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How to set up a computer for quad-booting?


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#1 PotatoEggy

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 11:03 AM

Hi,

I am trying to setup four operating systems on my PC. Not sure if this is the right place to post it though.

The OSes are

  • CloudReady OS
  • Remix OS
  • Ubuntu
  • Windows 10

Preferably booted in that order. How can I set this up? Thanks in advance.

P.S.: I'm a noob at OS stuff, and it would help to give detailed instructions.



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#2 DeimosChaos

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 11:51 AM

Hi PotatoEggy! Welcome to BC!

 

The first thing that you will want to do is setup your partitioning on your hard drives for each of the four operating systems. You will then want to start with installing Windows (if it isn't already installed). If you install any of the Linux OSes first and windows last, Windows boot manager will overwrite the ones for Linux. You can get it they way you want after that, but its easier if you just start by installing Windows followed by the rest.

 

What is your comfort level with Linux? have you used a program called "GParted" before? That is usually the easiest one to use to get your drives all setup. I'll look for some instructions for you on that - some other users might post with some as well since a few user it here.


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#3 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 12:09 PM

Hi, PotatoEggy.....and welcome to the 'gang'.

 

I'll second DeimosChaos' advice about installing Windows first. Any combination of Windows & Linux, you must install Windows first.....and I'm afraid you will find that it insists on using the very first partition on the drive. If you try to install it in last position, it'll throw all kinds of wobblies. It doesn't want to know. Windows doesn't like to 'share'...so you have to let it think it's got everything its own way.

 

Then you can change things around afterwards, once you get your Linux OSs installed. They're much more forgiving..!

 

Personally, I'm running 9 'Puppies' on my rig......and the Wiz is running over 30 different distros on one of his..!!

 

Over to you, Deimos.....

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 02 February 2017 - 12:12 PM.

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#4 MadmanRB

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 12:43 PM

I would just dualboot, as RemixOS and CloudReady OS are not as versatile as a pure linux distro.

But yes install windows first, its good advice as windows is both space hungry and will alter bootloaders.


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#5 PotatoEggy

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 12:46 PM

Hi, PotatoEggy.....and welcome to the 'gang'.

 

I'll second DeimosChaos' advice about installing Windows first. Any combination of Windows & Linux, you must install Windows first.....and I'm afraid you will find that it insists on using the very first partition on the drive. If you try to install it in last position, it'll throw all kinds of wobblies. It doesn't want to know. Windows doesn't like to 'share'...so you have to let it think it's got everything its own way.

 

Then you can change things around afterwards, once you get your Linux OSs installed. They're much more forgiving..!

 

Personally, I'm running 9 'Puppies' on my rig......and the Wiz is running over 30 different distros on one of his..!!

 

Over to you, Deimos.....

 

 

Mike.  :wink:

 

 

Hi PotatoEggy! Welcome to BC!

 

The first thing that you will want to do is setup your partitioning on your hard drives for each of the four operating systems. You will then want to start with installing Windows (if it isn't already installed). If you install any of the Linux OSes first and windows last, Windows boot manager will overwrite the ones for Linux. You can get it they way you want after that, but its easier if you just start by installing Windows followed by the rest.

 

What is your comfort level with Linux? have you used a program called "GParted" before? That is usually the easiest one to use to get your drives all setup. I'll look for some instructions for you on that - some other users might post with some as well since a few user it here.

 

Wow! You guys are fast! Didn't know that was possible :mellow: .  And Madman posts as I am writing this.

Well, yes I've got Windows installed (who doesn't), and I have no experience with partitioning drives, sorry. Any instructions?

 

EDIT: OK then Madman, what would you suggest as a fast-booting operating system that looks OK? Because I'm trying to use CloudReady as a substitute for Chrome OS. I just found Remix OS Player though, that'll do for Android emulating.


Edited by PotatoEggy, 02 February 2017 - 12:50 PM.


#6 MadmanRB

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 12:49 PM

Partitioning is easy as long as you study up on it.

Gparted in linux is very easy to use, just make sure to defrag your windows partition (unless this is a SSD)


Edited by MadmanRB, 02 February 2017 - 12:50 PM.

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#7 PotatoEggy

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 12:51 PM

Partitioning is easy as long as you study up on it.

Gparted in linux is very easy to use, just make sure to defrag your windows partition (unless this is a SSD)

Ok then, I'll get back to you about it. 



#8 MadmanRB

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 12:53 PM

As for using other OS's you can use virtual machine software like vmwareplayer and virtualbox


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#9 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 01:07 PM

@madman:-

 

Good recommendation on using VMs.

 

@PotatoEggy:-

 

madman's right about gParted. It's an interactive GUI app for formatting & partitioning drives. You can move partitions around, and resize them, more or less by 'dragging' them on the graphical representation of your drive.

 

It's very easy to use.....and much more intuitive than Windows' built-in formatting tools. Have a read of this illustrated guide to gParted from dedoimedo.com; I've had reason to refer to this myself in my early days with Linux; it explains everything super clearly, and gives examples of most things:-

 

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/gparted.html

 

Hope that helps to dispel some of the 'fog' surrounding this kind of thing.....but please, do take note of madman's advice to defrag the drive first. This needs to be done from within Windows; Linux doesn't need defragging, since the file-system works rather differently (despite the fact that these are going to be on the same drive!)

 

Don't worry; it's nowhere near as confusing as it sounds!

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 02 February 2017 - 01:14 PM.

Distros:- Multiple 'Puppies'..... and Anti-X 16.1

My Puppy BLOG ~~~  My Puppy PACKAGES

Compaq Presario SR1916UK; Athlon64 X2 3800+, 3 GB RAM, WD 500GB Caviar 'Blue', 32GB Kingspec PATA SSD, Seagate 'Expansion' 3 TB  USB 3.0 external HDD, ATI Radeon Xpress 200 graphics, Dell 15.1" pNp monitor (1024 x 768), TP-Link PCI-e USB 3.0 card, Belkin PCI USB 2.0 4-port card, self-powered 7-port USB 2.0 hub

Dell Inspiron 1100; 2.6 GHz P4, 1.5 GB DDR1, 64GB KingSpec IDE SSD, Intel 'Extreme' graphics, 1 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external storage, HP HD2300 webcam.

 

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#10 DeimosChaos

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 01:45 PM

Definitely take a look at the GParted guide Mike posted. Should get you going on that. Its not too difficult at all, and fairly intuitive.

 

Since you already have windows, you would basically just split the current lump sum of the drive in two. Make sure you leave enough space to save more things in your Windows side. If you play games leave quite a bit, if you don't you know how much files and things you have so you can budget your drive accordingly.

Linux doesn't need as much space to get started as Windows. You could install Ubuntu on an 8GB drive if you so wanted. I also second the recommendation of using VMs for additional Linux OSes you want to explore. Ubuntu is a solid system so using that as your base is a good start. Take everything into consideration on what you want to do when creating your partitions and how much space you need.

 

*Edit*

 

Also - don't format your Windows partition - that would delete it and you would lose everything, obviously. I would back your important stuff up before messing with anything just in case.


Edited by DeimosChaos, 02 February 2017 - 01:46 PM.

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#11 NickAu

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 08:34 PM

Then you can change things around afterwards, once you get your Linux OSs installed.

When you install Linux along side Windows 10 you will need to edit UEFI to change the boot order you use efibootmgr to do this from the live CD or USB before shutting down.

 

efibootmgr3.png
 
 
This is what it will look like before the edit. As you can see Windows bootloader is 0001 and Ubuntu in this case is 0004
 
You would then run
sudo efibootmgr –o 4,1

This places the Linux bootloader before the Windows one.

 

Now I know some people will argue that you can install Linux in legacy mode but I say why bother, this way is easier.


Edited by NickAu, 02 February 2017 - 08:36 PM.


#12 cat1092

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 06:20 AM

 

 

Now I know some people will argue that you can install Linux in legacy mode but I say why bother, this way is easier.

 

+1! :thumbup2:

 

If one has a UEFI based computer, most ships with at least a 1TiB HDD minimum nowadays, though 2TiB & often a 128 to 256GiB SSD as a boot drive as a bonus, is becoming more common, even with notebooks. Why not use the power of UEFI with GPT partitioning to one's advantage? By chance, if there's a SSD as a boot drive, then one wants their root or '/' partition on the SSD, some may say the same for Swap (if needed). If there's 8GB RAM & one doesn't intend on running virtual machines are performing RAM intensive work, then one doesn't need Swap. And if there's 16GB or more RAM, even if running the RAM hard, one doesn't need it, it's just a outlet to make the RAM lazy, it's the fastest storage on one's computer, therefore the files should remain there when in use. 

 

When I setup my last two dual boot systems with W10 & Linux Mint 17.3 (later to become 18 & 18.1), what Nick shown above was how it was automatically setup, in the UEFI, it showed that 'ubuntu' was the first choice of boot, then Windows Boot Manager. The reason why it showed Ubuntu is because Linux Mint (the 2nd largest Linux distro in the World), just as many others, are based upon Ubuntu. The dual boot process was smooth, all I had to do was perform the time fixes to make sure that when booting into Windows, the time would be correct. That's all. :)

 

Like Nick stated, no need for Legacy Mode (or CSM), because GPT has many advantages over MBR, the first is the lifting of the 4 Primary partitions to 128 if needed (per drive), and there's a bit of a noticeable performance gain. Don't know why in late 2013, went from UEFI/GPT back to CSM & MBR, other than Windows 7 doesn't run on UEFI partitions, Maybe there's workarounds for this today, I recall an article that implied that one could slipstream the update, though didn't bookmark it, nor tried it, so the system is running in CSM, costing me some performance. I for sure won't do this again.

 

Good Luck with your project & it's my hope that your goals are achieved. Running Linux today is not hard as in years past (say 2010 & earlier). Back then, especially when I began in early 2009, there was nowhere close to the amount of resources available online & in libraries as it now is. The Internet is loaded with Linux articles, and there's tone of downloadable manuals for your use. :)  

 

I believe that you'll end up doing just fine in time to come. :thumbup2: 

 

Cat                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 PotatoEggy

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 08:41 AM

Woah. Gone for two days and this happens. You guys are fast.

 

As for using other OS's you can use virtual machine software like vmwareplayer and virtualbox

 

Well I've decided to install VirtualBox and test out the not-exactly-a-linux OSes, Remix and CloudReady. After testing, I've decided to keep it simple and dual-boot Ubuntu and Windows.

 

@madman:-

 

Good recommendation on using VMs.

 

@PotatoEggy:-

 

madman's right about gParted. It's an interactive GUI app for formatting & partitioning drives. You can move partitions around, and resize them, more or less by 'dragging' them on the graphical representation of your drive.

 

It's very easy to use.....and much more intuitive than Windows' built-in formatting tools. Have a read of this illustrated guide to gParted from dedoimedo.com; I've had reason to refer to this myself in my early days with Linux; it explains everything super clearly, and gives examples of most things:-

 

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/gparted.html

 

Hope that helps to dispel some of the 'fog' surrounding this kind of thing.....but please, do take note of madman's advice to defrag the drive first. This needs to be done from within Windows; Linux doesn't need defragging, since the file-system works rather differently (despite the fact that these are going to be on the same drive!)

 

Don't worry; it's nowhere near as confusing as it sounds!

 

 

Mike.  :wink:

 

Thanks for the guide, I found this one as well

http://www.everydaylinuxuser.com/2015/11/how-to-install-ubuntu-linux-alongside.html

 

I'm currently booting from Ubuntu on a Live USB. Seems to work fine, 

 

 

Then you can change things around afterwards, once you get your Linux OSs installed.

When you install Linux along side Windows 10 you will need to edit UEFI to change the boot order you use efibootmgr to do this from the live CD or USB before shutting down.

 

efibootmgr3.png
 
 
This is what it will look like before the edit. As you can see Windows bootloader is 0001 and Ubuntu in this case is 0004
 
You would then run
sudo efibootmgr –o 4,1

This places the Linux bootloader before the Windows one.

 

Now I know some people will argue that you can install Linux in legacy mode but I say why bother, this way is easier.

 

 

Installed Ubuntu, used GParted-created/split? partition, and successfully followed the instructions above.

 

 

 

 

Now I know some people will argue that you can install Linux in legacy mode but I say why bother, this way is easier.

 

+1! :thumbup2:

 

If one has a UEFI based computer, most ships with at least a 1TiB HDD minimum nowadays, though 2TiB & often a 128 to 256GiB SSD as a boot drive as a bonus, is becoming more common, even with notebooks. Why not use the power of UEFI with GPT partitioning to one's advantage? By chance, if there's a SSD as a boot drive, then one wants their root or '/' partition on the SSD, some may say the same for Swap (if needed). If there's 8GB RAM & one doesn't intend on running virtual machines are performing RAM intensive work, then one doesn't need Swap. And if there's 16GB or more RAM, even if running the RAM hard, one doesn't need it, it's just a outlet to make the RAM lazy, it's the fastest storage on one's computer, therefore the files should remain there when in use. 

 

When I setup my last two dual boot systems with W10 & Linux Mint 17.3 (later to become 18 & 18.1), what Nick shown above was how it was automatically setup, in the UEFI, it showed that 'ubuntu' was the first choice of boot, then Windows Boot Manager. The reason why it showed Ubuntu is because Linux Mint (the 2nd largest Linux distro in the World), just as many others, are based upon Ubuntu. The dual boot process was smooth, all I had to do was perform the time fixes to make sure that when booting into Windows, the time would be correct. That's all. :)

 

Like Nick stated, no need for Legacy Mode (or CSM), because GPT has many advantages over MBR, the first is the lifting of the 4 Primary partitions to 128 if needed (per drive), and there's a bit of a noticeable performance gain. Don't know why in late 2013, went from UEFI/GPT back to CSM & MBR, other than Windows 7 doesn't run on UEFI partitions, Maybe there's workarounds for this today, I recall an article that implied that one could slipstream the update, though didn't bookmark it, nor tried it, so the system is running in CSM, costing me some performance. I for sure won't do this again.

 

Good Luck with your project & it's my hope that your goals are achieved. Running Linux today is not hard as in years past (say 2010 & earlier). Back then, especially when I began in early 2009, there was nowhere close to the amount of resources available online & in libraries as it now is. The Internet is loaded with Linux articles, and there's tone of downloadable manuals for your use. :)  

 

I believe that you'll end up doing just fine in time to come. :thumbup2:

 

Cat                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

 

 

Sorry cat, but my computer isn't that strong yet. No SSD alongside the HDD. :(

Also, can you explain this to me? I don't really understand it.

:P

"Why not use the power of UEFI with GPT partitioning to one's advantage? By chance, if there's a SSD as a boot drive, then one wants their root or '/' partition on the SSD, some may say the same for Swap (if needed). If there's 8GB RAM & one doesn't intend on running virtual machines are performing RAM intensive work, then one doesn't need Swap. And if there's 16GB or more RAM, even if running the RAM hard, one doesn't need it, it's just a outlet to make the RAM lazy, it's the fastest storage on one's computer, therefore the files should remain there when in use. "

 

"Like Nick stated, no need for Legacy Mode (or CSM), because GPT has many advantages over MBR, the first is the lifting of the 4 Primary partitions to 128 if needed (per drive), and there's a bit of a noticeable performance gain. Don't know why in late 2013, went from UEFI/GPT back to CSM & MBR, other than Windows 7 doesn't run on UEFI partitions, Maybe there's workarounds for this today, I recall an article that implied that one could slipstream the update, though didn't bookmark it, nor tried it, so the system is running in CSM, costing me some performance. I for sure won't do this again."

 

 One more thing, does anybody know of a Linux distro that is speedy, a simple UI, and looks OK? (I know not to judge a distro purely by looks, but still) Because I would like to boot one as a substitute for Chrome OS. Chromebooks are very speedy. :)


Edited by PotatoEggy, 04 February 2017 - 08:44 AM.


#14 pcpunk

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 12:33 PM

IMO The two most popular are Ubuntu and Linux Mint, in Mint, it may be Cinnamon.  Cinnamon is got nice graphics and a real modern look, good for newer computers.

 

Personally, I wouldn't bother Quad Booting at this point.  If you are as new to Linux as I believe you can learn all you need in One Distro, and test the others out like mentioned in VM or Live.

 

Ubuntu: https://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop

 

Cinnamon: https://www.linuxmint.com/edition.php?id=226


Edited by pcpunk, 04 February 2017 - 01:07 PM.

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#15 cat1092

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Posted 05 February 2017 - 06:19 AM

 

Sorry cat, but my computer isn't that strong yet. No SSD alongside the HDD.  :(

Also, can you explain this to me? I don't really understand it.

 

Well, if you don't have a SSD yet, there's no need to be concerned. Yet if you do add one, then it does become of concern, you'd want your root partition on the SSD (32GiB is plenty of space for root), as well as a small Swap if running virtual machines, then /home on the HDD. 

 

You'll only understand these things if you have these, so for now, use what you have & enjoy! :thumbsup:

 

My reference in regards to UEFI & GPT are that both are advantages over the old BIOS/MBR setup, where one can only have 4 Primary partitions, then it's SOL when one needs another. There are also performance enhancements. Those with the BIOS/MBR systems can install Linux if necessary, using Logical partitions, as long as there's only three Primaries there (some OEM's includes 4 out of the box). One example which I recently worked on, a early Windows 7 notebook, he wanted to dual boot Linux Mint, though didn't want to mess with his partitions, the extra 'HP Tools' partition placed him at having 4. 

 

So I setup Linux Mint on a small external drive for him, when it's plugged in, it'll boot first, and there's no overwriting his current bootloader. I told him to never install a new kernel during updating, as that may mess things up, to call me, and I'd remove his drive for protection, just as we did during install, and upgrade any new kernels, of which there was a recent upgrade. :)  

 

Since you're new to Linux, I don't expect you to learn all of this in two days, two weeks or months. Learn at your pace & you'll be more comfortable & learn a lot more. There's a lot under the hood, and no one here knows it all, if so, that person would be so busy making cash that they'd have zero time for forums. I don't & never have claimed to know it all, rather enough to get by OK, and can figure out a lot by doing my own research. If I have a question, chances are, many others has had the same one, so I can find answers easily (here or on another forum). So generally, I'm a self reliant go-getter, though from time to time will have to create a Support Topic myself, and I've been running Linux Mint (MATE) for close to 8 years now, have been a Linux user for just over that long. :)

 

Still learning myself. nearly every day will discover something new, and so will you, as long as you stick with Linux. :thumbsup:

 

You have landed on one of the best Linux Communities on the Internet, if we don't have the answer, over 99.5% of the time, we'll find it in house or somewhere on the Web. :thumbup2:

 

 

IMO The two most popular are Ubuntu and Linux Mint, in Mint, it may be Cinnamon.  Cinnamon is got nice graphics and a real modern look, good for newer computers.

 

 

True, and by now Cinnamon is Linux MInt's #1 desktop edition (DE) & is perfect for most any computer built inside of the last 6-7 years, a little longer if one can install the GPU of their choice (if a desktop PC). :)

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 05 February 2017 - 06:19 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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