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Mac AntiVirus cleaning tool


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4 replies to this topic

#1 kenshioni

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 12:49 PM

Greetings all,

 

I am wondering if anyone has come across a bootable anti-virus/malware tool for apple?  I work for a collage that has a free service we provide to students if they have viruses on their computers.  I have a toolset for windows already but am having a tough time finding something for the Mac's that are brought in. 

 

Any suggestions? 

 

 

Thanks


Edited by hamluis, 05 February 2017 - 09:18 AM.
Moved from Mac OS to AV/AM Software - Hamluis.


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#2 smax013

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 01:18 PM

You can create one yourself.

You will need an external drive that is large enough to fit the macOS on it plus whatever program(s) you want to install to use...a USB 2.0 hard drive or flash drive would likely be your best option as it will work with the most Macs. Then using the latest macOS Sierra installer from the Mac App Store and install macOS Sierra on it. This drive will now be bootable from any Mac that can run Sierra. You can then have whatever anti-virus/malware program(s) on it. The macOS has all the drivers for any supported Mac included, unlike Windows (because there are way to many Windows hardware variations for Microsoft to do that, but a much, much smaller number of actual Apple Mac variations).

You might need to create another version or two with older versions of the macOS for older Macs that cannot run Sierra (aka 10.12.x).

You will have a tough time finding something as it would require who ever offers it to also get a license for the macOS from Apple that they can then in effect resell to end users. The only way around that is to use another OS on the bootable media (which is likely what your Windows toolset does), but I am not aware of any such options for the Mac (I believe booting a Mac to another OS also requires "adjusting" the firmware/boot process of the Mac, which is what Bootcamp does for booting to Windows on a Mac). And then you would need an anti-virus/malware program that can run on that other OS but still read macOS formatted disks and scan for Mac related malware/viruses...again not aware of anything like that (which makes sense...the Mac is a much smaller market with way few known viruses/malware...plus you can easily create an external bootable drive yourself with the macOS on it that can run Mac anti-virus/malware programs, which is something much tougher to do on Windows).

Edited by smax013, 30 January 2017 - 01:27 PM.


#3 kenshioni

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 12:32 PM

ok thanks for the info.  I will play around with this and see what I can figure out.

 

thanks again.



#4 smax013

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Posted 01 February 2017 - 10:24 AM

It is pretty straight forward. Basically any Intel based Mac should boot from a USB 2.0 drive (this should technically include USB 3.0 drives as they technically should be backward compatible with USB 2.0), although I would tend to recommend Firewire for the earlier Intel Macs. Anything older will require a Firewire drive most likely assuming the Mac is not older enough to not even have a Firewire port. And if by some strange reason you are dealing with something even older (EXTREMELY unlikely...i.e. before even the "jellybean" iMacs), then you would need a SCSI drive assuming the Mac has a SCSI port...plus Macs that old likely can boot from a floppy running OS 9 or potentially earlier...of course, at that point, you likely will not find any current anti-virus programs that will work with a computer & OS that old...and current virus/malware likely won't affect a computer that old.

Just keep in mind that booting from a USB 2.0 drive with a much older and slower processor can take what seems like forever (my 2006 original MBP was this way). However, you likely will not have too many (if any) such computers to deal with...most should be relatively newer models that should boot relatively quick with a USB 2.0 drive.

As I said, it should just be a matter of attaching the external drive (of large enough size), format for a Mac using Disk Utility, download the latest macOS 10.12 Sierra installer/updater from the App Store and fire it up (I would suggest making a copy to another drive before firing it up...running a macOS updater/installer will cause it to be deleted after it runs, so if you need it again, you will have to download it again...if you do not copy it). From there, the process is pretty straight forward...just follow the steps. Once you reach the point to pick the disk to install it on, you should get at least two options...the boot drive and the attached external drive...pick the external drive. Then let it run. Once it is done, you then should be able to boot from the external drive (hold down the Option key when you boot up so that you can select the external drive). Once you boot from the external drive, you can then install any rescue (data recovery, hardware test programs, etc) or anti-virus/malware programs you want.

FWIW, some rescue/utility type programs will include a tool to built a rescue partition or disk. I know one such tool that does as I use it. It is called TechTool Pro.  In TechTool Pro's case, I believe it uses your macOS recovery partition in combination with the TechTool Pro to create a recovery drive/partition that includes the macOS.



#5 quietman7

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Posted 05 February 2017 - 11:32 PM


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