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Are mice dangerous to the eyes?


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8 replies to this topic

#1 MickinPlymouthUK

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 04:12 PM

Hi, PC dummy here. There are two types of mouse aren't there, ones that use an optical light, and ones that use a laser light?

When my niece visits me I'm worried that her toddlers might look at the pretty light underneath the mouse when they're having a go on my computer. It's probably a stupid question but is there any risk to their eyes? 

 



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#2 bludgard

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 05:01 PM

Absolutely could be dangerous... close enough, eh? 'Specially round the young-ens.

Edit: Not sure which mice do not have the pretty lights but maybe a track-pad (USB) would help... which may help with motor-skills as well? IDK... just making observations.


Edited by bludgard, 22 January 2017 - 05:04 PM.


#3 MickinPlymouthUK

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Posted 27 January 2017 - 12:14 PM

Absolutely could be dangerous... close enough, eh? 'Specially round the young-ens.

Edit: Not sure which mice do not have the pretty lights but maybe a track-pad (USB) would help... which may help with motor-skills as well? IDK... just making observations.

 

Thanks, and incidentally how do we know if a light under a mouse is just an ordinary light or a laser light?



#4 RolandJS

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Posted 27 January 2017 - 12:23 PM

Is this computer a desktop or a laptop?  If desktop, you can plug into the PS/2 ports a PS/2 keyboard and a PS/2 mouse.  I think a laser light often shines out as a tiny slim beam - somebody correct me if I'm in error.


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#5 MickinPlymouthUK

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 06:29 PM

Is this computer a desktop or a laptop?  If desktop, you can plug into the PS/2 ports a PS/2 keyboard and a PS/2 mouse.  I think a laser light often shines out as a tiny slim beam - somebody correct me if I'm in error.

 

I've got a laptop and a desktop PC, the laptop uses a wireless mouse which has got a light under it but the light is completely invisible to the eye, how weird is that?

The desktop mouse has got a bright blue light under it, dunno if its a laser but I avoid looking at it anyway.

Incidentally during an eye test last year, my optician said he noticed small spots on the lens of my eye but they're apparently not serious and I hardly notice them during everyday activities. It's probably just a natural aging thing (I'm in my 60's) but I can't help wondering if the assorted lights and lasers in the computer world might have something to do with it.


Edited by MickinPlymouthUK, 31 January 2017 - 06:29 PM.


#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 09:58 PM

Some additional info on safety

 

http://superuser.com/questions/222235/can-the-light-at-the-bottom-of-an-optical-mouse-damage-your-eyes

 

https://www.lia.org/subscriptions/safety_bulletin/laser_safety_info

 

Any mouse laser is probably class 1.

 

Class 1
A Class 1 laser is considered safe based upon current medical knowledge. This class includes all lasers or laser systems which cannot emit levels of optical radiation above the exposure limits for the eye under any exposure conditions inherent in the design of the laser product. There may be a more hazardous laser embedded in the enclosure of a Class 1 product, but no harmful radiation can escape the enclosure.

 


Edited by JohnC_21, 31 January 2017 - 10:03 PM.


#7 MadmanRB

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 04:41 PM

Not really, I mean if its standard mouse with a light say a bluetrack mouse or gaming muose the light is provided by a LED rather than a laser beam


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#8 MickinPlymouthUK

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Posted 03 February 2017 - 12:36 AM

Thanks guys it seems mouse lasers are Class 1 and not dangerous, but I'll avoid looking at them anyway..:)

PS- I read an article some years ago in Reader's Digest (I think it was), in which the crew of a US Coastguard helicopter were watching a Russian trawler some distance off when they were briefly hit by a flash of light from it. "I think we just got lased" said one of them, and although there were no immediate effects, their eyes felt sore when they got back to base, and recovered with no apparent ill effects.

PPS- In the Falklands War of 1982 the Brit Navy were using lasers to dazzle incoming enemy pilots, at least one warship was fitted with one and it was known as a "flasher" but I don't know if it was ever used in action. I later read up on the subject and I gather lasers have generally been dropped by the world's armed forces because "they can easily be countered".

The subject is still a bit hush-hush but perhaps a special coating on the perspex cockpit canopy or on the pilots goggles can deflect lasers.

Also, I suppose the military thought "Why hit a plane with a laser when you might just as well hit it with a missile or gunfire?"..;) 



#9 technonymous

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Posted 03 February 2017 - 04:16 PM

The newer mice now have a infrared beam. You must have a older red LED one. Yes, they are dangerously bright and will damage the retina in the eye. Not to mention wireless red LED ones drain batteries like 3 times as fast.


Edited by technonymous, 03 February 2017 - 04:24 PM.





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