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Winver: This app cannot run on your PC?


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#1 RetroRender

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 07:33 PM

I get one of those messages, as if I was attempting to open a 16-bit Program or the like.

 

"This app cannot run on your PC, to find a version for your PC, check with the Software Publisher"

 

I've heard of Microsoft breaking other programs, but their own? Blasphemy!

 

(Seriously, I don't know what to do.)

 

 



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 07:37 PM

Have you run an SFC /scannow?    Possibly followed by a DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If you are having "weird problems" with any Windows system, the first thing you should do is to run the System File Checker (SFC).  Open a Command Prompt window using the "Run as Administrator" option.  The easiest way to do this is to hit the Windows Key, immediately enter the text “Command Prompt” and getting the Command Prompt desktop app returned as the first item.  Gain focus on it and bring up the context menu either via right click or hitting the menu/applications key [if your machine has one] or Shift+F10 if it does not then selecting “Run as administrator” from the context menu that appears.  Once that elevated command prompt window is opened, enter:

SFC /scannow

When it's finished look at its output to see if it found any corrupt files and whether it was able to fix them.

If SFC reports that it was unable to fix something, on Windows 8 and Windows 10 systems it's also worth running the following command, also in a Command Prompt window that's been opened with "Run as Adminstrator":

DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth

DISM should be able to fix errors that SFC may not be able to fix.  If you wish to be really thorough, after running DISM, and presuming it reports that all has been fixed, shutdown and restart your machine and run SFC one final time.  The SFC result should be clean.


Edited by britechguy, 23 January 2017 - 07:39 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#3 RetroRender

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 07:41 PM

I've run the System File Checker, but I have not run the DISM tool yet. I'll report back my findings.



#4 RetroRender

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 07:50 PM

DISM Stops with the error: "The remote procedure call failed" @91.9%



#5 britechguy

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 08:10 PM

Is SFC coming back clean?

 

Did this start recently after something was installed or uninstalled?

 

My next step is a Reset using the "Keep My Files" option, but I hate doing these if you've installed any significant number of Windows Store Apps or Desktop Apps (formerly known as installed programs).


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#6 RetroRender

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 08:29 PM

Is SFC coming back clean?

 

Did this start recently after something was installed or uninstalled?

 

My next step is a Reset using the "Keep My Files" option, but I hate doing these if you've installed any significant number of Windows Store Apps or Desktop Apps (formerly known as installed programs).

SFC Came back clean. Said there was a few files to fix, and successfully fixed them. I remember having issues with Alienware Command Center, that sorted itself out after a few restarts. Maybe this is the case too?



#7 britechguy

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 08:34 PM

After shutting down I would try another SFC followed by DISM.

 

I doubt that this is something that will heal itself.  When something's not working with DISM and Winver, particularly after at least two SFC/DISM run pairs, something's up with Windows 10 itself, and that calls for a Reset, at least in my opinion.  Others may differ, but if so, I'd like to know what they'd propose doing in a situation such as this.

 

Also, do you have Fast Start on?  If so, I'd disable it.


Edited by britechguy, 23 January 2017 - 08:35 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#8 RetroRender

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 08:39 PM

Forgive my blissful ignorance, but I seem to have forgotten how to disable Fast Start.



#9 britechguy

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 08:44 PM

To turn Fast Start off, do the following:

  1. Open Control Panel then select Power Options.
  2. Activate the Choose what the power button does link on the left side of the dialog.
  3. In the dialog just opened, activate Change settings that are currently unavailable link.
  4. Scroll down to the Shutdown settings section.
  5. Remove the check mark from the Turn on Fast Startup (Recommended) checkbox.
  6. Select the Save Changes Button.

 

Additional Information

Another name for the Fast Startup is Hybrid Boot.

With a full shutdown everything is closed and nothing is saved.

When the Fast Startup is enabled and the computer is shut down, the User Session is closed, but the Kernel Session is Hibernated.  You are not doing a full shutdown, but a partial shutdown and partial hibernation.

From a Microsoft Forum discussion regarding Fast Startup:

“Now here’s the key difference for Windows 8: as in Windows 7, we close the user sessions, but instead of closing the kernel session, we hibernate it. Compared to a full hibernate, which includes a lot of memory pages in use by apps, session 0 hibernation data is much smaller, which takes substantially less time to write to disk.

If you’re not familiar with hibernation, we’re effectively saving the system state and memory contents to a file on disk (hiberfil.sys) and then reading that back in on resume and restoring contents back to memory. Using this technique with boot gives us a significant advantage for boot times, since reading the hiberfile in and reinitializing drivers is much faster on most systems (30-70% faster on most systems we’ve tested).”

 

I don't care how much faster it's claimed it can make startup compared to a "from scratch" startup.  When I power down my computer I expect that upon firing it up again the OS will be reloaded from scratch.  I've also seen some "interesting" things happen when the partial hibernation file becomes corrupted.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#10 RetroRender

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 08:48 PM

To turn Fast Start off, do the following:

  1. Open Control Panel then select Power Options.
  2. Activate the Choose what the power button does link on the left side of the dialog.
  3. In the dialog just opened, activate Change settings that are currently unavailable link.
  4. Scroll down to the Shutdown settings section.
  5. Remove the check mark from the Turn on Fast Startup (Recommended) checkbox.
  6. Select the Save Changes Button.

 

Additional Information

Another name for the Fast Startup is Hybrid Boot.

With a full shutdown everything is closed and nothing is saved.

When the Fast Startup is enabled and the computer is shut down, the User Session is closed, but the Kernel Session is Hibernated.  You are not doing a full shutdown, but a partial shutdown and partial hibernation.

From a Microsoft Forum discussion regarding Fast Startup:

“Now here’s the key difference for Windows 8: as in Windows 7, we close the user sessions, but instead of closing the kernel session, we hibernate it. Compared to a full hibernate, which includes a lot of memory pages in use by apps, session 0 hibernation data is much smaller, which takes substantially less time to write to disk.

If you’re not familiar with hibernation, we’re effectively saving the system state and memory contents to a file on disk (hiberfil.sys) and then reading that back in on resume and restoring contents back to memory. Using this technique with boot gives us a significant advantage for boot times, since reading the hiberfile in and reinitializing drivers is much faster on most systems (30-70% faster on most systems we’ve tested).”

 

I don't care how much faster it's claimed it can make startup compared to a "from scratch" startup.  When I power down my computer I expect that upon firing it up again the OS will be reloaded from scratch.  I've also seen some "interesting" things happen when the partial hibernation file becomes corrupted.

DMFeE9s.png

I do not have an Option for fast start or Hybrid Boot.


Edited by RetroRender, 23 January 2017 - 08:50 PM.


#11 RetroRender

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 09:00 PM

An interesting development!

 

4c0f1bc7826613e2ad8c21fbbb4ef67b.png

 

The screenshot above lists 4 Winver.exe's, two of which are 0 bytes. winver.exe from the Run command appears to be calling upon one of these two Zero byte files to run. I used the one from SysWOW64 and it loaded as normal.



#12 britechguy

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 09:11 PM

As far as your power options, you're missing things that should be on that page.

 

With regard to your 0 byte files, well that seems very odd.  Again, if SFC and DISM won't run you should do a Reset.


Edited by britechguy, 23 January 2017 - 09:13 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#13 RetroRender

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 03:34 AM

I disabled Hibernate, since I never use the option. Perhaps that's why Fast Boot isn't there. The only reason I could think of.

 

As for the Winver zeroing out, I strangely renamed the old System32 one "winver.exe.old" and copied the one from SysWOW64 into System32, and blamo, it works again. Strange how I had to do that, though. It seems that the Run command calls from the System32 Folder instead of SysWOW64.


Edited by RetroRender, 24 January 2017 - 03:35 AM.


#14 britechguy

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 10:22 AM

RetroRender,

 

             All I can hear in my head is, "tick, Tick, TICK, BOOM!"

 

             What you have experienced is entirely abnormal.  You have found a work-around for Winver but you can be sure there are other things wrong.

 

             I will repeat, one final time:  If you cannot get SFC, followed by DISM to come back clean then you need to consider a Reset or fresh install of the OS.  You are just inviting your next disaster by ignoring this.  But, in the end, that's your choice.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#15 RetroRender

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 11:04 AM

RetroRender,

 

             All I can hear in my head is, "tick, Tick, TICK, BOOM!"

 

             What you have experienced is entirely abnormal.  You have found a work-around for Winver but you can be sure there are other things wrong.

 

             I will repeat, one final time:  If you cannot get SFC, followed by DISM to come back clean then you need to consider a Reset or fresh install of the OS.  You are just inviting your next disaster by ignoring this.  But, in the end, that's your choice.

I have a USB Recovery Drive on-hand in-case of disaster. I've installed with Legacy BIOS, so I can access a boot drive any time I need.

 

I just don't really want to right now because I'll have to reset everythingand remove some apps before I do so, etc etc. I don't quite have the time to lately, and I'll most likely get around to it when and where I can.






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