Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Failing Hard Drive -Please Advise


  • Please log in to reply
131 replies to this topic

#1 book.weaver

book.weaver

  • Members
  • 252 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 11 February 2017 - 02:30 PM

Hello,

 

     I have been on these forums for months now, getting amazing help from the kind people on this website.  For those interested in my computer's saga, I believe one can find a list of my topics by checking out my profile.  My most recent topic/post is found here:  https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/638460/com-surrogate-error/page-6

 

     My internal hard drive (a Seagate make) is on it's way out.  I have a HP Pavilion G6, purchased in 2012, running a very fresh install of Windows 7 Service Pack 1.  Unfortunately, it only ran smoothly for about a week and a half before having file system issues that are suspected to be a result of the damage done to my hard drive this past summer from overheating.

 

     I'm going to sum up two posts from my other topic...

 

I ran an HDD Scan with these alarmingly slow-to-respond sector results:

 

< 500 ms  - 684

 

> 500 ms - 40

 

Bads - 0

 

     I've been meaning to get an external hard drive and finally have the opportunity... I have a few questions because, unfortunately, I am probably going to have to choose between internal or external, for now.

 

1. I would really prefer to get an external hard drive, but in the case that my internal drive should fail, would I be able to run my laptop on the external drive somehow?  ...at least until I could get an internal one, anyway...

 

2. This computer is several years old.  Would getting an internal drive even be worth the myriad of risks from having to take this laptop apart to install it?  Also, could a new internal drive actually help this old laptop to last a while longer?  If not, the money for an internal drive could instead be a little chip off the price of a new laptop a while down the road...

 

3.  This one is probably very silly, but there is a nice model of external drives I found made by Western Digital -I know it would be compatible with my computer, but would a Seagate be better because that's what my internal drive is?

 

     All my data fits on my flash drives, I have a Macrium Reflect Rescue Disk, and I'm still utilizing my other topic to figure out a temporary fix for my file system until I can get a hard drive.  This last time I installed Win 7, once I got all my data and programs on, it worked fine for about a week and a half before I began having issues.  

 

4. I'm probably going to have to reformat my disk again -once I do, is there anything I could do to help prevent or slow my system from getting messed up until I have a new internal drive or new machine?

 

 Sorry for all these questions from a newb and thank you so very much for your time!


Edited by book.weaver, 11 February 2017 - 02:37 PM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 5,506 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 11 February 2017 - 02:53 PM

Depending on your UEFI/BIOS there may be a way to designate an external USB drive as your primary boot device, but even if there were I would not encourage anyone to do that.

 

My advice to you would be to go out and promptly get yourself a new internal hard drive which can be the same capacity or larger as the existing one as well as acquiring a USB cable that allows you to connect that drive to the machine as though it were an external drive.  These are cheap and readily available.  As soon as you have that I would download the free disk cloning software of your choice (I've used Miray HDClone Free Edition, see the HDClone6 page) and clone your current hard drive while its still functioning.  If you're in the "impending hardware failure" stage, and it appears you are, time is of the essence and cloning does not carry over any hardware issues.  The cloned drive is then a "plug and play" replacement for your existing hard drive.  If you do buy a larger one, once it is installed in the laptop you can use a partition manager to either make a second logical drive on the remaining space on the physical drive or extend the partition that was cloned to use the unallocated extra space.

 

Normally there is a door on the bottom of your laptop under which your hard drive is found.  Laptop hard drives are generally, and truly, plug and play when you have a cloned drive to substitute.  They typically have a small metal enclosure with a screw or two to hold them into place and once you remove those you simply slide the drive away from the connector and it pops right out.  Putting the new one in is just as easy.

 

You are wasting your time if the diagnostics on your existing drive indicate an impending hardware failure by reformatting it, etc.  If you know you're on borrowed time then grab a replacement internal drive, and I am not brand loyal as I've had issues at one time or another with virtually any make you can name, clone your existing one to it, install it, and go on your merry way.

 

You are also living on borrowed time and the longer you push a failing drive the more likely it is to fail before you can get it cloned.  Do what needs to be done with all reasonable haste.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose
              

 


#3 book.weaver

book.weaver
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 252 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 11 February 2017 - 03:31 PM

Wow, this is an absolute game changer.  I had no idea that an internal drive could be plugged into my laptop and used like an external one.  So, I merely need to get an internal one, clone mine onto it, and then replace my old one with it?  Then, say I got a new laptop with the horrid windows 10 I so desperately want to evade forever, I could simply pop that drive in and have my beloved Win 7 already perfected with my programs and customizations...  <3  That's absolutely wonderful to know!  (And rather fascinating.)  Thank you so very much, sir!

 

I hope you don' mind, but I am having trouble finding some of this info myself -I'm looking into the new Seagate Barracuda and FireCuda (1 tarabyte) internal hard drives, and don't know what kind of ports they have (if any.)  Are they compatible with a simple usb to usb cord?  Also, if you know off hand, do you think one of those would fit/work fine in my laptop?

 

A million thanks to you Brian!  ~I was referred to one of your tutorial videos when I was learning to use Macrium and found it immensely helpful, as well.  ^_^  

 

EDIT:  Oh, it needs a USB to SATA cord.  (I had no idea what SATA was.  I'm sorry for the needless question!)


Edited by book.weaver, 11 February 2017 - 03:43 PM.


#4 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 2,087 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 11 February 2017 - 03:36 PM

Actually you will need to go buy a internal drive right now and see if you can get a external enclosure for the initial backup.

Windows wont boot off a external drive so its best to clone what you can then move the drive internally.

Do you have any backup medium right now?


You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

gh8un5-6.png


#5 book.weaver

book.weaver
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 252 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 11 February 2017 - 03:50 PM

Oh.  I cannot merely clone without an enclosure of some sort?  That makes sense, considering that the internal drives certainly do look as though they belong inside of something...   :unsure:   *I should have noted that sooner.*  The problem is I am on very limited funds at this time; still trying to determine my options.

 

As far as backup, I have a Macrium Reflect rescue disk, multiple re-writable disks at my disposal, and two flash drives that hold all my data.



#6 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 2,087 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 11 February 2017 - 03:55 PM

I can understand limited funds.

What sort of money can you deal with?


You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

gh8un5-6.png


#7 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 5,506 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 11 February 2017 - 06:23 PM

Oh.  I cannot merely clone without an enclosure of some sort?  

 

Yes, you can clone without an enclosure.  I routinely do so when I know that the drive is to be transplanted in to the machine that's being cloned as soon as the clone is complete.

 

By the way, you cannot just plug the boot drive from one computer into another and expect it to work.  I have no idea why you fear Windows 10, it's been great for me.  I loved Windows 7, hated Windows 8, and love Windows 10.  It's the wedding of pretty much everything you loved about Win7 and earlier along with what was good in the new stuff in Windows 8.

 

By cloning the drive you are essentially creating an exact duplicate that your machine will not recognize as a replacement and where what is known by UEFI/BIOS is carried over in the arrangement on the replacement clone.  If you tuck a boot disc (whether HDD or SSD) into some random other machine, even the same make and model, you will frequently have chaos ensue.  Not always, though, but you have to do quite a few checks to make sure the recipient machine was configured in the same way as the donor one was.  I did this once a very long time ago with an Acer laptop where I started to have a hardware failure and bought its twin that had experienced a hard disc failure and that worked perfectly.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose
              

 


#8 book.weaver

book.weaver
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 252 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 11 February 2017 - 06:30 PM

Sorry for my delayed response.  I did not see your reply before the website crashed, and I've only just noticed that I could get back on Bleeping Computer.  Well, I've learned a lot since my post this morning, haha, and think I figured out something I can do.  If someone would be so kind as to help me make sure everything is compatible and I didn't miss anything or make any mistakes, that would be wonderful!

 

My internal drive is a Seagate SATA PATA model number ST9750420AS and I would like to replace it with the "Seagate 1TB Barracuda SATA 6GB/s 128MB Cache 2.5-Inch 7mm Internal Bare/OEM Hard Drive (ST1000LM048).”  My only question in that regard is, will the Barracuda, being only 7 mm or .28 in be too thin for my laptop?  I think this drive is probably .37 in or so and wasn’t certain if a slimmer drive would be an issue.

 

Also, on a similar note, there are two enclosures that look very promising.  It may sound rather silly, but if given the choice between one that has a foam pad to help minimize vibration for 7mm and below HDD’s but no UASP support, or one with no foam pad but with UASP support, which would be better?  (I could get one with both, but it doesn’t have as many or quite as good reviews, so I would rather pick one of the aforementioned options.)

 

Thank you everyone, so very much!   =D

 

EDIT:  Oh, just saw that Brian replied again, as well -I gotta go back to read it...


Edited by book.weaver, 11 February 2017 - 06:31 PM.


#9 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 5,506 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 11 February 2017 - 06:34 PM

By the way, the full service and maintenance manual for your computer is available at:  http://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c02770249.pdf 

 

Not that you should be able to comprehend the whole thing, but the section on mass storage devices will show you the sizes (as in physical, not drive capacity) that this machine can support.  It does support 7mm drives.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose
              

 


#10 book.weaver

book.weaver
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 252 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 11 February 2017 - 07:31 PM

I think I would prefer to go ahead and get an enclosure rather than a cord compatible with the drive.  Thank you very much for the link to the manual.  (By the way, for some reason the link didn't work until I deleted the .pdf extension.  Then I was able to open and download.)  I feel like a bit of a knucklehead...I have the original box in my closet, which in all likelihood has the manual in it.   :blush:   I should have thought of that earlier!

 

In regard to drive capacity, 1 tb is far more than what the manual says my laptop will support.  I should probably stick with what the manual says, correct?  In which case, I have some more searching to do...



#11 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 5,506 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 11 February 2017 - 11:17 PM

I really cannot understand why you would want to spend the money on an external drive enclosure when you intend to put the drive in to your laptop as soon as the cloning is done.  However, you have every right to do whatever you want, but an external drive enclosure will just gather dust afterward.  You do not want to even consider using your failing drive as a "permanent" external drive afterward because it is failing.

 

The manual is simply showing what was available from Dell at the time the machine was manufactured as far as drive options.  There is no issue with a 1TB drive other than you'll need to do some partition tweaking after it's installed to take advantage of all the extra space.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose
              

 


#12 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 2,087 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 11 February 2017 - 11:20 PM

Well yes one can buy an adapter I personally prefer a enclosure just in case there is static electricity

You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

gh8un5-6.png


#13 book.weaver

book.weaver
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 252 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 12 February 2017 - 03:02 PM

Pesky built up static electricity!   :lmao:   *ahem, sorry*  I know I couldn't use this old drive for anything.  I personally like the enclosure option because rather than purchase a cord I will in all likelihood only use this once, I can purchase the enclosure that a while down the road would allow me to use my nice newer 1 tb internal hard drive as an external back up drive once I can finally get a newer laptop.  

 

Thank you both for your help; I've learned so much.  Egads, it's a lot to take in...this is a whole new world of information for me.  I never mess with my system or hardware.  I'm a little disappointed to learn I can't simply pop my old system into a new computer, but that makes sense. I suppose I can venture into Win 10 eventually.  It just has so many extraneous features I would never use...but perhaps I could disable them or some other such thing to get them out of the way.

 

Anyhow, sorry, back to topic.  I've looked into partitioning before.  A few years ago, an engineer friend of mine was showing off Ubuntu at work and I even went ahead and burned an iso and very nearly set up a dual boot system.  I've often considered it (but maybe I'd use Mint instead of Ubuntu -will need to research more.)  If it's alright, I will need a bit of a refresher on how to set up a partition, especially in this kind of context since it's not quite the same as setting up a dual boot.

 

And thank you for confirming that the memory size is acceptable.  That's a relief.  I thought I may need to partition it, but otherwise everything seemed compatible, even the rpm.  Trying to find replacements by model was insanity...I was only finding refurbished drives that were selling for $200 or more!



#14 book.weaver

book.weaver
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 252 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 14 February 2017 - 02:26 PM

I'm getting the 1 tb Barracuda and an enclosure.  Thank you both for all your wonderful help and advice!   :)  (I can't help but laugh at the thought of me trying to clone my drive onto an exposed HDD.  I'd be afraid of impending disaster -whether a cat runs past at a bad time and damages something or I somehow get yet another of my numerous unfortunate electrical zaps!)

 

My order won't arrive for a bit, but when it does, would it be alright to post here again?  I'm not certain how I should configure the partition in this context.  I also wasn't sure if that would be better suited for another forum/topic or here since some of my specifications are already listed.

 

Thanks again and have a great day!



#15 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 5,506 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:04:12 AM

Posted 14 February 2017 - 03:50 PM

I'm getting the 1 tb Barracuda and an enclosure.  Thank you both for all your wonderful help and advice!   :)  (I can't help but laugh at the thought of me trying to clone my drive onto an exposed HDD.  I'd be afraid of impending disaster -whether a cat runs past at a bad time and damages something or I somehow get yet another of my numerous unfortunate electrical zaps!)

 

My order won't arrive for a bit, but when it does, would it be alright to post here again?  I'm not certain how I should configure the partition in this context.  I also wasn't sure if that would be better suited for another forum/topic or here since some of my specifications are already listed.

 

Thanks again and have a great day!

 

Of course it's alright to add on to this thread with specific questions that arrive once the drive arrives.

 

I have to laugh at the abject fear of having a laptop drive "unenclosed."   I just resurrected a Dell Inspiron 3000 series machine from the dead last night, and part of doing that was data retrieval from a user account before doing a "from scratch" installation of Windows 10.  I popped the drive out, connected my USB-to-SATA cable and my SATA power supply to the drive and plopped it on my lap desk next to my own laptop and copied away.  I have yet to fry a drive in years and years of doing it this way.  If I want to be really "fussy" I make sure that I have some sort of thick cotton fabric beneath the drive as a static protector, but I seldom even do that.  I know how to do a static discharge before touching things that might be harmed from a nasty shot of static electricity.  My experience has been that most of the fears in that regard are grossly overblown if one is even slightly careful about having discharged oneself and working in an environment where static is not all that likely in the first place.

 

Partitioning is one of those topics that could be addressed here or on another forum in BC, as software is used to do it.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose
              

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users