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Paranoid about Protection


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14 replies to this topic

#1 IvanMilan

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 02:17 AM

Hey guys, to keep it short, I am about to get a gaming PC. But before I get all excited about it, I need to plan for my protection.

So here will be the parts:

Intel i7 7700

ROG Z270F Motherboard

ASUS GTX 1060

16GB Red Tesla RAM (2 Sticks)

750W Power supply (Cooler Master V-750)

1 7.2k RPM HDD
1 SSD (120GB)

 

I then used  the Outervision Power Supply calculator, the results were

Load Wattage: 378W

Recommended UPS Rating: 750VA

Recommended PSU Rating: 428W

 

Yes it's not totally accurate, but can I rely on these ratings?

I bought a power strip with surge protector already. And i'm planning to buy an AVR. The first problem is, is a 500w AVR enough to power this rig even when gaming? (Given that I'm trusting the Outervision Calculator) Secondly, other people are saying that having a power strip and AVR together is not a good idea. Why is that?

 

I just want to protect my PC, any reply will be appreciated. :)



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#2 MDD1963

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 04:55 AM

SUb-400 watts sounds right, but, I'd always rather have twice as much as needed when it comes to available power. (I'd never feel comfortable running a 390 watt peak load from a 430 watt PSU, for instance...)


Asus Z270A Prime/7700K/32 GB DDR4-3200/GTX1060


#3 IvanMilan

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 05:35 AM

Do you think the calculation from Outervision is somewhat close for the specs of my computer? 

 

If it is, then my power supply is more than enough, 750w. No doubt. But, will an AVR with a maximum of 500w cut it? 


Edited by hamluis, 02 February 2017 - 02:33 PM.


#4 RolandJS

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 06:12 AM

I highly recommend purchasing and using a high-quality, wattage-powerful enough, UPS; the surge strip will not protect against brownouts or blackouts.  Brownouts and blackouts lasting even "just for a second" can bring to a halt any desktop work and/or game in progress.  Surge strips, unless such contains an UPS module, normally cannot do anything about a brownout or a blackout [even "just for a second"]. UPS also "smooth out" the AC supply from the wall outlet.  Wifey and I have been using an UPS for our computer center for a few years now.

On a related note, those who are active in recording [strictly for in-home viewing] off TV or off the computer should also use an UPS; without an UPS, even just a "power blink" results in a sudden stoppage of any recording onto DVD in progress, the sudden powering back on, and the sudden resuming of the recording will often blank out any previous recordings.  With an UPS, we can do a controlled shutdown and only lose the current recording in progress.


Edited by RolandJS, 02 February 2017 - 06:13 AM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#5 IvanMilan

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 06:17 AM

Hello, Roland. Thank you for the reply. Yes, I am pretty much aware that UPSes are a must have. Unfortunately, it doesn't fit in my budget. With that said, I wish to protect my computer with a surge protector and AVR. I will save for an UPS in the long-run. At any rate, my question still stands... Is the calculation of Outervision at least close to the actual wattage that my computer will draw? And how about when I game? And finally, will a 500w AVR cut it?


Edited by hamluis, 02 February 2017 - 02:33 PM.


#6 RolandJS

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 06:24 AM

"Paranoid about Protection Started by IvanMilan, Today, 01:17 AM"

That is why I brought this up...[sorry, I can't undo the extra font in the title  :)   ]

 

I'm at a disadvantage, I do not know what an AVR is in this context.  I do know that I encourage you to upfront purchase and use a high-quality UPS -- because no surge strip by itself will protect against a brownout or a blackout, which, for a desktop, can lead to a great loss of valuable un-saved data and a sudden abrupt ending to a great game.  For probably only $100 -- you have one more very good, upfront, frontline, defense against data loss and game standings loss.


Edited by RolandJS, 02 February 2017 - 06:26 AM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#7 IvanMilan

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 06:32 AM

I'll keep that noted, if I only have the money, I wouldn't have second thoughts about buying a good UPS. I only want the best protection for expensive parts.

You think you could give me an answer if the Outervision calculator is reliable? :)


Edited by hamluis, 02 February 2017 - 02:32 PM.


#8 IvanMilan

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 06:36 AM

I was told that our house had a circuit breaker, does that help?



#9 RolandJS

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 06:37 AM

"You think you could give me an answer if the Outervision calculator is reliable?  :)  "

Sorry, I don't even know what that excellent question means!  Or even what is an AVR in this context!

Press on!  You will put together a great computer   :)


Edited by RolandJS, 02 February 2017 - 01:12 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#10 IvanMilan

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 12:16 PM

Guys can anyone confirm for meee :)



#11 JohnC_21

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 01:45 PM

You will not get AVR (Automatic Voltage Regulation) without a UPS that has AVR. Some of the cheaper UPS's do not include AVR. 

 

A house circuit breaker is not enough. Depending on your budget I would at least get a surge protector. Next would be a UPS without AVR where any voltage drops would be taken care of by the battery.

 

http://www.apc.com/us/en/faqs/FA158913/

 

Edit: I may be wrong in that there may be separate AVRs other than in a UPS available but I am not familiar with them.

 

Edit Edit: It seems separate AVRs are available.

 

https://www.amazon.com/OPTI-UPS-SS2000-6-Outlet-Automatic-Regulator/dp/B00305K3E0/ref=pd_sim_23_3/156-1470351-4296161?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=0XATACK1AV6VB7T609EP


Edited by JohnC_21, 02 February 2017 - 01:52 PM.


#12 IvanMilan

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 09:07 PM

Hello John, thank you for replying. I have a surge protector as of now. I'm planning to buy an AVR, while saving for an UPS for the long run. But my main problem is, should I trust the Outervision calculation? If yes, then an AVR with a limit of 500w is sufficient for my PC, right?


Edited by hamluis, 03 February 2017 - 03:16 PM.


#13 JohnC_21

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 11:39 PM

The recommended PSU for the GTX 1060 is 400W. I would think 500W for the AVR would be sufficient but I have not seen AVR's less than 1000W. It would also be determined by what the computer draws at full load. I would say you would definitely be safe with a 750W AVR but see the below links..

 

https://www.quora.com/Can-I-use-a-500w-AVR-to-my-650w-computer

 

http://www.buildcomputers.net/power-consumption-of-pc-components.html

 

If the above link says your load wattage is less than 500W then I believe a 500W AVR would be sufficient. You may want to look at a low end UPS of 750VA.or a 750W AVR if available but I don't know what your budget is. This can be used as an AVR but it's the battery that is used on voltage drops.

 

Supplies battery backup power during outages and unsafe voltage fluctuations, as well as protection from damaging surges and spikes

 



#14 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 03 February 2017 - 06:22 PM

A house circuit breaker will not protect you agianst voltage surges, brown-outs or drop-outs if it is of the normal RCD (Residual Current Detector) type. It is designed to protect against circuit faults of the current leakage type ranging from outright short sircuits down. And all they do is kill the voltage supply to a circuit very quickly. This itself will induce voltage pulses in any circuit controlled by it which is drawing current at the time.

 

The answer to your concerns is, as has been pointed out by others, a UPS which in the event of a supply failure continues to supply current to your equipment and allows for an orderly shut down if necessary. Whether you need one or not depends mostly on your location. If you live in an area prone to violent electrical storms then yes you need one; if you live at the far end of a long electricity supply link then you probably need one.

 

I happen to live in an area with a stable electric supply and electrical storms of any note are extremely rare, I don't even use a surge suppressor. Perhaps I should but I have never blown any electrical equipment due to voltage surges  -  yet !

 

Chris Cosgrove


I am going to be away until about the 22nd October. Time on-line will be reduced and my internet access may be limited. PMs may not be replied to as quickly as normal !


#15 RolandJS

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Posted 03 February 2017 - 07:56 PM

"yet !" - ah-huh; ok, get it before a yet happens  :)


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)





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