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#1 LoLucky

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 11:50 AM

Correct me if i'm wrong but isn't this "Did you know?" statement a bit or 8 wrong? :flowers:

Did you know?
Definition: Gigabit - A unit of measurement for both data storage and data transfer. For storage it equates to 1024 megabits. For data transfer it equates to 1000 megabits.

Thought (i could be wrong)
Gigabit - Gb - Data Transfer
GigaByte - GB - Data Storage

Edit: Heh I go to front Forum page and what do i find

Did you know?
Definition: MegaByte - A unit of measurement for both data storage and data transfer. For storage it equates to 1024 kilobytes. For data transfer it equates to 1000 kilobytes.

isn't this one also a bit or 8 wrong? :thumbsup:

MegaByte - MB - Data Storage
Megabit - Mb - Data Transfer

Bit(one - ON/OFF) -> Nibble(4 Bits) -> Byte(8 Bits/2 Nibbles) -> KiloByte(1024 Bytes) -> MegaByte(1024 KiloBytes) -> GigaByte(1024 MegaBytes) -> TeraByte(1024 GigaBytes) ECT...

For electrical transfer don't you need to be ON/OFF?

Edited by LoLucky, 10 December 2004 - 12:25 PM.


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#2 raw

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 12:18 PM

MegaBit is abbreviated - Mb
MegaByte is - MB

128 MB = 8 x 128 Mb


Hope that adds to the confusion

Edited by raw, 10 December 2004 - 12:25 PM.

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#3 JEservices

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 12:26 PM

You are very observant.

You also bring up a very good point.

It is my understanding that it is a standard that data storage uses GigaByte (GB) and data transfer uses Gigabit (Gb). The reason why it shows both of them in the statement, is because the amounts are different.

It is very rare that you see a HD that says the capacity is Gb. If you do, hold on to it. It may be a collectors item :thumbsup:

It can be confusing when the industry does not stay to a standard. Hopefully it will be clearer in the years to come.

Technically when you move from kilo-, Mega-, Giga-, ect..., it is a multiple of 1024. The reason behind this is because of the binary system that the computer uses.

KiloByte=1024 Bytes
MegaByte=1024 KB (KiloBytes)
GigaByte=1024 MB (MegaBytes)
TeraByte=1024 GB (GigaBytes)
PetaByte=1024 TB (TeraBytes)

Using this, 1 PB (PetaByte)=136,339,441,844,224 Bytes

Can you imagine having to defrag that HD :trumpet:

To add to more confusion, some people round off the amounts to make it easier to remember. Of course that does not help any if people complain about the industry not having a real standard.

Dont believe me? Take a look at the link below. The following is a direct quote from them:

48-bit Logical Block Addressing (LBA) is a technology which extends the capacity of IDE ATA/ATAPI devices beyond a previous limit of 137.4 GB. This limit applies to IDE ATA/ATAPI devices only and not to SCSI interface devices. The original design specification for the ATA interface only provided 28-bits with which to address the devices. This meant that a hard disk could only have a maximum of 268,435,456 sectors of 512 bytes of data thus limiting the ATA interface to a maximum of 137.4 gigabytes. With 48-bit addressing the limit is 144 petabytes (144,000,000 gigabytes).



source: http://www.48bitlba.com/

My question to you would be, when you are talking about GB and PB, then how could you have even numbers~144,000,000~?

Awesome question though :flowers:
We are all curious like a cat. We wonder, we ask, we learn.
Please post back when a suggestion works, so that others may learn.

#4 LoLucky

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 12:27 PM

Nice raw No confusion added LOL Maybe we should do this post in Binary :thumbsup: WOW Binary haven't played with that in LONG time! Dec. Hex. Oct BLAH Binary = FUN!

Edited by LoLucky, 10 December 2004 - 12:41 PM.


#5 raw

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 12:33 PM

01111001011001010111001100100000011101110110010100100000011000110110111101110101011011000110010000100000011001000110111100100000011000100110100101100001011011100111001001111001

222JqDMgRrjeo 51gji3M.CXZtk

Can you imagine having to defrag that HD


We would use Linux. It has a journaling file system - no need to defrag :thumbsup:

Edited by raw, 10 December 2004 - 12:36 PM.

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#6 JEservices

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 12:36 PM

That would be interesting. Sending a message in binary and see if someone can translate it... :thumbsup:

01011001011011110111010100100000011000110110000101101110001000000111001001100101011000010110010000100000011000100110100101101110011000010111001001111001
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#7 JEservices

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 12:37 PM

Found the misspell Raw :thumbsup:
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#8 raw

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 12:39 PM

LOL...1's and 0's makes it hard to spell
Did you get the other ones?

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#9 Mr Alpha

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 12:45 PM

The word "byte" has several meanings, all closely related:

  1. A contiguous sequence of a fixed number of bits. On modern computers, an eight-bit byte or octet is by far the most common. This was not always the case. Certain older models have used six-, seven-, or nine-bit bytes - for instance on the 36-bit architecture of the PDP-10. Another example of a non eight-bit sequence is the 12-bit slab of the NCR-315. A byte is always atomic on the system, meaning that it is the smallest addressable unit. An eight-bit byte can hold 256 possible values (28 = 256) -- enough to store an unsigned integer ranging from 0 to 255, a signed integer from -128 to 127, or a character of a seven-bit (such as ASCII) or eight-bit character encoding.
  2. A contiguous sequence of bits that comprises a sub-field of a longer sequence known as a word. On some computers it is possible to address bytes of arbitrary length. This usage is reflected, for example, in LDB and DPB assembly instructions for field extraction on a PDP-10, which survive as bytewise operations in Common Lisp; and in the six-bit bytes of the IBM 1401.
  3. A datatype or synonym for a datatype in certain programming languages. C, for example, defines byte as a storage unit capable of at least being large enough to hold any character of the execution environment (clause 3.5 of the C standard). Since the C char integral data type can hold at least 8 bits (clause 5.2.4.2.1), a byte in C is at least capable of holding 256 different values (signed or unsigned char doesn't matter). Java plays it simpler. Java's integral byte data type is always defined as consisting of 8 bits and being a signed data type, holding values from -128 to 127.


Just to add to the confusion. :thumbsup:
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#10 LoLucky

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 12:53 PM

WOW you guys have to be using a translater or Supergeniouses :thumbsup:

I'm still working on them will get back to ya in an hour or so LOL

Can you imagine having to defrag that HD

OMG I want one! and *sigh* would probbly take like 100+ days to defrag that with the current Desktop speeds

#11 JEservices

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 12:58 PM

All you had to do was ask, and you shall receive :thumbsup:

binary conversion

Edited by JEservices, 10 December 2004 - 12:58 PM.

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#12 LoLucky

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 01:26 PM

BAH thats Cheating tho!

trying to rememeber Binary makes the brain work alot so i'll get a good night sleep.
yep yep

222JqDMgRrjeo 51gji3M.CXZtk

Looks like a Hash of some sort still working on Binary
MD-4 Hash?
MD-5?
Hmm...

#13 EdBee

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 01:51 PM

In days of old we called a group if binary digits a word--a word would translate (be read) as a single decimal number or an alpha character. The most popular was the hexidecimal word (hex).

But, I once worked on an Octal word sub-system (mil) that was used to assign track numbers to aircraft in flight (ours and theirs both). The highest decimal number that an Octal system word can become is the number 7. There is no decimal number 8 or 9 in this system. It goes from binary 000 (decimal #0) up to binary 111 (decimal 7). Eight distinct states or possibilities--thus "octal". Anyway the shortcoming of this system is that there would be a limitation on track numbers-a lot less than a hex system (no track number 898 for instance). However, if there would have been an need of that many track numbers to be assigned all at once it would have been WW3 and bye-bye world. What is interesting (to me anyway) is that back then the designers (Hughes Aircraft) used every trick possible to overcome the slowness and memory limits of this machine-using octal for the sub-system rather than hex to save time and memory. This system had a clock speed of 168 kilo-bits per sec (yes kilo). This was state of the art in 1960-- :flowers: :thumbsup: Didn't mean to bore you--I used to teach this Octal to repairmen/trainees-a very easy little number system to get across before going on to the difficult complex matters. :trumpet:
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#14 LoLucky

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 02:03 PM

K Think i finally remembered all the Letters i sure as heck hope you didn't use any numbers/symbols i can't remember them for the life of me!

EdBee sounds Like fun is that system still in use today?
I could do it for numbers N/P but when i'm doing Oct for Letters i Loathe it :flowers:

Heck i'm gunna keep on Editing this one. i think since there might be people who read that that don't have a clue what we're talking about. how bout we educate them some.

Edit: Wopps had them backwards this is correct (i Hope)

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
a - 01100001
b - 01100010
c - 01100011
d - 01100100
e - 01100101
f - 01100110
g - 01100111
h - 01101000
i - 01101001
j - 01101010
k - 01101011
l - 01101100
m - 01101101
n - 01101110
o - 01101111
p - 01110000
q - 01110001
r - 01110010
s - 01110011
t - 01110100
u - 01110101
v - 01110110
w - 01110111
x - 01111000
y - 01111001
z - 01111010

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
A - 01000001
B - 01000010
C - 01000011
D - 01000100
E - 01000101
F - 01000110
G - 01000111
H - 01001000
I - 01001001
J - 01001010
K - 01001011
L - 01001100
M - 01001101
N - 01001110
O - 01001111
P - 01010000
Q - 01010001
R - 01010010
S - 01010011
T - 01010100
U - 01010101
V - 01010110
W - 01010111
X - 01011000
Y - 01011001
Z - 01011010
SPACE - 00100000

For every letter/number/character there is a value called the ASCII value
in college i learned that 65-90 is A-Z and 97-122 is a-z (Why do you ask? Well this is one of the parts i'm explaining that i don't know the answer so i'm just giving facts)

And Every letter/number/symbol is 1 byte (8 bits) (ON=1/OFF=0)

Now here comes the not so fun part MATH! Don't worry if you can add and subtract this is EASY math!

Binary to Decimal
Converting 00001010 to Decimal
this is easy you just put your Binary number under this scale then add up the numbers above on the 1's you got your decimal number 0-255
128,64,32,16,8,4,2,1
0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 = 10 in Decimal

No Decimal to Binary
Converting 10 back into Binary
This is just as easy you take your decimal number and start from the 128 if 128 is equal or less than your decimal number you put a 1 then take that amount away if its more you put a zero then continue down the line to 64,32,16,8,4,2,1
so for our example
10 is less than 128 so 0
10 is less than 64 so 00
10 is less than 32 so 000
10 is less than 16 so 0000
10 is more than 8 so 00001
10-8=2 <new number
2 is less than 4 so 000010
2 is equal to 2 so 0000101
0 is less than 1 so 00001010

Simple as that now you know how to Make Binary into Decimal you can use the ALT+ code to find out what letter was coded. you do this by holding down ALT and on the Number pad (not above the letters) type in the Number you came up with dummy me forgot to use a good example so i could show you the ALT+10 Code :thumbsup:

Work in Progress i'll keep editing so Check back

Edited by LoLucky, 10 December 2004 - 03:59 PM.


#15 cowsgonemadd3

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Posted 10 December 2004 - 03:43 PM

You people have to much free time lol!

Trying to decifer windows code

10101010101010

thats says
10101010101010

lol




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