Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Clean Install of Windows 10 On Ubuntu Machine


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 dinnertable

dinnertable

  • Members
  • 2 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:10:34 AM

Posted 11 February 2017 - 07:44 PM

Hello everyone!

 

So today I bought a laptop that came with Ubuntu installed on it. It's a Dell Inspiron 5567 with an SSD. As I would much rather have a version of Windows on it, I decided to make a bootable USB to install it. After changing a few of the BIOS settings to enable legacy mode and disable secure booting, I finally got the computer to boot off the usb. When I go to choosing the partitions, I realized windows wouldn't be able to install onto any of the 4 partitions. From what I understand, this is due to how Ubuntu handles the MBR? The 4 partitions are: the system reserved one (~500mb), the partition the OS was probably installed on (~3 Gb), the free space partition, and some other empty partition. Anyways, I read that the recommended move is to delete all the partitions, until one last partition of unallocated space is left. I'm rather inexperienced when it comes to this sort of stuff, so I am unsure if this is a safe move. 

 

Another related question is what would happen if the whole drive was completely wiped. There would be no boot manager and any of that I assume, so would the BIOS still be accessible? I realize that the BIOS isn't actually on the hard drive, so this is why I'm a little unsure about this. As a worst case scenario, could we install Windows 10 with no boot manager or anything on the hard drive? 

 

Thanks in advance.


Edited by dinnertable, 11 February 2017 - 07:44 PM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Chris Cosgrove

Chris Cosgrove

  • Moderator
  • 7,112 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:03:34 PM

Posted 11 February 2017 - 08:06 PM

First of all - welcome to BC !

 

If you want a totally Win 10 computer, which I think is what you want, then yes you can just wipe the drive completely before you do the install but since, as far as I know, a complete fresh install of Win 10 will format the drive anyway why don't you just run the Win 10 install ?  You have the computer booting off the USB just try the next step 'Install Win 10' and see what happens.

 

There are tools such as Gparted which make removing partitions easy but since I have no experience with them I will offer no advice on their use.

 

And yes your BIOS would still be available, BIOS runs before the OS starts, no OS is needed for the BIOS to run.

 

Chris Cosgrove


Edited by Chris Cosgrove, 11 February 2017 - 08:08 PM.


#3 DeimosChaos

DeimosChaos

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,422 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States, Delaware
  • Local time:10:34 AM

Posted 11 February 2017 - 09:43 PM

Welcome to BC!

 

As Chris stated, you can just run the Windows 10 installer, and wipe the drive from within there. You can always re-install Ubuntu if you wish to have it on there. But it sounds like you don't want it all anyway. It won't hurt the PC to wipe the drive completely. The BIOS aren't stored on the drive, but on a chip on the motherboard, so wiping the drive will still let you access the BIOS.


OS - Ubuntu 14.04/16.04 & Windows 10
Custom Desktop PC / Lenovo Y580 / Sager NP8258 / Dell XPS 13 (9350)
_____________________________________________________
Bachelor of Science in Computing Security from Drexel University
Security +


#4 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 3,277 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:10:34 AM

Posted 12 February 2017 - 02:55 AM

Why not try Ubuntu first?

Or set up a dual boot?

There is nothing wrong with linux really, sure no big blue E or game support but Linux isnt so bad.

Sure ubuntu really isnt the best distro for a first time linux but its not so bad once you get used to it


Edited by MadmanRB, 12 February 2017 - 03:00 AM.

You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

xu847p-6.png


#5 KyleBrady

KyleBrady

  • Members
  • 3 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:34 PM

Posted 12 February 2017 - 09:50 AM

I also think that first, you can run the installer Windows. if will not install as it should then try to completely format the hard drive and reinstall Windows.



#6 pcpunk

pcpunk

  • Members
  • 6,238 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:10:34 AM

Posted 12 February 2017 - 11:21 AM

I realized windows wouldn't be able to install onto any of the 4 partitions. From what I understand, this is due to how Ubuntu handles the MBR? The 4 partitions are: the system reserved one (~500mb), the partition the OS was probably installed on (~3 Gb), the free space partition, and some other empty partition.

I'm very curious about this my friend, would you like to entertain my insanity just a little?  If so run this Command in the Ubuntu Terminal and Post the outcome to the forum.  This way we could see what those Partitios are exactly, well, good enough.  This is purely curosity my friend, no need to do this if you don't want too.

sudo parted -l

Anyways, I read that the recommended move is to delete all the partitions, until one last partition of unallocated space is left. I'm rather inexperienced when it comes to this sort of stuff, so I am unsure if this is a safe move. 

I've never done this in W10 but yes, this is how you would do it,  Delete all Partitions then Install.

 

pc


Edited by pcpunk, 12 February 2017 - 11:22 AM.

sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#7 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 9,295 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:10:34 AM

Posted 12 February 2017 - 11:35 AM

As has been mentioned, repeatedly, earlier in this thread if one elects to do a clean installation of Windows 10 it will handle the wiping of the drive and partitioning as part of the process.  The usual result being a C: drive that uses all available space except for a recovery partition.  If you don't want that arrangement you can then do partition tweaking after Windows is installed.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#8 dinnertable

dinnertable
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 2 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:10:34 AM

Posted 15 February 2017 - 09:03 AM

Thank you all very much for your replies! I just ended up deleting all of the partitions and continuing the installer from there, and it worked out perfectly. The other times I've installed a new operating system it was on drive formatted for windows initially, so this was sort of new for me. Sorry I didn't entertain your insanity pcpunk, but thanks for your input regardless.


Edited by dinnertable, 15 February 2017 - 09:04 AM.


#9 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 24,641 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:10:34 AM

Posted 15 February 2017 - 09:38 AM

After changing a few of the BIOS settings to enable legacy mode and disable secure booting

 

If you installed Windows 10 using Legacy Mode you gave up the advantage of using UEFI with SecureBoot which is what Windows 10 was designed for. A GPT disk also has advantages over MBR. Some malware targeting MBR disks cannot infect a GPT disk.



#10 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 9,295 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:10:34 AM

Posted 15 February 2017 - 09:44 AM

JohnC_21 wrote: "If you installed Windows 10 using Legacy Mode you gave up the advantage of using UEFI with SecureBoot which is what Windows 10 was designed for. A GPT disk also has advantages over MBR. Some malware targeting MBR disks cannot infect a GPT disk."

 

Not that this is not true, but it certainly isn't enough of a concern for me, anyway, to even consider reinstalling on a machine set up in Legacy Mode.  Particularly since most malware infections are the direct result of end user action.

 

The thread, How Did I Get Infected?, makes for good reading.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#11 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 24,641 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:10:34 AM

Posted 15 February 2017 - 10:40 AM

JohnC_21 wrote: "If you installed Windows 10 using Legacy Mode you gave up the advantage of using UEFI with SecureBoot which is what Windows 10 was designed for. A GPT disk also has advantages over MBR. Some malware targeting MBR disks cannot infect a GPT disk."

 

Not that this is not true, but it certainly isn't enough of a concern for me, anyway, to even consider reinstalling on a machine set up in Legacy Mode.  Particularly since most malware infections are the direct result of end user action.

 

The thread, How Did I Get Infected?, makes for good reading.

True, I would not recommend reinstalling the OS at this point. 






1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users