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#1 Joaurora

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Posted 01 September 2006 - 08:51 PM

I am using Windows XP Home edition and do not have a network. How can I boot to my desktop without having to click on my name as administrator when I am the only one using the computer? When I go to User Accounts in Control Panel it gives me the choice of clicking on my name or having to write it in.
Thank you. Joaurora

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#2 buddy215

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Posted 01 September 2006 - 09:05 PM

http://www.annoyances.org/exec/show/article04-103

check the above site for your answer.
“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#3 Enthusiast

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 02:27 AM

The chance to write it in allows you to access the default Windows built in administrator account.

If you do not want to be shown That choice and boot directly in your admin authority account disable fast switching and set no password.

Be aware that surfing the internet should not be dine with an account that has adnministrator priveledges as any malware you let in will have the administrator rights of that account to infect your computer and make systemwide changes.

(The default Administrator account in XP Home

For Windows XP Home Edition
The default administrator account in Windows XP Home Edition can only be accessed from safe mode.
To log on as the Administrator
1. Click Start, click Turn Off Computer, and then click Restart.
2. Once your system begins to restart, press the F8 key to bring up the options menu.
3. Use the arrow keys to highlight the Safe Mode option, and then press ENTER.
4. When the "Windows Welcome" screen appears, click Administrator to log on.
To add an administrator password, which helps make your computer more secure, click Start, click Control Panel, double-click User Accounts, and then click Change an Account. Under "Pick an account to change," click Administrator, and then click Create a password.
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/s.../configure.mspx

Why you need a limited account for use while on the internet:

You should actually have two accounts even if you are the only one using the computer -

One account with administrator rights, and one limited user account.

An account with administrator rights should never be used for surfing the internet as any malware that may be accidentally or inadvertently downloaded while using an account with administrator rights will then have the unlimited rights of that account to infect your computer.

If an attacker hijacks a browser by exploiting an unpatched bug, he also hijacks that user's rights. Because the user can install software, so can the hacker. Result? The attacker "owns" the PC and can drop in his Trojans and worms and rootkits and spyware.

Gaining administrator rights enables malware to change settings, run all programs, install or infect all software and access all data including passwords and financial records.

Setting up and using limited user accounts in Windows XP will keep some spyware at bay because XP's limited user accounts do not have permission to
install new software or do anything else that a limited account cannot do.


Why you should not run your computer as an administrator
Running Windows 2000 or Windows XP as an administrator makes the system vulnerable to Trojan horses and other security risks. The simple act of visiting an Internet site can be extremely damaging to the system. An unfamiliar Internet site may have Trojan horse code that can be downloaded to the system and executed. If you are logged on with administrator privileges, a Trojan horse could do things like reformat your hard drive, delete all your files, create a new user account with administrative access, and so on.
You should add yourself to the Users or Power Users group. When you log on as a member of the Users group, you can perform routine tasks, including running programs and visiting Internet sites, without exposing your computer to unnecessary risk. As a member of the Power Users group, you can perform routine tasks and you can also install programs, add printers, and use most Control Panel items. If you need to perform administrative tasks, such as upgrading the operating system or configuring system parameters, then log off and log back on as an administrator.
If you frequently need to log on as an administrator, you can use the runas command to start programs as an administrator.
To start a program as an administrator
1. In Windows Explorer, click the program executable file that you want to open.
2. Press SHIFT and hold, right-click the program icon, and then click Run as.
3. To log on using an Administrator account, click The following user.
4. In User name and Password, type the Administrator account name and password that you want to use.
Notes
Use this procedure if you want to perform administrative tasks when you are logged on as a member of another group, such as Users or Power Users.
If you want to run a program as a domain administrator, in User name, type the name of the domain followed by the administrator account name. For example:
DomainName\AdministratorName
Use of Run as is not limited to Administrator accounts.
If you try to start a program, such as an MMC console or Control Panel item, from a network location using Run as, it could fail if the credentials used to connect to the network share are different from the credentials used to start the program. The credentials used to run the program might not be able to gain access to the same network share.
If Run as fails, the Secondary Logon service may not be running. For more information, click Related Topics.
You can also use Run as from the command prompt.
To create a shortcut using the runas command
1. Right-click the desktop, point to New, and then click Shortcut.
2. In Type the location of the item, type runas and the command parameters you want to use. See examples in the following table.
To create a shortcut to A command prompt with administrator credentials
Type:
runas /user:ComputerName\administrator cmd
The title bar of this window will indicate the credentials under which it is running.

Why you should not run your computer as an administrator
Running Windows 2000 or Windows XP as an administrator makes the system vulnerable to Trojan horses and other security risks. The simple act of visiting an Internet site can be extremely damaging to the system. An unfamiliar Internet site may have Trojan horse code that can be downloaded to the system and executed. If you are logged on with administrator privileges, a Trojan horse could do things like reformat your hard drive, delete all your files, create a new user account with administrative access, and so on.
You should add yourself to the Users or Power Users group. When you log on as a member of the Users group, you can perform routine tasks, including running programs and visiting Internet sites, without exposing your computer to unnecessary risk. As a member of the Power Users group, you can perform routine tasks and you can also install programs, add printers, and use most Control Panel items. If you need to perform administrative tasks, such as upgrading the operating system or configuring system parameters, then log off and log back on as an administrator.
If you frequently need to log on as an administrator, you can use the runas command to start programs as an administrator. For more information, see To start programs as an administrator
Groups and default security settings
Identify members of local groups
Create a shortcut using runas command parameters
Create a shortcut using runas command parameters
Log off the computer

See linked pages here:
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documen...n.mspx?mfr=true

#4 usasma

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 08:37 AM

In an adminstrator account, go to Start...Run...and type in "control userpasswords2" (without the quotes) and press Enter.

In the dialog that opens, left click once on the account that you want to open automatically. Then, uncheck the box that says "Users must enter a user name and password to use this computer". Then click on Apply.

You'll be prompted for the password for this account. Once that's done, OK your way out of the dialog. The next time you reboot, the account will automatically load.
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