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Windows 10 and Windows XP on the same computer


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#1 BertPeace13

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 10:57 AM

Good morning.

 

I have been trying to run XP based software (https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/638280/blitzkrieg-1-compatibility-issues-with-windows-10/?p=4167617) on my Windows 10 Home 64-bit equipped PC for about a week now, but have been experiencing frustrating crashes ever since the beginning.

 

I'm exploring options to keep the software, given that no-matter it being rather old, the game is just my kind of thing, and one is to have XP installed on a separate partition of my hard drive. However, It gives me the creeps to think that this might actually cause conflict with Win10; excepting Blitzkrieg Anthology, the name of the software involved here, the rest of the installed packages run on Win10, and it would be a massive screw-up if something like this happened.

 

Is it safe/not too complicated to do this? I haven't done anything yet, and am not exactly a computer expert (mostly a tutorial-based guy with a few bright ideas now and then).

 

By the way, PC is shared, and if I'm kind of an advanced beginner in this sort of matters, the other user is a complete neophyte, and it would cause him a nervous breakdown to have to choose between OS at startup. Can the switching be assigned exclusively to my profile (user), while his end stays with Win10 only?

 

Help, please.



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 11:07 AM

Depending on your CPU and how much RAM you have consider using VirtualBox to create a VM or XP.

 

I would avoid creating a dual boot system with XP and Windows 10 especially if the computer is UEFI and has a GPT disk as XP cannot boot from a GPT disk/UEFI computer. You will need an XP key in order to activate XP in the VM.

 

See this video



#3 BertPeace13

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 12:38 PM

Is VB safe to use? I'm really scared of busting the entire PC just because of a game, but at the same time, I really want to run Blitzkrieg Anthology trouble-free.



#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 12:59 PM

VirtualBox is safe to use but if you are that concerned about something going wrong and this computer is shared with another person I would consult that person before doing anything.



#5 BertPeace13

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 07:31 PM

I have been looking around VirtualBox.org, but just don't seem to grasp completely what the software does. Can you explain it to me, please?

 

Thanks for the help. 



#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 07:40 PM

VirtualBox creates a virtual instance of XP. XP is in a Virtual Machine and not installed on your hard drive as you would normally think. XP is basically a folder on your drive than runs within the VirtualBox environment. 

 

This page may help explaining

 

http://www.howtogeek.com/196060/beginner-geek-how-to-create-and-use-virtual-machines/



#7 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 06:58 AM

At its simplest you download and install the VM software - Virtual box or VMware(free) - just like any other application and it will produce an icon on the desktop if you want.

 

To use it just click on whichever method of launching you decide to use. The first time it starts it will ask you to install an OS inside it, this after all is the purpose of having a VM. To my knowledge you can run any flavour of Windows or Linux, and you can have more than one OS at a time inside a VM.

 

Once you have installed at least one OS in the VM when you start it running in the future it will offer a menu of the OS installed inside it and you pick which one you want to use. After you install an OS in the VM - in your case XP - you will have to install any applications you want to run in XP in the version of XP installed in the VM. The information given the other posts above should offer guidance on things like how much HD space and RAM to allocate to the VM but they really are quite easy to set up and use.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#8 smax013

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 06:51 AM

I have been looking around VirtualBox.org, but just don't seem to grasp completely what the software does. Can you explain it to me, please?
 
Thanks for the help.


Think of it as creating a virtual computer (this is virtualized/simulated by the VM program...in your case VirtualBox) with a virtual hard drive (this will be either file or maybe a folder on your computer) that is "within" your actual computer. So, when you fire up VirtualBox, you are kind of beginning the process of starting up this virtual computer. As noted by Chris Cosgrove, when you start VirtualBox, you likely* will be presented with a list of OSs to boot (if you only have XP, then the list will be one item long). Once you select the OS, the virtual computer will boot up in a window (with the potential for it to be full screen probably*). It will then be like you booted a second "computer" running Windows XP within that window that is effectively separate# from your Windows 10 computer. So, unless the VirtualBox program causes some issue with your Windows 10 setup (just as likely as say installing Microsoft Word or any other program might cause a problem), it should cause no problems with the Windows 10 setup.

* Note I don't use VirtualBox. I use Parallels for my VMs on my Macs. I assume it behave in a materially similar way. The above is based upon my experience using Parallels.

# VMs typically can allow "shared" file access between the host OS (in your case Windows 10) and the guest OS (in your case Windows XP) if you want...or not. If you are only using it to run a game, then it likely will not matter. Some people use VMs to test potentially malicious files (i.e. potential malware), in which case they likely will have such file sharing turned off to keep the guest OS theoretically completely separate from the host OS. In my case, I want this access typically as it then allows me to have both the macOS (my host OS) applications and Windows (my guest OS) applications all be able to access my files as needed.

Edited by smax013, 30 January 2017 - 06:53 AM.


#9 smax013

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 07:02 AM

I would avoid creating a dual boot system with XP and Windows 10 especially if the computer is UEFI and has a GPT disk as XP cannot boot from a GPT disk/UEFI computer. You will need an XP key in order to activate XP in the VM.


I understand it, most (if not maybe all) UEFI motherboard also support legacy BIOS booting. So, that should not be an issue unless I am missing something.

The GPT disk issue can be bypassed by installing Windows XP on a second disk, which is what I tend to do any way with dual (or multi) boot computers as I like to avoid the boot manager and just use the built-in motherboard BIOS/UEFI boot disk selection tools.

I am not necessarily arguing for a dual boot option. Many times I would be arguing that, especially for the purposes of running a game to get the most power for the game by running it with any loses from a VM. In this case, however, the game is ancient, so it should run fine in a VM.

#10 JohnC_21

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 08:05 AM

In order to boot on a UEFI enabled motherboard the disk must be formatted GPT. XP would not be able to boot on a GPT GUI partitioned disk even if Legacy Boot was enabled but XP would not detect the GPT disk during installation. Legacy Boot can be used on the motherboard for booting OSs on another hard drive that cannot boot from a GPT disk, the disk being formatted MBR.  

 

The OPs only option is to use another hard drive as you suggested or a VM.






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