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Virtual Servers


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#1 Cynthia Moore

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 02:27 AM

I am running a legal case management software application called Time Matters. It used to run on a P2P network, but now requires a server. I do not want to buy or maintain a physical server for my 2-person firm, but I also do not want to convert 20+ years of client data to run on one of the cloud-based case management applications. So I am hoping that I can use a virtual server in the cloud.

 

It is my understanding that virtual servers can be used pretty much for any application that requires a server and the application really doesn't know whether it is running on a physical server in my office or a virtual server in the cloud.

 

Question #1: Is it true that Time Matters will be just as happy running on a virtual server as on a hardware server in my office?

 

Question #2: Is there a difference between a "virtual server" and a "virtual dedicated server"? Is the difference that a virtual server is running in a virtual machine that is possibly on a shared physical server with other VMs whereas a virtual dedicated server server is on its own hardware?

 

Question #3: Assuming I am right in #2, does it really matter to Time Matters whether it is on a dedicated virtual server or not? I assume it only matters to me because of cost and performance. And since my demands on the system are fairly low, a dedicated server should not be necessary.

 

Thanks for any help or pointers.

 


Running Win 10 & Office 365.


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#2 TheDcoder

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Posted 05 February 2017 - 06:09 AM

Question #1: Is it true that Time Matters will be just as happy running on a virtual server as on a hardware server in my office?

 

Question #2: Is there a difference between a "virtual server" and a "virtual dedicated server"? Is the difference that a virtual server is running in a virtual machine that is possibly on a shared physical server with other VMs whereas a virtual dedicated server server is on its own hardware?

 

Question #3: Assuming I am right in #2, does it really matter to Time Matters whether it is on a dedicated virtual server or not? I assume it only matters to me because of cost and performance. And since my demands on the system are fairly low, a dedicated server should not be necessary.

 

Answer #1: Yes, there is nothing stopping it from running it on a Virtual Server as long as it has the minimum requirements

Answer #2: You are correct.

Answer #3: You are correct here too.



#3 sflatechguy

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Posted 05 February 2017 - 11:13 AM

Depending on who needs to access the application and how, you could create a VM on your office hardware (provided your existing computers support virtualization), install the necessary operating system on the VM, and then install the application there. It appears this will run on Windows Server, yes?

 

If your users need to access the application and data from outside your network, via mobile phone, web browser, etc., you're probably better off using a cloud-based VM. Depending on the operating system required, you could use Azure or Amazon Web Services for this. The set-up and maintenance required to secure an on-premise server and still make it available externally is probably greater than a small office like yours can reasonably handle, so the cloud would be better.



#4 JohnnyJammer

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Posted 05 February 2017 - 05:25 PM

Just a word of warning, if you use a non dedicated server and the application ties its self to the MAC address then you are buggered big time.

Like AutoCAD serials are tied to the MAC address of the server hosting the keys!

 

So be warned about that.






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