving hard disk errors, if any. 

 

To make the things easier for you, I have foud a useful link of Microsoft: https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_vista-update/vista-blue-screen-of-death-on-startup/a08d2a3e-ad5c-42b7-9a46-7bbe5783120f

 

I believe it will really help you.



#8 RocknRollTim

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 02:47 PM

Hi p_mishra.

 

Thank you for responding to my forum thread, I'm definitely certain I have been down this avenue several times before and convinced the PC isn't capable of running Vista alongside Windows 8 and higher, shame I haven't got an older PC that supports Vista using EFI or UEFI to retry this setup on as it would have given a comparison, I guess I will have to keep on perceiving. Thank you for your help.

 

Regards,

 

RocknRollTim  






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