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Moving programs and OS to new partition


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#1 Planemaster2

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 09:29 AM

Hey all,

 

I made a new partition within my hard drive (250GB) after scanning it with HD Tune Pro. What I found was that the first 250GB part of my Hard Disk had the fastest read and write speed so I made a new partition at that size. Question is, how do I go about moving all the programs that I want to move to this new partition and how to move the OS as well.

 

Any ideas?

 

#EDIT: Please ignore this now, just realized my error 


Edited by Planemaster2, 29 January 2017 - 09:50 AM.


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#2 Platypus

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 09:43 AM

The fastest section of a hard drive is at the start, where the C: drive is normally created. Unless your system had an unusual preparation that left unallocated space at the beginning of the drive that you could create that 250GB partition in, the existing OS and applications already occupy the faster section of the drive. If you shrank the size of the C: partition and added a new one, it will be at the end of the drive where the data transfer rate is lower.


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#3 RolandJS

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 09:44 AM

Help me understand, you have one internal HD with two partitions; the original partition has your OS and programs;  you want to migrate, move, everything from the original partition into the target partition; I have one question:  how do you know that the new partition will actually be faster when there is actually lots and lots of OS and programs in it? 


Edited by RolandJS, 29 January 2017 - 09:45 AM.

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#4 Planemaster2

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 09:47 AM

The fastest section of a hard drive is at the start, where the C: drive is normally created. Unless your system had an unusual preparation that left unallocated space at the beginning of the drive that you could create that 250GB partition in, the existing OS and applications already occupy the faster section of the drive. If you shrank the size of the C: partition and added a new one, it will be at the end of the drive where the data transfer rate is lower.

 

Thanks, useful to know of course as I was following a tutorial somewhere which wasn't very clear as it is. 

 

 

Help me understand, you have one internal HD with two partitions; the original partition has your OS and programs;  you want to migrate, move, everything from the original partition into the target partition; I have one question:  how do you know that the new partition will actually be faster when there is actually lots and lots of OS and programs in it? 

 

The previous reply made me realise that I actually need a secondary hard drive to perform this partitioning trick, but thanks anyway. Just realized how stupid of me it was to do this  :mellow:


Edited by Planemaster2, 29 January 2017 - 09:48 AM.


#5 RolandJS

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 09:51 AM

Not stupid at all!  Everybody wants a faster OS and stuff -- you had the courage to do some research in different places, that's ok!


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#6 Platypus

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 09:53 AM

Never mind, we've all had an idea that seemed good until we took a second look at it! You can improve the responsiveness of a system with judicious use of a second hard drive, but these days you can get much more performance enhancement by using a SSD for OS and applications, and the regular HDD for long term data storage.


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#7 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 10:39 AM

I second the recommendation of an SSD for the OS and programs.


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#8 Planemaster2

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 11:01 AM

I second the recommendation of an SSD for the OS and programs.

 

Apparently, my mobo isn't great with SSD's. It doesn't have SATA 3, just lots of SATA 2 which isn't great fro SSD's unfortunately.



#9 Platypus

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 12:05 AM

You won't get the full potential from a SSD using SATA II as far as data transfer rate goes, but it should still be rather faster than a typical platter drive. More significant, the latency (delays) experienced by a spinning drive from spin speed and head seek time, doesn't trouble a SSD, and that difference applies regardless of the interface bandwidth.


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