Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Blown power supply in grandpas computer please help!!!


  • Please log in to reply
72 replies to this topic

#1 Fields46391

Fields46391

  • Members
  • 33 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:56 AM

Posted 15 February 2017 - 07:51 PM

I feel kinda dumb for asking such a simple question, but I don't have time to research this so bare with Me please. My grandpa loaned me a spare PC of his he built when mine started messing up, and a little while ago I blew the power supply. However I got my PC working so I didn't mess with it, now hes starting to bring his PC up in conversationn. I just don't have the heart to tell him what happened, he takes a lot of pride in the PCs he builds, and I really don't want to let the man down. So I was wanting to just replace it so it can be working before he ends up stopping by, but Im having trouble finding a replacement. I tried pulling up the same exact one online, which is a Enermax ATX 12V VER. 1.2 EG465P-VE (24P) , but everywhere I look its sold out. So could someone please help by pointing me to place I could find this model for sale or recommending some other power supplies with the same set ups that will be just as good. Im not to sure on how to go about figuring out what power supplies are right for a specific mother board. I really hope someone's able to help me so I can avoid disappointing the man he really means a lot to me. So I'd really appreciate any help thank you.

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 RolandJS

RolandJS

  • Members
  • 4,533 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Austin TX metro area
  • Local time:02:56 AM

Posted 15 February 2017 - 07:57 PM

Here's one way to look for things via Google, Bing, Amazon, Ebay, etc.:

Write the boring tech facts of the power supply, which should be on one of the blown PS's labels.

Of course, keeping in mind the manufacturer name and model:

-- look for power supplies matching the molex connectors [this is very important!]

-- ditto...matching the, or greater than the, wattage output; I think all PSs will be 110-120v, similar amperage[?]

-- ditto...matching the physical size and the ways and means of attaching PS to the desktop

 

If you have something similar to Altex Electronics, Best Buy, Fry's Electronics; or better yet:

as dc3 would indicate -- best to go to a business oriented computer store/fix-it place and work with the techs there [bring the blown PS with you if you visit a place personally]

Not blaming you one iota, what exactly happened that blew the now defunct power supply?

Going forward, perhaps we can avoid a repeat.


Edited by RolandJS, 15 February 2017 - 08:01 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#3 RolandJS

RolandJS

  • Members
  • 4,533 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Austin TX metro area
  • Local time:02:56 AM

Posted 15 February 2017 - 08:04 PM

If you post the exact specs listed on the power supply -- maybe somebody here strong in hardware can help you locate an equivalent or better power supply.


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#4 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 24,310 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:03:56 AM

Posted 15 February 2017 - 08:14 PM

Personally, I would tell your grandfather what happened and offer to reimburse him for a new PSU. I am sure he can determine the best replacement.



#5 Fields46391

Fields46391
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 33 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:56 AM

Posted 16 February 2017 - 01:04 AM

-RolandJS here is a link to a pick of the exact specs also in regards to your question on what happened I was using the surge protector else where in my house and and made the bad decision of plugging the PC straight into an outlet and it sparked and havnt worked since
Link to my pic of the specs lable

file:///data/data/com.evernote/files/magic/1487224613426/COLOR_DOCUMENT/0/IMG_20170215_235653.426.jpg

#6 Fields46391

Fields46391
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 33 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:56 AM

Posted 16 February 2017 - 01:10 AM

Sorry about the link try this
https://www.evernote.com/shard/s419/sh/211bc001-d2a9-41ab-bd23-46ed5b8d77c2/7a9d46dbf9e47e2e48a40e60ff98221c

#7 Fields46391

Fields46391
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 33 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:56 AM

Posted 16 February 2017 - 09:58 AM

If you post the exact specs listed on the power supply -- maybe somebody here strong in hardware can help you locate an equivalent or better power supply.


https://www.evernote.com/shard/s419/sh/211bc001-d2a9-41ab-bd23-46ed5b8d77c2/7a9d46dbf9e47e2e48a40e60ff98221c

#8 ranchhand_

ranchhand_

  • Members
  • 1,674 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Midwest
  • Local time:01:56 AM

Posted 17 February 2017 - 08:37 AM

You have an ATX 460 Watt standard power supply, nothing special or complicated.

For example, HERE is one that will work from Newegg, and it's reasonably priced; it is getting acceptable users' reviews. Free shipping, possibly no tax (depending on what state you live in). If you have any problems within 30 days, call Newegg on their customer service 800 number, explain what happened, and most likely they will e-mail you a pre-paid shipping label and you can either reorder another or exchange.  They have stellar customer service and I have never had a problem with them in all the years I have been ordering.

If you know how to replace a power supply (it's easy) you are good to go. If you need help, just post back.

 

 

...a little while ago I blew the power supply.

Don't feel guilty, like you did something wrong. The PS your grandpa had was a lower-quality brand to start with, and most likely it was ready to go anyway. You cannot "break it" by just plugging it in to a regular wall socket, it is supposed to be plugged in to make it work, right?  A surge protector protects against sudden surges of electricity from the incoming line, but that was not the cause of it failing. I am sure your Grandpa understands this.


Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#9 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 24,310 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:03:56 AM

Posted 17 February 2017 - 09:37 AM

Not to hijack the thread but maybe someone can answer this question. I noticed on the image the OP posted of the PSU the 3.3 rail was rated at 35 amps. All modern PSU's are either 20 or 25 amps on the 3.3v rail. 

 

I came across this page.

 

http://www.brighthub.com/computing/hardware/articles/34032.aspx

 

Okay, so how does this affect you? Well, older PSUs of the same wattage as newer ones may have a much lower power rating on the 12V rails. It would not be a good idea, therefore, to cannibalise an old PC for its otherwise perfectly serviceable PSU to use in a newer PC. The chances are, you would be overloading and overheating it to some extent. Conversely, a new PSU used to repair an older computer may not supply sufficient power at the lower voltages, again risking overloading.

More important here is that the -5V rail is no longer used on motherboards, so new PSUs tend not to provide a -5V rail. If you're using a PC that old, you'd be better off replacing the motherboard and processor, but that's another story.

 

I am wondering what is the reason for the high amps of the 3.3v rail on the OP's PSU. Also the OP's PSU has a -5V rail rated at 1 amp. I guess my question is do modern PSU's work fine on an older MB/CPU combo.


Edited by JohnC_21, 17 February 2017 - 09:37 AM.


#10 ranchhand_

ranchhand_

  • Members
  • 1,674 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Midwest
  • Local time:01:56 AM

Posted 17 February 2017 - 09:56 AM

Good question, John!  All I can say is that the majority of units I work on are older ones that folks bring in for servicing. I have replaced old PSs with new ones and had no problems, I just make sure that the wattage is equal or higher than the old unit....no complaints so far. My standard operating procedure is to first check the power supply on any unit that comes in, even if the problem is not related to a power supply issue. So far both my testers have had no problems testing the older PSs, or the newer ones also, and the voltage readings are usually within tolerances. If there were any overloads or underloads they would show up on the LED readouts. But that is all I really know about it. 


Edited by ranchhand_, 17 February 2017 - 09:57 AM.

Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#11 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,690 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:12:56 AM

Posted 17 February 2017 - 12:21 PM

Not to hijack the thread but maybe someone can answer this question. I noticed on the image the OP posted of the PSU the 3.3 rail was rated at 35 amps. All modern PSU's are either 20 or 25 amps on the 3.3v rail. 

 

I came across this page.

 

http://www.brighthub.com/computing/hardware/articles/34032.aspx

 

I am wondering what is the reason for the high amps of the 3.3v rail on the OP's PSU. Also the OP's PSU has a -5V rail rated at 1 amp. I guess my question is do modern PSU's work fine on an older MB/CPU combo.

The negative rail voltages are almost obsolete.  For example, the -5V rail was used for the IAS bus on older motherboards, this bus no longer exists with modern motherboards.  The -12 rail is still used in some systems.  Because modern PSUs don't include the -5V rail you wouldn't be able to use a modern PSU on a motherboard which uses a ISA bus.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#12 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 24,310 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:03:56 AM

Posted 17 February 2017 - 12:31 PM

 

Not to hijack the thread but maybe someone can answer this question. I noticed on the image the OP posted of the PSU the 3.3 rail was rated at 35 amps. All modern PSU's are either 20 or 25 amps on the 3.3v rail. 

 

I came across this page.

 

http://www.brighthub.com/computing/hardware/articles/34032.aspx

 

I am wondering what is the reason for the high amps of the 3.3v rail on the OP's PSU. Also the OP's PSU has a -5V rail rated at 1 amp. I guess my question is do modern PSU's work fine on an older MB/CPU combo.

The negative rail voltages are almost obsolete.  For example, the -5V rail was used for the IAS bus on older motherboards, this bus no longer exists with modern motherboards.  The -12 rail is still used in some systems.  Because modern PSUs don't include the -5V rail you wouldn't be able to use a modern PSU on a motherboard which uses a ISA bus.

 

Thanks for the additional info dc3.



#13 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,690 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:12:56 AM

Posted 17 February 2017 - 12:43 PM

You are welcome John.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#14 Fields46391

Fields46391
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 33 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:56 AM

Posted 17 February 2017 - 03:17 PM

So every that is being discussed here about new and modern power supplies is really confusing me. I mean it explains why I was having a hard time finding a power supply with the apeca as my blown one but don't know what's safe to use now. I already bought one someone recommended. I will post a link to the one I bought below along with a link of a pic of the board
Let me know what you guys think.

Power supply:
https://m.newegg.com/Product/index?itemnumber=N82E16817151095

Current Motherboard:
https://goo.gl/photos/HkC8yMhdA56JBZzG8

#15 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 24,310 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:03:56 AM

Posted 17 February 2017 - 03:24 PM

Here is your support page.

 

https://www.asus.com/Motherboards/M5A97/

 

This is a modern motherboard and as far as I can tell your PSU is fine for the ASUS. 






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users