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KERNEL_DATA_INPAGE_ERROR BSoD when scanning drive


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#1 NayborRich

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 03:00 PM

Hello, I've experienced the BSOD "KERNEL_DATA_INPAGE_ERROR" about 3 times yesterday after attempts to clean and scan my hard drive. Before I explain, here's some info:

 

· OS - Windows 7
· x64
· Original OS on system - Windows 7 64-bit
· OEM
· Age of system (hardware) - 6 years and 10 months (purchased March 2010)
· Age of OS installation - Same as hardware age, no reinstall

· CPU - Intel Mobile Core 2 Duo T6670 @ 2.20 GHz
· Video Card - Geforce GT 220M
· Motherboard - N/A (laptop)
· Power Supply - N/A (laptop)

· System Manufacturer - ASUSTeK Computer Inc.
· Exact model number - ASUS Notebook K70IC

· Laptop

 

This computer's hard drive is partitioned into C:, with all the system files, and D:.

 

Here's the story:

 

Yesterday I was doing some clean-up and organization of my laptop's hard drive. I scanned through deleted files with Recuva, and though I tried clearing some multiple times, some wouldn't go away. I decided to do a full free-space clean up with CCleaner... the only problem being I set it to do 35 overwrites, which turned out to be a BIG mistake, as I later found out only 1 is necessary. I did the wipe on my D: drive (with "Wipe MFT Free Space" checked), and there was 36GB of free space being overwritten out of a 335GB drive (partition of 488GB HDD). Seven hours in, I had actually began reading up on if 35 overwrites was really necessary, and after I read plenty of bad things about it, I cancelled the wipe at 54%.

The actual wipe seemed successful: the junk file created by CCleaner was deleted, all space taken up by it was freed up, and deleted files no longer showed up in Recuva. However after that, I tried running a deep scan in Recuva on D:, which after a couple of short hangs, resulted in a BSoD with the error code:

KERNEL_DATA_INPAGE_ERROR

I remember it having "0x0000007A" after it, however, my minidump folder is empty and I took no pictures of the bluescreen. The only way I can know is by triggering the crash again, which I obviously don't want to do.

 

After that, I booted up again and tried running chkdsk on D: (through Windows Explorer rather than command prompt, and checking for both system errors and bad sectors), which upon completion, resulted in another BSoD. The same thing happened after trying again, resulting in my third blue-screen. Worth noting is that chkdsk completes with no error when checking only for system errors, and only crashes the computer when checking for bad sectors.

 

Since then, I've been avoiding stressing the hard drive in fear of causing it to fail. I've only done some minor changes, like moving/copying some files to my external drive or deleting some files, and I've avoided playing any games or using too many programs. Other than that, I've had no problems so far: I can access files on the drive easily, I've been browsing the web with no problems, and no software has any trouble running. I only experienced one minor freeze for a few seconds, when copying a folder from D: to my external drive, but most likely, it's because the folder had many files and I had my browser playing a youtube video.

I've looked through events in Event Viewer and found errors at the times the drive started acting up yesterday, in system logs. The error displayed is "The device, \Device\Harddisk0\DR0, has a bad block.", and these errors started popping up after I cancelled the CCleaner scan. I've noticed they have also appeared sporadically over the past few months, though I've never experienced any BSoDs related to this error.

 

I know I caused this damage and it might lead to hard drive failure. But, what's done is done, and I want to be able to fix it as best as possible. But even regardless of if I can, what I want to know is this: considering it deals with running through all my files on the drive, would backing up my files trigger the blue-screen?

 

Thanks for reading my long post and for any help in advance.

 

For attachments, the Sysnative App didn't create a .zip by itself so I zipped the output myself. Performance Monitor failed to generate a report.

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#2 usasma

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 07:38 AM

My first question is why did you choose yesterday to clean up your hard drive?

Was something going on that caused you to choose then to do it?  If so, what was going on?

 

As long as you cancelled the wipe and let it finish the operations to cancel it - there shouldn't be problems from the wipe of the free space.

Wiping other stuff can cause problems, but I've not encountered any BSOD's from this sort of wipe.

It's possible that, if you deleted Temp files, that programs relying on files in the Temp folder might be broken.  But programs aren't supposed to run out of the Temp folders on a permanent basis - so any programs that do this are (IMO) poorly designed.
BUT, malware does like to do this, so that's a possibility.

 

In short, the most important thing here is to ensure that you have your stuff backed up.

If this is a hardware problem with the hard drive, you can lose your stuff with no notice - so the backup is very important at this time.

 

BSOD's are caused by 2 different things - hardware problems or software problems.
On a fully updated Windows system, the most common error is 3rd party (non-Windows) software errors (about 90% of the time).

This is followed by hardware errors (about 10% of the time), then by Windows errors (less than 1% of the time).

 

While it's possible that you may have caused software errors on the hard drive - those are fixable (one way or another).
Hardware errors, on the other hand, aren't usually caused by the user.

So, please start with these free hardware diagnostics:  http://www.carrona.org/hwdiag.html

Start with the hard drive tests - but finish ALL of the tests and let us know the results.

If the hard drive test offers to fix bad sectors, you can let it do so - BUT be aware that it may "fix" a sector that your system needs to boot (which may mean that you have to reinstall Windows).

 

No memory dumps in the uploaded reports.

Nor are there any memory dumps listed in the KernelDumpList.txt file

There are no BSOD's listed in the WER section of the MSINFO32 report - but there are plenty of LiveKernelEvents - this is often a sign of a hardware problem

 

Only 297 Windows Update hotfixes installed.  Most systems with SP1 have 350-400 or more.  Please visit Windows Update and get ALL available updates (it may take several trips to get them all).
The actual number is not important.  Rather it's important that you checked manually, installed any available updates, and didn't experience any errors when checking or updating.

C: drive only has about 7% free space.  Windows likes 15% free space in order to perform stuff "behind the scenes" without adversely affecting the system's performance.  Please free up 15% on ALL hard drives (you can get away with 10% on larger drives and won't notice a large performance penalty).  Low free space can cause BSOD's - but the actual amount depends on the files being used by the system.

 


My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#3 NayborRich

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 09:22 AM

Hi, thanks for getting back to me. If you're wondering why I did the wipe, I wasn't experiencing any issues with my computer that caused me to do it, if that's what you were thinking. I did a full back-up of all my files onto my external drive a few days ago without encountering any issues or BSODs, so that's taken care of. I also haven't experienced any issues using my computer in general (though I would try to confirm this by running chkdsk, I don't want to risk it). I've also freed up all drives to more than 15% free space.

 

Because I'm unable to boot to a disk right now, I've downloaded Seatools for Windows (my hard drive is a Seagate ST950032 5AS SCSI Disk Device (ATA)). However, my HDD doesn't show up in the program no matter what, whether I try to rescan or run as admin. I've also tried running it in safe mode, which hasn't worked either. Do I absolutely need to use the DOS version that boots from a disk?

 

While I haven't experienced any drive-related issues so far, I have been experiencing a new issue - not sure if it's appropriate for this subforum or if you can help, but I'll put it here anyway since it might be related to this thread.

Since Feb 2nd, my monitor has some display problems: the very top is cut off by a thin flashing line, and the space on the bottom (about 12 pixels tall) is filled in by looping the bottom of the screen repeatedly (for example, in normal use, the last few pixels of the taskbar are displayed 3 times till the bottom). I can still move my mouse around the screen fine, and taking a screenshot shows the screen perfectly normal. Tried ways of fixing it from googling, none have worked (updating graphics drivers, changing resolution, changing refresh rate).

From time to time, the whole screen will start rapidly shaking up and down by a couple pixels, lasting anywhere from a minute to a half-hour. The strangest part is, at times the screen will shake depending on what window I currently have open: many times, switching from my Firefox window to Windows Explorer stops the shaking, with vice-versa starting it.

 

Most likely I'll take it to a technician since it's apparently a hardware problem, but I still want to know if this is something I can fix myself. I can provide some pictures and video if it's alright to post here.



#4 usasma

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 05:52 PM

No, use the Windows version of Seatools.

Most often this happens because of the AHCI controller (and disabling it in the BIOS will make the test work - but DON'T forget to re-enable it, otherwise the system won't boot!!!)

 

Start with the hardware diagnostics that I suggested earlier ( http://www.carrona.org/hwdiag.html )

There are also video tests in there.

Please run ALL of the tests and let us know the results.


My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#5 NayborRich

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Posted 07 February 2017 - 05:15 PM

I'm looking up how to change the storage controller, and I keep getting different methods of doing it, just inconsistent all around. Since I don't want to risk reinstalling Windows (as not changing it correctly apparently stops the system from booting), could you link me to one tutorial or tell me how to do it? I'll run the diagnostics as soon as I get that done.



#6 usasma

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 07:44 AM

Messing with the storage controller can stop the system from booting - I'd suggest not messing with it.

If you do mess with it, make a full image of your hard drive - just in case it doesn't boot.

Good luck!


My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#7 NayborRich

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 10:45 AM

I think you misunderstood: I need to run SeaTools for Windows on my drive, as it's my only option now, but the program doesn't detect my SATA drive. It seems I have to change the storage controller to make it work, but that's a very risky option. I was asking if you could tell me how to, or link a tutorial on how to do it, since the ones I find are inconsistent and I don't want to mess it up.

Sorry for any confusion - I know you reply to a lot of threads at the same time so some things can get mixed up.






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