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This device can perform faster warning for no apparent reason


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#1 Zomalaja

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 10:02 PM

After using Windows 10 for months and months, now on every restart I get the warning that "This device can perform faster if connected to a High-Speed USB Port".

The problem is twofold. One, it does not say what device and Two, the only device I have connected to a USB 2 port is the mouse. My three external drives all connect to USB 3.0 ports. No other USB ports are in use,

SCreenshot of USBTreeView is attached, any ideas would be appreciated.

 

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#2 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 07 February 2017 - 11:25 AM

It sounds like you might be infected. Have you run any malware scans on your system.


594965_zpsp5exvyzm.png


#3 britechguy

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Posted 07 February 2017 - 12:04 PM

Actually, I'll disagree with you Rocky.  I used to have this message given to me all the time with one of the USB devices I had and never could figure out why I got it, and I did a lot of research and tweaking to try to rid myself of the message.

 

After I convinced myself I was not infected by running malwarebytes (I always have antivirus running) I just began to ignore it.

 

This was on a Windows 7 laptop, not Windows 10, but it was something that I never could solve and since the device itself worked as expected I just started to ignore the message.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#4 dc3

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Posted 07 February 2017 - 12:05 PM

Edit:  I agree with Brian, this doesn't sound like malware.

 

The USBtreeview is showing your mouse and three mass storage devices.  The three mass storage devices are listed a I, K, J.  Open the Start Menu and click/tap on This PC to see what these devices are. 

 

If the devices are not shown there press the Windows key windowskey_zps092d5c75.png and the X key.  If the menu that opens select Disk Management.  See if the devices are seen there.


Edited by dc3, 07 February 2017 - 12:06 PM.

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#5 devilus

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Posted 07 February 2017 - 12:18 PM

Last time I saw this message, it was related to a Transcend 64GB USB3.1/USB3.0 flash drive which was -partly- dead on arrival. Still using another brand without any warning message on the same USB port.


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#6 Zomalaja

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Posted 07 February 2017 - 11:28 PM

Edit:  I agree with Brian, this doesn't sound like malware.

 

The USBtreeview is showing your mouse and three mass storage devices.  The three mass storage devices are listed a I, K, J.  Open the Start Menu and click/tap on This PC to see what these devices are. 

 

If the devices are not shown there press the Windows key windowskey_zps092d5c75.png and the X key.  If the menu that opens select Disk Management.  See if the devices are seen there.

They are USB 3.0 external drives, I is a Seagate 5TB, J is a WD 4TB and K is a WD 3TB - They are shown in Disk Management.



#7 Zomalaja

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Posted 07 February 2017 - 11:32 PM

It sounds like you might be infected. Have you run any malware scans on your system.

I have MalwareBytes 3.0.6. and AVG Internet Security v 16.141.7998, a full scan with both shows nothing.



#8 britechguy

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 09:49 AM

Zomajala,

 

          Are you absolutely positive that all three are connected to USB 3.0 ports?  This sounds to me like one of them is not.

 

          You should also be able to determine which one is triggering this message if you eject them all and then reattach them one by one.  If this is a case of a drive being attached to a port that's not USB 3.0 then it should not matter which drive were to be inserted into a given port, any one of them would trigger that error.  If it's a problem with the drive then it shouldn't matter if it's inserted in what you absolutely now know to be a USB 3.0 port that works fine for any of the other drives, you should still get the error.

 

           There's a bit of detective work that still needs to be done as far as pinpointing what port or what drive or what combination of the two is causing this error to be generated.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#9 Angoid

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 09:55 AM

This is extremely unlikely to be the work of any kind of malware, so I'm not surprised that a malware scan turned up nothing.

It sounds like a hardware issue to me. Try this:

Let's call your external USB ports 1, 2 and 3.
Let's call your external drives A, B and C.
Let's also say that drive A is connect to USB port 1, drive B to USB 2, and drive C to USB 3.

Using "Safely remove hardware", 'disconnect' all three drives and then unplug them.
Now plug drive A into USB port 1 again. Give it a few seconds to recognise the drive. Note whether you get "This device can perform faster" or not.
If you don't, then plug drive B into USB port 2 and give it a few seconds again.
If you still don't receive the message, then repeat with drive C using USB port 3.
If you STILL don't get the error, then it was probably nothing more than a loose connection. It may or may not happen again at some point in the future: if it does, then it could be an internal connection in either your computer itself or the disk drive enclosure.

Use "Safely remove hardware" to 'disconnect' all the drives again as before and then unplug them.

I'm going to assume you got the message when you plugged drive B into USB 2, but the principle here will apply regardless of where/when it happened.

Plug drive B into a different USB port. Let's say you use 1. Do you receive the message?
If so, then there could be a fault on the drive, or a loose connection in it somewhere.
If not, then connect a different drive (let's say C) to USB 2. Do you receive the message?
If so, then there's a fault with USB port 2.

Hopefully that's clear - it's a process of elimination to try and find where there could be a fault!

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#10 Zomalaja

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Posted 11 February 2017 - 02:47 PM

This is extremely unlikely to be the work of any kind of malware, so I'm not surprised that a malware scan turned up nothing.

It sounds like a hardware issue to me. Try this:

Let's call your external USB ports 1, 2 and 3.
Let's call your external drives A, B and C.
Let's also say that drive A is connect to USB port 1, drive B to USB 2, and drive C to USB 3.

Using "Safely remove hardware", 'disconnect' all three drives and then unplug them.
Now plug drive A into USB port 1 again. Give it a few seconds to recognise the drive. Note whether you get "This device can perform faster" or not.
If you don't, then plug drive B into USB port 2 and give it a few seconds again.
If you still don't receive the message, then repeat with drive C using USB port 3.
If you STILL don't get the error, then it was probably nothing more than a loose connection. It may or may not happen again at some point in the future: if it does, then it could be an internal connection in either your computer itself or the disk drive enclosure.

Use "Safely remove hardware" to 'disconnect' all the drives again as before and then unplug them.

I'm going to assume you got the message when you plugged drive B into USB 2, but the principle here will apply regardless of where/when it happened.

Plug drive B into a different USB port. Let's say you use 1. Do you receive the message?
If so, then there could be a fault on the drive, or a loose connection in it somewhere.
If not, then connect a different drive (let's say C) to USB 2. Do you receive the message?
If so, then there's a fault with USB port 2.

Hopefully that's clear - it's a process of elimination to try and find where there could be a fault!

By following your suggestion I was not able to determine anything useful. However, by shutting down,plugging one drive in at a time, and restarting, it became clear that the WD 4TB is the culprit. It and only it causes that message to appear and copying a large file gives around 30MB/sec. The next thing I did was to  shutdown again and power off all the external drives, repeating the test gives no message and copying to the drive gives over 100 MB/sec, same as the other external drives and the same as copying from one internal drive to another internal drive.

 

I consider my question answered and offer my thanks to you.






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